Dealing with Neck Blank Warping

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Slowtwitch, May 10, 2021.

  1. Slowtwitch

    Slowtwitch Tele-Holic

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    I'm making a 2 piece Fender style neck, maple + rosewood FB
    So I thinned the maple neck blank to 3mm from final thickness
    Decided to roast it, and knew going in I'm taking a bit of a chance to roast when the blank is so close to final dims.
    Light roast
    The blank came out with a warp - concave from heel to headstock
    More than the 3mm thickness allows me to flatten out.

    Is it possible to wet the concave side (to expand the fibers that side) and add weights on top of the blank to flatten it out?
    If it does flatten out, will it be stable afterwards and not warp again,
    Or is it fire wood now?
     
  2. Ripthorn

    Ripthorn Friend of Leo's

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    I'm not sure that wetting it will work. The roasting actually changes the structure of the fibers somewhat, so they may or may not take water well. If it is plain maple, I would probably just start with a new blank, as there is no guarantee that it would remain stable.
     
  3. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Just my 2 cents. I wouldn't even use a piece of wood that was warped before I started unless it was thick enough to joint and plane flat to my dimensions and stayed that way for a day or two.
     
  4. Slowtwitch

    Slowtwitch Tele-Holic

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    Well that's what I'm wondering about, it was flat and had/ have a jointed edge before going for baking
     
  5. Peegoo

    Peegoo Poster Extraordinaire

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    Yeah, baking it has changed the structure of the wood. There is no going back.

    Anytine you roast or marinate a chunk of wood, always use a piece that's larger in all dimensions than your final size because it will change its shape.
     
  6. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    I can appreciate your dilemma :).

    I "home roasted" a blank last year and it pretty much went to hell ;).

    It warped when I drove all the moisture out of it in the oven, then it eventually warped even more later on as it began to stabilize to the ambient atmospheric moisture level.


    What I learned -

    The main reason to use torrified wood is because it is more stable.

    "Home roasted" wood is not torrified wood.

    True torrification requires a controlled no-oxygen atmosphere for the "cooking" stage and a controlled cool-down stage with steam introduced to hydrate the wood to a corrected moisture content.




    The big lesson is . . . . :)

    "Home roasting" is a big waste of time and turns good material into junk ;).


    .
     
  7. s_tones

    s_tones Tele-Afflicted

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    Ive tossed 3 or 4 neck blanks for unmanagable warp. such a bummer.
    Just part of the deal I guess.
    Most common for me is top convex due to removal more middle wood than end wood on the backside of a one piece neck.

    3mm isnt too bad.
    What you might do is clamp the neck so that the bow is actually reversed slightly while the fb is glued in place.
    When the glue dries in this position the FB will maintain the new configuration and then the truss rod will aid further in keeping it straight. I have done this with very good results.
     
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  8. Slowtwitch

    Slowtwitch Tele-Holic

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    Well I roasted a few months back from the same stock in the same oven for the same time with great success. BUT I did roast before I thinned the wood so much.
     
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  9. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    That's the best approach :).

    I certainly won't argue with your results.

    I really tried to make "home roasting" work.

    Tried different approaches, but got the same inferior results.

    I've found that "Home roasting" in a kitchen oven will change the color of the wood, but unfortunately it doesn't render more stability to the piece, which is the primary benefit of torrefication.

    I have some torrified neck blanks in my wood stash that are three years old, and they haven't moved or changed one bit from the day I received them regardless of the season. They are just as flat as the day I bought them.

    I also have some air dried and kiln dried neck blanks in my wood stash which are just as old, that change and move a bit from season to season.

    I'm one of those nerds that pay attention to that sort of weird stuff :).


    .
     
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  10. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    I guess I would plane the f/b surface flat and put it away under my work bench. I would want it in an environment where the RH took some pretty big swings so I wouldn't put it with my other wood. In 6 months or a year I'd look at it and if it had remained rock stable might consider building something with it.

    Or not, I see no point in roasting a piece of wood...
     
  11. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

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    I've roasted 3 blanks and had no warping at all. I think it's because I had the wood in my shop for at least 3 years and this area is fairly dry year round and cold in the winter. Maybe your blank wasn't dry enough but I'm guessing.
     
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  12. El Famoso

    El Famoso Tele-Meister

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    I second what s_tones said. I have fixed a warped neck by softening the glue joint between neck and fretboard in the oven while clamped to reverse the warp. Let it cool and between that and the truss rod you can get it nice and flat.

    Of course, this was an experiment on a beater guitar. Your mileage may vary and all that.
     
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  13. Ripthorn

    Ripthorn Friend of Leo's

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    One of my current projects got a very long roast for the maple neck blank. It warped, but I had enough to get rid of it with the jointer and then drum sander.
     
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