Dead ... or passed?

loopfinding

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I always say “passed away” or “passed” if I’m talking to someone, but if it’s me just tell me they died. I don’t believe in any hocus pocus, so euphemisms aren’t going to make me feel any better about it.
 

oregomike

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I can't help noticing the regular stream of posts in Bad Dog observing when someone dies.

I also notice the preferred phrase to use is "X has passed". The might be a regional thing, but I've never used that euphemism, it even sounds odd to my ear, but it must be used in other places. I say, "X is dead". Is it just me? What sounds right to you?

Escaped.
 

esseff

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I've never Tippexed a death by saying 'passed' or 'passed on' and that includes talking about my dead parents and friends who went early for various reasons. I'm not heartless, I prefer to be straightforward.
I'd say, for example, 'Sorry, buddy, bad news, XXXX has died (or been killed in an accident),' if we both had a close connection with the person concerned. If not, I'd say something like: 'Hey, have you heard that XXX XXXXXX is dead?'
 

Chester P Squier

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People at our church will often say that the deceased person "went home." Sometimes they add "to be with the Lord." But usually, "went home."

For about 3 years there, my wife and I were assigned the task of sending mass emails to our Bible study group; newsletters and other news items pertaining to the class.

There was a nonagenarian class member who had been in the hospital for several days, but his health improved to the point that he was released from the hospital. We were asked to announce that to the class.

I came REEAALLL CLOSE to titling the email "Xxx Went Home."

And then just putting "...from the hospital” as the first sentence.
 
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P Thought

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My sister wondered a bit snippily why I hadn't attended later "memorial services" for our mom and our dad. I told her it was because I'd been with each of them when they'd died, and I'd said my goodbyes then.
 

Bendyha

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Bendyha

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From an article in the "huffpost.com - died,passed away or passed.

I spent time going through copies of funeral notices, obituaries, and news stories that I have saved about my family members. I found that the change from "died" to "passed away" began in the early 1970s. The change was gradual, and did not occur at the same time among all funeral homes or newspapers. But by the early 1980s "passed away" was the norm for all obituaries used by funeral homes, while obituaries and stories in newspapers still tended to use "died," although some use "passed away."
 

regularslinky

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Died.

"Passed" suggests that the person succeeded in a test. "Passed away" suggests that there is nothing after this life, and a lot of people disagree. "Passed on" suggests that there is something after this life, and a lot of people disagree. The word you are looking for is "died."
 

Greggorios

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Have heard "passed" or "passed away" as common euphemisms for dying as long as I can remember. It always seemed it was a "softer" way of informing others of someone's "demise". My personal experience is that it tends to go over much better than "croaked".:D
 

BigDaddyLH

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Died.

"Passed" suggests that the person succeeded in a test. "Passed away" suggests that there is nothing after this life, and a lot of people disagree. "Passed on" suggests that there is something after this life, and a lot of people disagree. The word you are looking for is "died."

I've been watching a lot of Korean TV shows on Netflix. Like an unhealthy amount.

And a really common thing for someone to say when they are exasperated is something like, "what evil did I do in a past life to be stuck with you in this one?"
 

Dennyf

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I don't care for "passed." It seems like something my much older, Bible-reading, church-going relatives would have said.

I hear it a lot more now that I live in the Bible Belt than I ever did back home in Pennsylvania. If somebody died, we just said they died. Nobody felt it was particularly harsh just to say so. Although if we were speaking of someone who died a while ago, it was common to say, "Oh, he's been gone for years," rather than "dead for years." But you heard that too.
 

Toto'sDad

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Croaked. Gone under. Wormfood. Bought the farm. Cashed the check. Assumed room temperature.

All very warm, compassionate ways of informing somebody of someone's demise.

Some people are so uncomfortable with death, it makes them nervous to talk about it in ANY terms. To drop DEATH of a loved one on them is sometimes more than they can handle. I have at times been the bearer of such bad news, and on occasion I've made poor choices of words. I have learned from life it is far better to err on the softer side of defining someone leaving this world.
 

Chester P Squier

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From an article in the "huffpost.com - died,passed away or passed.

I spent time going through copies of funeral notices, obituaries, and news stories that I have saved about my family members. I found that the change from "died" to "passed away" began in the early 1970s. The change was gradual, and did not occur at the same time among all funeral homes or newspapers. But by the early 1980s "passed away" was the norm for all obituaries used by funeral homes, while obituaries and stories in newspapers still tended to use "died," although some use "passed away."

Oh, I was hearing "passed away" back in the 1950s, when I was a child. Maybe the expression began in north Louisiana.

I was a kid then. At first, I didn't know the difference between "passed away" and "passed out."

I supposed that would be what is wrong with simply "passed."
 




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