Diabetics that eat junk food - wth?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Big_Bend, Apr 24, 2019.

  1. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Tracy’ll break the disease down for ya...
     
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  2. kingofdogs1950

    kingofdogs1950 Tele-Holic

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    T22, I find your post very accurate.
    I think of it as curve matching. You eat a particular food and you get a rise in blood sugar that makes a bell curve of a certain shape. You take insulin and you get a bell curve shaped response lowering blood sugar for an amount and duration. The idea is for the two curves to match perfectly. Not so easy. There are a mess of variables that give you entirely different curves.
    It gets very complicated when you throw in some exercise which potentiates insulin's action or an infection that also makes matching food and insulin more difficult.
    My best course has been to follow a regular life. Too many variables, sigh...
    As they say in Florida, "Life's a beach."

    Mark
     
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  3. Art VanDelay

    Art VanDelay Tele-Afflicted

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    At least heroin does something. You know its good if living on the street is worth it.
     
  4. Uncle Bob

    Uncle Bob Tele-Holic

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    It's the same for hillbillies, we talk the same way about it.

    I didn't know anyone that had it as bad as poor old Kevin from down south though.
     
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  5. telestratosonic

    telestratosonic Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    I hear you.

    My 38 year old daughter has been a Type 1 since she was 10. My mother was a Type 2 when she hit 50 or so and had to inject insulin. I don't sweeten my coffee with sugar or eat pastries or drink soft drinks. I'll have an 8 ounce glass of wine most days. I'm a big water drinker and rarely have a beer. I'm a sucker for left over Halloween treats though and that's not a good thing.

    I have a tester so I'm able to check my blood sugar. So far so good.

    The temptation for bad foods can be strong and there's so much hidden sugar in ketchup, etc. Just my two cents worth but I think it takes a while to get that craving out of one's system. Some can but some can't.
     
  6. NashvilleDeluxe

    NashvilleDeluxe Tele-Holic

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    I've had a few hypoglycemic events (too much insulin) where I thought, "this is it...I'm a goner." The most recent was two weeks ago. If not for my quick-thinking girlfriend and some juice boxes, I'd have been toast. I had time to suck back a juice box, then passed out. I remember nothing.
    You get good at estimating/counting carbs, but once in a while you get caught in a low; they can hit quickly, and be stubborn to "turn the corner" and get back into the safe zone. By then, my clothes are soaked and mentally I am a total zombie. It takes hours to get back to feeling normal again.
     
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  7. stratofortress

    stratofortress Tele-Afflicted

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    Its really telling when you watch old clips of like say the Kennedy assassination or some of the Apollo lift offs from the 60's and 70's.
    The crowd scenes you had very few overweight people in any of them.
    Now take a typical crowd scene from last week at any event and most of what you see are overweight people.

    My wife had all kinds of things wrong with her 5 years ago.She had gastric by pass surgery and within 30 days she was off every medication that she had been taking for years.No more high blood pressure,no more insulin,no more high cholesterol medicine.
    She was one happy camper.
     
  8. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    My folks live in an area with lots of amish people.
    Somehow, those people seem to not have the "fat gene", hmmm...
     
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  9. MattyK-USA

    MattyK-USA Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Didn't say I approved, I said I agreed. Much like 50% of the rest of the posts around here are either agree or disagree. Love you too. :)
     
  10. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Thanks for sharing
     
  11. nvilletele

    nvilletele Friend of Leo's

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    Passing out is not good, to say the least. I have fallen asleep after going really low and sweating profusely, but only after I have ingested some sugar (and showered). It really saps your strength, for hours as you noted.

    If you can afford it or if your insurance covers enough of it, consider getting a continuous glucose monitor, which will show a graph of blood sugar levels (so you know which direction your sugar level is heading and will beep loudly when you go low. It sounds like, for you, it could be a potential lifesaver.
     
  12. studio1087

    studio1087 Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Technology sure helps.

    Abbott labs has the new Freestyle Libre system where you no longer have to pick your fingers. It costs a bit more out of pocket but I'm so glad that my Endocrinologist talked me into it.

    A little pad with a tiny needle gets popped onto the back of your arm. You can wave a meter past the pad as often as you like and you get a reading which goes into a graph that can be off loaded via Bluetooth. The pad is about the size of a quarter. You can bathe, hottub and swim with the pad (but I can't scuba dive - I can't use the system on vacation). You can get hourly data for your doctor and yourself. The pads last two weeks and you yank them off and install another pad. It's really easy. You do it at home. The upright gray thing in the right photo is like a sterile spring loaded dart gun. You gently push it onto your arm and it goes "bang" and the pad is inserted and adhered.

    If I wave the sensor device past my arm in a restaurant people don't even notice. They probably think I'm fidgeting with a cell phone. I guess it's not very interesting. If you have two used pads you can stick one to each side of your neck and pretend to be Frankenstein at the dinner table. I had our 18 year old laughing to the point where he couldn't eat one night. My wife was not amused. Poor woman. You have to have some fun in life damn it.

    The ability to monitor and deal with diabetes gets better and better. We have insulin pens now which are stupid simple as opposed to syringes. I get the same paranoia about diabetes as I do about my contact lenses. If I were stranded on an island and couldn't get contact lenses I'd be screwed. If I were stranded on an island and couldn't get insulin I'd be screwed. I've learned to let stupid paranoid thoughts go away. I need my stuff but I have faith that I'll be able to get my stuff. My heart goes out to anyone who needs stuff and they can't get stuff.

    Anyway..….here's the latest in diabetic handy gizmos.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  13. Hammerhead

    Hammerhead Tele-Meister

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    There really is a huge difference between type 1 and type 2.

    They should give them different names so we type 1 diabetics don't have to deal with judgemental nonsense like the OP.
     
  14. Larry K. Williams

    Larry K. Williams Tele-Meister

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    My mother was diagnosed with Type II at age 46. She will be, hopefully, 82 in November. She does the "eat whatever, and inject as much as needed" thing. The doctor has been on her case about this for a long time. Her thinking is that I should be able to eat whatever I want. Well, she is about to be 82, but it has taken it's toll on her. For about 8 years now, she has started becoming more and more feeble - dependent. Three stents over the last 15 years. Two minor strokes. Maybe just age, who knows. She did stop smoking about 25 years ago.....thankfully.

    Now, I was diagnose at age 46 too. I will be 59 in a few weeks. A1C usually runs from 5.3 - 6.1. Never really been overweight. However, I went to diabetes education classes at local hospital with my wife. They cooked meals right in front of us. Showed us how and what to eat. The secret is that most diabetics can eat anything they want IF DOING THE DIETING CORRECTLY.

    At least for me, it is all about reading labels and carb counting. I eat anything. If I want a Krispy Kreme or two, I have it. BUT-- I know that I can't have something else later. I stick to it and it works. I am on Metformin pills. I am not a maximum dosage. I hope this continues for a long time.

    With the carb counting, I did drop from 209 lbs down to 183 lbs. At 6ft tall, that is pretty much exactly where I need to be....according to our doc.

    About 6 years ago, I had an acquaintance, really old guy, type II, tell me about having 4- 6 oz of red wine at bedtime. Said his doc advised it. I talked to my doctor about it. After about a week, my doc called and said that I should try that for diabetic and cardiac benefits. I hardly ever drink alcohol. So this took some effort, but I tried it. After about a week, my morning BGL was down around 20 points on average. My A1C dropped about .4. So I continue with this and my doc is having other diabetic patients do the same. If you inject insulin, check with your doc first.

    The thing is, you can't really "hard rule" diabetes. It behave a little differently in some folks. The basic rules of management are the same.

    For my mom's side of the family, it is genetic. Goes back generations.

    So, you can "ride the needle" for a long time. It is not really good for your internal organs. But, lots of folks do it.
     
  15. Bill

    Bill Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    Sorry I wasn’t clear enough. I was referring to Type II folks affected by food. Wasn’t at all meaning Type I.
     
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  16. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    i never knew such division (and derision) existed between fellow sufferers
    i'm surprised to learn it, although you'd think I wouldn't be

    i find it sad, nonetheless
     
  17. FerruleCat

    FerruleCat Tele-Holic

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    Very true. Although as a type 2 diabetic (managed without insulin), I'm not a particular fan of judgmental nonsense, either.
     
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  18. regularslinky

    regularslinky Tele-Afflicted

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    We're not machines. In the moment, very, very few people consider the long-term consequences of what they are doing - whether the subject is diet, drugs, sex, money, relationships, etc. It's human nature, and it leads to all kinds of things, good and bad.
     
  19. Hammerhead

    Hammerhead Tele-Meister

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    No, that is a good point.

    It's just tough for me to read stuff like the OP when, without insulin, I would be dead, no matter what I did or ate.

    The same ignorance as displayed by the OP means my son (diagnosed type 1 aged 4) getting jibes about being diabetic because he ate too many sweets.

    Try holding your screaming 4 year old son down and injecting him with insulin, knowing that if you don't, he will be in a coma, before writing the OP.



    That said I don't want to be judgemental about type 2 diabetics eating. It's tough. Same way it was tough for me to stop smoking and tough not to pour another glass of wine right now.
     
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  20. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Telefied Ad Free Member

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    The movie Wall:E

    Our future has been predicted.

    I used to not want to become diabetic because I might end up getting parts of me hacked off and eventually dying like my Bro-in-law Kenny (RIP).

    But now I just don’t want to instantly have to crab at someone or lord my superior form of a disease over a fellow sufferer. Seems cruel ?

     
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