Danelectro style Tele Build

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by sjohnbruton, Jun 1, 2012.

  1. walcen

    walcen TDPRI Member

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    Hi John I'm new here and I was just wondering if you could use the same jig with the cutoff curves to make your radius block.

    regards

    Walt
     
  2. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I'm not John, but I know a thing or two about these radius jigs. To make a radius block with a radius type jig, the rails that go over the pipes would need to be like a rocking chair legs.....that is shaped like a smile...not a frown as the radius jig. Some guys have taken the design and made interchangeable curves to do just that sort of thing.

    This is what most do.

     
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  3. walcen

    walcen TDPRI Member

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    Hi Marty

    Yes indeed this is what I was suggesting, take the frowny bits off and replace them with the matching smiley bits that came off the frowny bits.

    Thanks for the video its a very clever way of making radius blocks, I use a safe-t planer in a drill press and tilt that table to give me the desired radius. It seems to work well for me.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. sjohnbruton

    sjohnbruton Tele-Holic

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    Yeah, what Marty said...!

    Walt, the Safe-T Planer trick has me intrigued...

    Did you noodle through the geometry before hand? Or just "trial and error" it until you hit the right radius?

    John
     
  5. walcen

    walcen TDPRI Member

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    Hi John

    I made a revered radius gauge out of aluminum to give me a reference point first. I used a cad program to print out the radius, glued it to 2mm aluminum sheet and cut it out. I took a swag (scientific wild ass guess) at the drill press table angle, and ran some scrap timber through a couple of times, it only took 5 minutes or so, 10 to 15 min to complete the whole job.

    Hope this helps

    Walt
     
  6. sjohnbruton

    sjohnbruton Tele-Holic

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    Yes, it does. So, do you know the table angle that produces a 12" radius? That is what I'm shooting for.

    John
     
  7. walcen

    walcen TDPRI Member

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    Hi John, I did not write it down because I only needed one but I'll try to have an answer for you in a couple of hours or more, I'm having surgery on my elbow today so thing will be a bit slow LOL.
     
  8. sjohnbruton

    sjohnbruton Tele-Holic

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    Dang, man! I'll say a prayer for you in hopes that it all goes well. Get well quick!

    John
     
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  9. walcen

    walcen TDPRI Member

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    Ok, if you start at 9 to 9.5 deg you should be pretty much there, I'd lean more toward 9.5. I measured this on the drill press gauge and confirmed it with a digital Wixey angle gauge. If you don't have a digital Wixey angle gauge, get one they're inexpensive and a great tool for guitar building.
    [​IMG]
     
  10. sjohnbruton

    sjohnbruton Tele-Holic

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    Well crap! Now I want another tool that I didn't even know I needed! Thanks.

    John
     
  11. ModerneGuy

    ModerneGuy Tele-Holic

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    Don't forget that there a number of apps for your phone that are accurate and will help you with getting the angle. I use one called Clinometer on the iPhone. Just don't let your phone slide off the drill press table!
     
  12. sjohnbruton

    sjohnbruton Tele-Holic

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    Great tip! I'll look that one up. Thanks!

    John
     
  13. walcen

    walcen TDPRI Member

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    Yep I've use some of the apps available, however this tool is small, has a square magnetic base and will sit flat on anything. it takes up very little space in a drawer and it's nice to have a dedicated tool that you don't need to fiddle with to use. But hey, it's only my humble opinion and I'm stupid and don't do apps very well, I think it's called technophobic thing y something LOL.

    Walt
     
  14. ModerneGuy

    ModerneGuy Tele-Holic

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    Walt, I don't doubt a dedicated tool would be best. Some of the similar ones I googled looked to be at least as big as a phone - something small that fits in a guitar's neck pocket would great! Just putting another option out there. Cheers.
     
  15. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Being curious about this, I drew a 2.75" circle in my Cad program and rotated it 9.5 degrees . You get the shape in Red. Then I plotted 3 points and drew a curve. Then I analyzed the radius of the curve and it comes out to about 7.05". I'm sure you could dial in a different angle to achieve something else too. The problem I see is getting the cutter horizontal. This may be possible on a radial drill press or radial arm saw with a chuck on the end, but I don't know about a tilting table. Mine doesn't tilt at all, so I'm out...LOL.


    [​IMG]
    A table saw tilted probably would come close too using the molding method.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=cutting+cove+molding+on+a+table+saw&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjpgv3Y1vzMAhWCDz4KHVW0CVcQ_AUICSgD&biw=1920&bih=849#imgrc=sDFAKiWsDzDbhM:
     
  16. sjohnbruton

    sjohnbruton Tele-Holic

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    Marty,

    Thanks for the graphic. I guess I will just have to trial and error it until I home in on the 12" radius. I'm sure there are folks out there that could do the math, but I'm not one of those folks!

    I've seen the table saw cove trick before, but never had the need (or been brave enough) to try it!

    John
     
  17. u6crash

    u6crash TDPRI Member

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    Okay, I'm bumping this thread.

    First, let me say thank you for documenting all of this. I had this idea to do a similarly constructed guitar (plywood sides, glued on top and back) and had NO IDEA that this is how the original Danelectros were done. The wide band on the sides totally makes sense now! I was thinking if quality birch plywood was used that you could even fill in any voids, sand it smooth, and finish it that way. I know a guy that makes tube amps with birch ply and in certain views the plys on the end grain is totally visible. And if I recall this wasn't totally uncommon in certain furniture designs of the 50s and 60s.

    Part of my idea was just as you described earlier (I've read all 12 pages now) and keep it the body light. The second part was to make a great sounding guitar out of "less than ideal" materials/methods. The only thing is that I don't have birch plywood available locally, but oddly enough I live near a hardwood distributor so I can probably build with a solid hardwood more affordably than I can have birch panels shipped to me. I'd also planned to use wood instead of hardboard.

    The third thing I'd considered using this method was doing three different body sizes, jumbo semi-hollow, medium/standard electric, and tiny/cigar box size body, nesting the designs in one another and getting the best bang for your buck out of the plywood. Obviously you wouldn't be able to use the attached bridge block in that fashion as you have done, but still, it's a thought. I haven't drawn it out to see how feasible it is.

    Anyway, where is this guitar now? It's December 2016, let's see it! You're so close!

    Thanks again for this thread. It's definitely renewed interest in my idea.
     
  18. sjohnbruton

    sjohnbruton Tele-Holic

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    Wow! Thanks for the appreciation! I'm glad found something worthwhile here!

    This project has (again) been sent to the back burner for a bit...

    The body is painted, but I've been rethinking the neck recently. Also, my carport workshop is full of junk and storage at the moment.

    I'm hoping to get going on this one again soon! Thanks for the props!

    John
     
  19. stratguy23

    stratguy23 TDPRI Member

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    Hey I also had an idea to do a Dano Tele build and found yours. I read this entire thread. This is such a cool build, and I was just wondering if there have been any new updates!
     
  20. crazygtr

    crazygtr TDPRI Member

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    Yep, we're still here.
     
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