de-burring holes in a steel chassis (tool rec?)

Discussion in 'Amp Tech Center' started by LudwigvonBirk, Oct 9, 2017.

  1. LudwigvonBirk

    LudwigvonBirk Tele-Holic

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    Hi

    I am drilling a few holes in a steel chassis, using a drill press (*with one exception, power hand drill for that one).

    Drill hole entries are clean and fine. Drill hole exits typically have ragged little metal burrs, which are tricky to neatly remove. I have a small de-burring flat file which works ok (other than scratching up my chassis a little).

    Does anybody have a favorite hand tool or technique for cleaning up the drill hole exits?

    thanks!

    [moderator, a-ok to move this thread if there's a more appropriate forum for it, thx]
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2017
  2. xafinity

    xafinity Friend of Leo's

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    common machinists deburing tool
     
  3. clintj

    clintj Friend of Leo's

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    Other options: half round files (both single and double cut recommended to do it most effectively), Dremel, or a machinists file set - those little 4" long ones are excellent for detail work.
     
  4. Sconnie

    Sconnie Tele-Afflicted

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    You can either use a larger drill bit to kind of chamfer the edge of your holes, or one of these tools:

    [​IMG] this is good for small holes.

    [​IMG] this is good for big holes and open edges.

    Home depot might have the latter, the former is much more specific, Fastenal or similar shops should carry them.
     
  5. Sconnie

    Sconnie Tele-Afflicted

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    Tool required? Not necessarily, but that conical tool I posted above is a great investment and will pay dividends over and over from sheer convenience. You should be able to find one that comes on a handle like the other tool I posted.

    Most of the guys in the workshop I'm employed by don't deburr any holes they drill, which infuriates me. So I'm glad there are some other people out there care about fit and finish, and giving a damn haha! Then again, maybe my dad was just crazy and what I learned in my garage as an 8 year old was very far from the norm.
     
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  6. xafinity

    xafinity Friend of Leo's

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    upload_2017-10-9_9-48-46.png
     
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  7. Brokenpick

    Brokenpick Tele-Afflicted

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    It's amazing, how the old-school stuff, or caring workmanship that your dad or some other craftsman showed you as a kid can just plain RUIN you for putting up with all the hurried and improper stuff you see later in life.

    "... level on the level, shaved even every door..."

    I mean, I know it's not cost effective to care for your tools and take your time, and turn out careful work.... but dang. Once you're seen it or been taught that way... you'll be unhappy livin' in the real world! (especially if you're paying somebody to do something!)
     
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  8. Cleeve

    Cleeve Tele-Holic

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    I sometimes use a step drill bit in a cordless drill to de-burr.
     
  9. clintj

    clintj Friend of Leo's

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    A very big +1. I worked in jobs heavily invested with QA for years, building and repairing gear for steam driven machinery and on submarines. That willingness to take the time to verify clearances, hand fit parts, and do it right the first time makes a big difference in how well things work and last. It bugs me constantly at work when corners get cut and Maintenance says "eh, close enough". Like the faucet below. The handle goes from full right to straight ahead when you change the temperature setting. I still shake my head every time I use it.[​IMG]
     
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  10. Sconnie

    Sconnie Tele-Afflicted

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    I've learned this a bit already, don't worry. I shake my head often and wonder if I'm the only observant person around here. I refuse to change though! I'm better than that!
     
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  11. 2 Headed Goat

    2 Headed Goat Friend of Leo's

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    this is good for small holes.

    [​IMG] this is good for big holes and open edges.

    [/QUOTE]

    This is good for… probably no(thing) good.


    IMG_9853.JPG
     
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  12. MickM

    MickM Friend of Leo's Platinum Supporter

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    From my machine shop teacher at vo-tech who could find a sharp burr on a bar of soap to my perfectionist father I learned that half-assed is just that. Since learning their lessons many years ago I've many times both cursed them for my critical eye and the expectation that everybody should aspire to turn out nothing but their best and respect and thank them for doing the same. To this day I'm sometimes the butt of my friends jokes for taking the time to retrieve the right tool, change the speed on a drill press, or just do what needs done to do something right.
     
  13. Sconnie

    Sconnie Tele-Afflicted

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    Honestly there are times when guys like us don't benefit from the extra effort, but when things go wrong cause you didn't change the speed on the drill press is when we get the last laugh!

    I'm the only guy in my shop that taps holes by hand 99% of the time, everyone else always uses a drill and 90% of the time they're fine, but I always laugh to myself when I hear a tap snap off halfway into a hole haha. I like those small victories in my head cause now that guy is gonna waste half an hour trying to salvage the situation rather than taking an extra 60 seconds to tap it by hand in the first place.
     
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  14. mherrcat

    mherrcat Tele-Holic

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    You need a chamfer tool. If you use a larger drill bit you run the risk of the bit grabbing the metal and mangling it.

    https://www.midwayusa.com/chamfer-and-deburring-tools/br?cid=8936
     
  15. ce24

    ce24 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I just use a larger bit and gently dill the hole till the burr is gone....usually just touch will do.
     
  16. E5RSY

    E5RSY Doctor of Teleocity

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  17. gourmetsaint

    gourmetsaint Tele-Meister

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    I just bought one like this. My 5e3 chassis is too tight to get anything in from this inside where the burrs are. The octel socket holes are 30mm too.[​IMG]
     
  18. LudwigvonBirk

    LudwigvonBirk Tele-Holic

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    I just bought one of these today (the yellow one), will give it a whirl.
    ...
    Not to hijack a thread I started, but what process does a pro/factory use to cut the holes (some of which are not round) in a steel chassis?
     
  19. clintj

    clintj Friend of Leo's

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    There are punches for things like strain relief, octal and noval socket, and light/fuse holes. If you deal with an upscale machine shop, they may have water jet or laser cutters for quick, accurate sheet metal cutting.
     
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  20. RodeoTex

    RodeoTex Poster Extraordinaire

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    I like the 'conical' tool as mentioned above. Either in a battery drill or rig up a file handle to do it by hand.
    I've always heard them called a countersink. The five fluted ones are great for doing very smooth champers. Most of the single flute and cheaper ones tend to chatter and leave a wavy chamfer.
    Titanium coating is a plus, still under $20.
    These are also the perfect angle for countersinking screw holes in pickguards, etc.
     
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