De-glossing a glossy maple neck (and body?)

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by Telecaster88, Aug 14, 2019.

  1. Telecaster88

    Telecaster88 Tele-Meister

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    I'm currently looking at picking up a 2007 Classic 72 Tele Thinline. I've always been a rosewood guy, mainly because I dislike the thick glossy finish Fender uses on their maple necks and boards. The only maple board I own is on a deluxe strat, and it's a satin finish that's feels great and is very playable.

    If I do get the thinline I'm willing to give the glossy neck a chance. I know some people love them, and I've heard that once broken in they get nice and smooth. I've only ever played them on new guitars in shops.

    If I don't ever get on with the gloss, I know some of you have had success taking fine steel wool to it. Any tips? Is that the kind of thing an idiot like me can pull off without ruining things?

    The body too (it's one of the natural ash bodies) has that super thick poly coating. Is it possible to take steel wool to that too, or is that a bridge too far?

    Thanks, just ideas I'm kicking around.
     
  2. DrPepper

    DrPepper Tele-Afflicted

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    Green Scotchbrite, or 2000 grit sandpaper...
     
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  3. Telecaster88

    Telecaster88 Tele-Meister

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    Thank you! But you missed the most important part of my question... Is it something an idiot like me can pull off? :p
     
  4. DrPepper

    DrPepper Tele-Afflicted

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    Yes, and that answer comes from another idiot like yourself...
     
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  5. DrPepper

    DrPepper Tele-Afflicted

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    I would avoid steel wool, that metal dust can get into places you wish it hadn't... Unless you take proper precautions...
     
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  6. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    avoid steel wool near a guitar. chips get stuck in the pickups and grind away at the bobbin wire.

    go to an automotive parts store and get 800 grit or higher sandpaper. If you get to the point you want to sell the guitar then you use 1500-2000+ followed by polishing compound.

    Don't sand down to the wood. just to get a satin look, feel.

    masking tape where you are stopping the sanding, like at the back of the headstock. you get a clean break line that way.

    .
     
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  7. magicfingers99

    magicfingers99 Tele-Afflicted

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    Norton SoftTouch sanding sponge. p1500-p1200

    microfine sanding, will take the gloss off and leave the finish, great for making your neck faster too. I've used it on a dozen guitar necks.

    it can be used wet (recommend that for the body) or dry, if you use it dry, rinse it out regularly, it will load up fast.

    https://www.nortonabrasives.com/sga-common/files/document/Flyer-Sponges-SoftTouch-NortonAA-7835.pdf

    cheapest I've found is amazon by the box.

    if you just want a sponge or 2 to try it out, these folks sell onesies

    https://www.woodcraft.com/products/norton-softouch-superfine-sanding-sponge-1200-1500-grit

    (never bought from them) rockler probably sells them as well as other wood working stores..

    upload_2019-8-14_12-36-35.jpeg
     
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