Did your music taste change when you started playing guitar?

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by Mike Tele, Sep 30, 2021.

  1. ClashCityTele

    ClashCityTele Tele-Afflicted

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    Well if you want to get technical.

    90% of 'punk' guitarists in the late 70's UK punk scene seemed to play either a Gibson LP Jr/ LP Special/ SG or Fender Tele.
    That covers the Damned, early Clash, early Sex Pistols, Buzzcocks, Adverts, Slits, 999, Stranglers, Sham 69 etc.
    Later on a few LP's & Yamaha SGs appeared.
     
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  2. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I met Ivan a few years later when I was the in house guitar tech at Main Drag Music in Brooklyn. He was the amp tech but worked from home. I had bought a heavily modded Twin that was sort of Dumble style with gooped circuit but by Harry Kolbe. Ivan took the amp twice and I didn’t feel he fixed it right so we were a bit at odds. He was not a friendly guy and you could not make him smile.
    Never mentioned that I bought one of his old Strats and parted it out.
     
  3. Si G X

    Si G X Tele-Afflicted

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    lol, I know.... I thought about it for bit and figured I wouldn't want to lose the job in the movies, so made a decision.

    But now I'm watching it back on the big screen I kinda wish I'd gone for a Mosrite and an SG. ;)
     
  4. loopfinding

    loopfinding Friend of Leo's

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    With me it was the opposite. Music was always a study-ish thing (classical, jazz, rock “greats”, etc.). So even when I first went unconventional, it was nerdy laborious IDM stuff. I have to question myself now when I hear good playing - “yeah, they’re a good player, but at the end of the day, is the music good?” Getting into punk and related changed my perspective and made me less of a fascist.
     
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  5. Digital Larry

    Digital Larry Friend of Leo's

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    Before I started playing, I gravitated towards virtuoso type stuff. Once I started playing, I realized that this was out of reach and learned more basic stuff. 40 years later I am a much better player but still not at that virtuoso level nor likely to get there in this lifetime. Now I just listen to what I find enjoyable rather than simply counting notes per second. Some of my favorite stuff these days rates pretty low on the NPS scale.
     
  6. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Then music for fun freed you from fascist education zealotry?
    Makes sense actually.

    I listened intently as a kid and sang most of what I head on the radio. Felt connection at the soul level and believed I could find freedom in playing music that wasn’t visible to me in other professions.

    Of course the reality is that music is all about structure and rules and study, not just a free for all. Still room to scoff at laws but not as free as I hoped, even free music isn’t free.
     
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  7. loopfinding

    loopfinding Friend of Leo's

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    totally. my experience with music education was always like “defenders of the true music.” getting into it earlier solidifies the chops, but mindset-wise it’s perhaps better to get into it a little later than earlier. but I also came up at a time where a lot of “rules” were already established, even for “vulgar” stuff like rock n roll.
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2021
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  8. loopfinding

    loopfinding Friend of Leo's

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    .
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2021
  9. Asmith

    Asmith Friend of Leo's

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    I'd say playing has kept me interested in music and has made me look for more stuff that I like. But I wouldn't say it has led me to change the genres I like though.

    I still like a lot of music I wouldn't play on guitar and that's also relatively similar to now than it was in my early teens.
     
  10. DougM

    DougM Poster Extraordinaire

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    For me it was really the other way around. I started playing guitar because of my music tastes. I wanted to learn how to make those sounds.
     
  11. HotRodSteve

    HotRodSteve Poster Extraordinaire

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    Did your music taste change when you started playing guitar?

    No.
     
  12. davidge1

    davidge1 Friend of Leo's

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    Right... so back to the original question.

    Yes, my tastes evolved a lot once I started playing guitar at age 14. Mainly because I started hanging out with other musicians almost exclusively, and they turned me on to all kinds of great music. More importantly, I started listening to music as just "music" instead of "my music", and looking at music from different times and places as being something relevant to me... which I had never done prior to that.
     
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  13. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    All drummer jokes aside, when I had a band rehearsal in my apartment and the drums moved in, I sat down and played drums for the first time. Kind of blew my mind as I never really listened to drummers, heard they were busy or simple and kept the beat but not much else.
    Suddenly I could hear what drummers were doing and also found playing music without melody or notes boosted rhythm thinking and imagination.
    I didn't become a drummer but bought drums and learned to play, certainly expanded my thinking and playing as well as listening.
    Plus added a taste for a few great drummers.
     
  14. aging_rocker

    aging_rocker Friend of Leo's

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    I guess that my guitar playing 'style' (sounds a bit pretentious to use that word) has evolved alongside my ever changing music tastes, but not so much the other way round.

    Since I started playing in the early 70s, my world has moved on a lot musically.
    As a spotty youth, around the time I got my first (horrible) guitar, I was introduced to the world of the blues by a friend's father. And another friend had the obligatory big brother who had all the classic rock band stuff (and a big old house with a big old stereo...) - we listened (loudly) to Zeppelin, Purple, Sabbath, Hawkwind, and all the usual suspects.

    Around 74/75, stuff like the Stooges, Dr. Feelgood, Be-Bop Deluxe, Can, Kraftwerk, etc. started to creep in.

    And then, 76 arrived, with a very big bang. Punk arrived in the shape of the Clash, the Pistols, Damned, Stranglers, Adverts, etc. That changed my world, big time. The creeping dissatisfaction with the lukewarm leftovers of the 60s and early 70s suddenly seemed very real and obvious - like we had been waiting for punk all this time but didn't know it. Reggae, particularly dub, became huge in my life at this time.

    I was very aware that the kids who came a long a few years later didn't have the background of the earlier stuff, musically they were 'ground zero' punks. So they didn't appreciate Humble Pie or any of that other 'old fart' stuff we would still listen to. :p

    Playing in 'punk' bands was so liberating, we didn't have to learn a bunch of new and complicated chords, or have the greatest gear on which to play it. But we could play pretty much what we liked, there really weren't many 'rules' (OK, no prog...:D) and we could just have a whole bunch of fun.

    Then the 80s came along, with a whole new set of bands to listen to. I'd stopped playing much by around 82/83, life got a bit serious in various ways and new responsibilities arrived.

    So when I picked up the guitar again decades later, I just played what I knew, and still do. It's just for my own pleasure, so I pluck things from several different decades and styles.

    And, my punk 'weaponry' included a Tele, and SG and a Marshall half-stack, mainly.

    A lot of the music I enjoy these days is not 'guitar' music.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2021
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  15. Live_Deliciously

    Live_Deliciously TDPRI Member

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    OP- I’ve had the exact same experience. I love doom and death metal, but my favorite stuff to play is more bluesy riffs and maaaayyyybe sabbath. Don’t enjoy playing actual metal
     
  16. bromdenlong

    bromdenlong Tele-Meister

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    It'd be an electric 6-string, and probably not super pointy. That's still an awfully broad range.
     
  17. 421JAM

    421JAM Tele-Holic

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    If you’re wardrobe designing a punk guitarist (not an upper middle class kid with a high school band, and not a millionaire in a pop-punk band, but an authentic dirty street punk guitarist) for a movie, your safest bet is a solidbody, on the lower end of the price range, the character would have bought it used, maybe at a pawn shop, and therefore it’s a model that was mass produced, it’d be beat up from the inherent aggression of punk music and rowdy audiences that spit, fight, and throw things. And since the punk archetype is based on the bands of the mid to late ‘70s, you’re looking at a pretty small number of options. Les Paul/Jr/SG, Tele, Strat, maybe a Fender offset. Obviously there are exceptions and not everyone used those models (and that’s increasingly true now that the guitar market is much more vast, and punk generates a lot of money). But those were by far the most commonly used guitars by punk bands when punk became a recognizable entity.
     
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  18. 526THz

    526THz TDPRI Member

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    Same for me. Or better: I started playing guitar with Metal. I was a bass player at the time and wanted to learn guitar too. Then paused for many years.
    When I started playing again I focused on guitar. But I also started a sort of journey similar to "ok, I love Megadeth, Metallica, Guns (ok, not so metal, but you get the point) but who inspired them? Aerosmith et al. and who inspired them? Led Zeppelin. And who inspired them?...." and I landed to the Blues. Started to listen to Howlin Wolf, Muddy, Robert Johnson, Buddy Guy... and then... Johnny Winter, SRV, Gary Moore... And this is what I (try to) play 90% of the time now.
     
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