Dead low E-string pole piece on vintage Jaguar pickup?

Discussion in 'Just Pickups' started by gnd567, Jan 23, 2020.

  1. gnd567

    gnd567 Tele-Meister

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    I recently had a beautiful custom made Jaguar guitar built by a luthier friend of mine. We put an original set of 1965 Jaguar pickups in it.

    I have noticed that low E-string is WAY weaker/almost non-existant on the neck pickup. It doesn't matter if its in the lead or rhythm circuit, the low e-string is almost inaudible and the pickup height is adjusted correctly. The bridge pickup is functioning perfectly fine.

    Does anyone know if I might have a dead pole piece on the low E-string of the neck pickup? If so, is there anything I can do save/repair this pickup? Thanks.
     
  2. kbold

    kbold Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    You can remagnetise the pole by attaching a stronger magnet (e.g. rare earth magnet) to the pole. Attach so magnets attract, and leave it there for a while.
    That should fix the problem.
     
  3. gnd567

    gnd567 Tele-Meister

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    I've never heard of that before. It doesn't damage the pickup?
     
    Matthias likes this.
  4. Teleguy61

    Teleguy61 Friend of Leo's

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    From StewMac--
    CHARGE THE MAGNETS
    The polepieces are now ready to be magnetized by passing them between two strong magnets held apart with just enough room to pass the pickup between.

    Option 1: Make a simple fixture using our 5" soundhole clamp. Remove the feet with a screwdriver and attach two of our 1" diameter Guitar Repair Magnets with #20 Super Glue. Orient the magnets so that they pull toward each other, and adjust the magnets so they are 1" apart. Identify and mark the north/south polarity for reference.

    [​IMG]
    Fender Strat pickups were always "north up" until 1960 when they became south up. Use our Magnet Polarity Tester to determine a magnet's polarity.

    Option 2: For an adjustable-width magnetizing fixture, our Nut and Saddle Vise #1816 works well. Since the jaws are steel, the Guitar Repair Magnets hold themselves in place without glue. This lets you adjust for different pickups and different proximity by simply opening and closing the vise.

    [​IMG]
    The Guitar Repair Magnets will charge the magnets to their full capacity of 20-25 Gauss. Several passes through the magnets does the job; move the pickup as slowly as you can while keeping it free of the magnets. To determine a magnet's strength, we recommend the analog Model 25 Magnetometer (50-0-50 gauss range) available from the R.B. Annis Company. It works well and is reasonably priced.
     
  5. hopdybob

    hopdybob Tele-Afflicted

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    could it be something is wrong in the wiring so it has a basscut?
     
  6. TimTam

    TimTam Tele-Holic

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    Assuming you don't have access to a magnetometer (eg WT10A) to actually measure the pole piece's field strength, there's probably 2-3 things I would do prior to concluding that the pole piece has lost magnetization ...
    1. Connect the pickup direct to your cable / amp (eg using alligator clip test leads). You should be able to do that by simply unscrewing the lead plate and connecting to the neck pickup switch (with the rhythm circuit switched off). Or you can do the same at the neck pickup side of the rhythm/lead switch (regardless of the switch position) ...
    https://www.fmicassets.com/Damroot/Original/10002/pickup_set_099-2238A_SISD.pdf
    2. Rotate the pickup around so that the current low E pole is then under the high E (a jag pickup is symmetrical and should present no impediments to doing that).
    The following is a similar test, but probably redundant if you've done #2 ...
    3. Swap the neck and bridge pickups (from that era they are possibly? RWRP when both on, but otherwise basically the same pickup).
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2020
  7. Matthias

    Matthias Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    I’ve needed to do that.

    My low E an High E poles on my neck Jag pup came out of the factory too weak. I checked polarity with a compass and used an n42 neodymium disc magnet on top of the poles as kbold describes. I moved to back and forth over all of them with a sheet of paper in between to avoid marking the covers.
     
  8. gnd567

    gnd567 Tele-Meister

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    Ok. We're rehearsing tomorrow and I'm gonna talk to my bassist/luthier and we will probably first try what TimTam was saying and if we have to, we may resort to what kbold described.
     
  9. gnd567

    gnd567 Tele-Meister

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    UPDATE:

    Problem solved!

    My luthier figured out the problem. It had something to do with the wiring/rhythm circuit. Thankfully everything works great now.
     
    hopdybob likes this.
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