Did Fender invent the maple fretboard?

dlew919

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Did instruments have this before? Is it another brilliant fender innovation? Or a long established cheaper practice?
 

Engine Swap

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I have a 50's archtop with a maple fretboard

391663156_d75c55cf45_h.jpg
 

61fury

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I want to know if Fender invented string trees.

Did anyone else before cut their neck out of one piece of wood that lacked the headstock tilt?
 

LOSTVENTURE

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Leo was putting together a lot of existing components into one exquisite instrument. But, being an engineer, he was keeping everything as simple, and functional as possible. And a single piece neck is as simple as it gets.
If that does not define the Tele, I don't know what does.
 

Peegoo

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Many banjos had maple necks/fretboards, back into the 1800s.

As the story goes, Leo was watching some hillbilly TV show where the band was playing Fenders, and the maple fretboards were worn and blotchy-lookin'. Bad for brand image.

The next day, Leo met with his leadership team at the factory and that's when they moved to rosewood.
 

radiocaster

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More than 100 years ago it was fairly common to put maple fingerboards on lower priced cellos.
They got French polished black though.
Can’t specifically recall what age guitars I’ve seen maple boards on.
Bulgarian guitar. Maple fretboard painted black. (Dealer photo, but I know about that model)
original.jpg

Not sure of the date, but could be as late as 80s. 80s East European guitars look like 60s guitars from elsewhere.
 
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jvin248

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.

Violins have had maple necks since the 1600s. They used ebony fingerboards for improved wear, having no frets.
I expect that along the centuries since then someone put maple fretboards on their violin builds (and probably stained the maple dark).

 

oldunc

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Leo was putting together a lot of existing components into one exquisite instrument. But, being an engineer, he was keeping everything as simple, and functional as possible. And a single piece neck is as simple as it gets.
If that does not define the Tele, I don't know what does.


Not only single piece, a single piece of small dimension lumber.
 




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