Did you ever notice this about Area Codes?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Buckocaster51, Aug 28, 2014.

  1. Buckocaster51

    Buckocaster51 Super Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

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    Did you ever notice that in the original 86 North American Area Codes, the second digit was always "0" or "1"?

    With rotary dials, Area Codes like "212" were easily and quickly dialed. NYC was truly smiled upon by the Phone Gods.

    I grew up in the "815" area. I guess Ma Bell didn't like us much.

    Chicago was "312" while southern Illinois was assigned "618". That is six (6) dial clicks compared to fifteen (15).

    South Carolina was "803". That is TWENTY-ONE (21) clicks of the dial. Compare that to NYC's " five (5) clicks with "212."

    With a rotary phone you could almost see the grass grow as you dialed a number like "618 847 8970"

    With the advent of digital dialing, this all became a moot point.

    If you know what I mean. :eek:

    Out of curiosity, are there any of you there that have NEVER dialed a rotary phone?

    :?:
     
  2. Marshall_Stack

    Marshall_Stack Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    That zero took forrrrrrrever.
    NJ - 201.
     
  3. jipp

    jipp Friend of Leo's

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    heh, i remember having them phones. im right at that age. where you may or may not of used one. ill be 40 in oct. growing up poor. i probably got more of the old technology compared to someone my age who was better off they probably had the latest and great technology.
    good memories dialing that phone. :d
    chris.

    p.s
    their is a trend of such technology now being hip. you can buy new rotary phones. etc.
    but who has a land line anymore to use such.. another tend that will die hard.
     
  4. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Back when my father used a dial up modem, he changed Internet Services Providers one time and then couldn't connect with the new one, so he called their service desk. It took a long time until they realized the problem: he needed to indicate he was dialing up with a *rotary* phone. "Why didn't the technician ask me that first?" my dad said to me. Maybe because the tech wasn't old enough to have ever seen one of those phones!

    My dad finally retired that phone, but there was nothing wrong with it. It would have probably lasted decades longer.
     
  5. kelnet

    kelnet Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I would always get impatient with those higher numbers and try and speed up the dial as it spun back.
     
  6. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    The Phone Gods knew something lousy was coming for the NYC area.

    First, they lost the Dodgers.

    Then, they got the Jets.

    Gotta give the poor guys in that region a break, haven't you? ;)
     
  7. Buckocaster51

    Buckocaster51 Super Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

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    One of the cool things about the phone system is that a rotary dial phone can talk to the newest smartphone.

    Think about that for a bit.
     
  8. waparker4

    waparker4 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    It's funny that a dial refers to something round like the face of a clock, but now to "dial" a phone number has nothing to do with something round like the face of a clock anymore.

    On Google you can search the usage frequency of a word over time, here's "dial"

    https://books.google.com/ngrams/gra...4;,dial;,c0;,s0;;dial;,c0;;Dial;,c0;;DIAL;,c0

    I assume the spikes around 1890, 1950, and 1995 are for the rotary dial (patent filed 1891), "don't touch that dial" TV shows maybe? and then the dial-up modem?
     
  9. cowboytwang

    cowboytwang Poster Extraordinaire

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    I remember a girlfriends number back in high school, seemed like it took forever to dial. 805-488-9090, although my number wasn't that much better at 805-488-6757
     
  10. TC6969

    TC6969 Friend of Leo's

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    My buddy in junior high had a phone with a busted dial.

    To call out, you had to tap the hang up button on the cradle.

    All our numbers back then started with 636 so to call 636-1234 you had to tap the button 6 times(pause) 3 times(pause) 6 times (pause) and so on.

    I'll bet he was glad he didn't know anyone at 636-9899!
     
  11. telleutelleme

    telleutelleme Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Fireside 5 (345-xxxx) (415 covered the whole state of California, so you didn't have to dial it for local numbers) - Wonder what the real point of retaining letters on the keys is?; especially touch screen phones; which also have a keyboard for texting. Advertising gimmick so businesses can create catchy words I guess.
     
  12. vanr

    vanr Tele-Afflicted

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    I remember when my number was BR549.......
     
  13. cowboytwang

    cowboytwang Poster Extraordinaire

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    Junior?
     
  14. waparker4

    waparker4 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I don't know but I find it really useful to speed dial contacts on my touch screen phone by typing the first few letters of their name

    For example, "James" - 526 ...
     
  15. Flat6Driver

    Flat6Driver Friend of Leo's

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    If you read up on Wikipedia, the codes were assigned in some fashion to make it hard to misdial. There was also some idea about keeping the relays from being overloaded, hence why the zero was used or something. Some people have faster fingers. I have read up a bit on this in the past. It's very interesting.
     
  16. Hell on a Six

    Hell on a Six Tele-Meister

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    Remember trying to win call in radio contests on the rotary phone?
    "Caller #19, call back...."
    "Caller #27, call back...."
    (but most of the time it was just a busy signal)
    You held the base of the phone down with one hand and dialed with the other as the dialing action got quite intense.
     
  17. fendertx

    fendertx Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I could hear the clicks in my head as I read your comment. My daughter has a smart phone, she has never dialed a rotary phone.

    I told her we used to have to actually call a friends house and usually Mom would answer. You would have to be polite to Mom and ask to speak to so & so. When your friend got on the phone, the two of you would have a real awkward conversation. Thats because you were on the living room with you parents and they were in the kitchen with their parents. That is if you did not get a busy signal...
     
  18. waparker4

    waparker4 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Too bad you couldn't just press call twice to re-dial.
     
  19. Big John Studd

    Big John Studd Friend of Leo's

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    I never noticed it, but honestly I don't ever remember having to dial the area code back then and there. You only had to dial the last 7 digits to get connected. I think the area code was only needed for long distance calls, which were infrequent and reserved for special occasions at our house.

    Surely there is some app out there that lets you use the touch screen of your smart phone to experience the retro coolness of a rotary phone with the clicks and everything.
     
  20. stratofortress

    stratofortress Tele-Afflicted

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    Having to dial the area code came along in Maryland sometime in the 80's I think.

    another thing about phone etiquette...
    when I was a kid and that phone rang while we were eating dinner I would pray it was not one of my friends calling because they and myself would get an earful from my dad..
     
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