D-G-C-F... any of you do it?

FortyEight

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My jazz is tuned this way right now and I like it. I think I'm gonna try and keep a bass with this tuning all the time. My perception is I may just convert both basses eventually. However, I'm pretty sure I need thicker strings. Then again maybe I will want both....

I think it would be a good tuning for the country band I play in. It would be good for my own music too. I like it better than the idea of learning how to play a 5 string. I tried that once a while back and I was a bit confused all the time. LOL. I barely would ever use the 5 string and it was heavier. It seemed like a waste and it was more frustrating than anything. But it was the church's bass that I played at and I wasn't able to take it home and practice on it.

I'm actually playing a lot more than I did then, so I could likely learn a 5 string too likely. But for now I think I'm gonna go down this route.....

I'm being recommended to try 55s. Will those suffice? Curious if any of you do this tuning on a shorter scale bass too?????

Do any of you use 55's with standard tuning?

I'm still not liking flats, whenever I try them at a store on a bass. It just feels wrong to me. ESPECIALLY now that I'm playing with my fingers. LOL.
 

pbenn

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You have a point, but you're right, you'll need a bigger big E (D) string to avoid flap.
But if you have a singer who can't quite manage the keys on the record, you're all set to "take it down a little," assuming a similar down-tuning from the guitarist.

Lots of music is Eb tuning ("Wrap It Up" Sam & Dave, etc.) or dropped D (Neil Young, Steve Earle) or even C (Chain of Fools).

OTOH, unless you want to sound like a '90s grunge band, you'll have to be careful of the "doom" dimension.
 

FortyEight

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i dont normally play open strings much. maybe at the end of a song. a few ither times. i dont THINK it will be too much of an issue. Ive heard other country bass players use this tuning. i definitely like it for my own song im working on now. not country. dont even know how to categorize it. my stuff is pop rock i guess.

but yeah, the 4th string is floppy. especially above 7th fret.
 

mexicanyella

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I think the “unintentional 90s grunge factor” would be a bigger deal if you were tuning to Drop D. Then you would have the hard-to-resist temptation to work that low fifth between the lowest two strings. Even though you wouldn’t be playing guitar-style double stops on a bass that low, you would still find yourself doing little ornamentation moves and fills that suggest Drop D rock moves from that era.

At least that’s what happened immediately when I tuned to drop D on bass.

But you’re talking about lowering the entire bass to D standard. The expected shapes and intervals will remain intact; you’re just lowering the range a whole step. I think the perceived effect will be less obvious to listeners, and you’ll have the option to throw in a few downward moves in some keys, without the whole “Ohhh, yeah, there’s that five action” or “Hey, Creed just walked in” effect.
 

marshman

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A decade or so ago I put a year into really learning 5-string bass. I worked out every song our band played, more than a dozen 'back pocket' tunes, etc, but I really NEVER felt like that low B sounded right. I have a Hipshot bass extender key set for D on my main gigging bass and have found that is as low as I really need to go. Standard D would probably be interesting, but I just got a baritone guitar and I need all the bandwidth I can spare right now.

I also spent a lot of years playing pick-up and would probably not be able to follow along if my bass weren't tuned to match the guitars.
 
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Killing Floor

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Never have. But that’s an interesting idea.
If you have trouble finding strings I bet Stringjoy could help. Shoot them a message.
 

tfarny

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No, but it sounds cool! I wish more bass players used 5ths tuning (DAEB or something), I feel like it could open up the instrument a bit. I may give that a shot one day but I'm not really a bass player. Maybe there is some good reason nobody does that.
 

FortyEight

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yeah in the country band most stuff would just get played a step up. until i wanted to throw in some lower notes.

im not sure it would do a lot in the country band. but im all over it for my own music. it opens up doors for new sounds. plus everything just sounds and feels different. place i stopped yesterday didnt have 55-110s. so i didnt get any yet. then i played a used american jazz with flats and it was the first time ive liked flats so far. they hsd purple cloth at the top. but it got me ti thinking if i should try flats instead of thicker rounds....

either way im gonna try it. likely i will just get some rounds. they are cheaper.
 

Matt G

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My jazz is tuned this way right now and I like it. I think I'm gonna try and keep a bass with this tuning all the time. . . I think it would be a good tuning for the country band I play in. It would be good for my own music too. I like it better than the idea of learning how to play a 5 string. . . .
I hope it works for you, but it's not my bag. I'd need to relearn the four string, etc. As it is, I wanted to be able to play a fretted low E, and being mindful that a fair number of players use the five string bass these days, I just broke down and got one. Very happy with it. As a side note, my four string has a drop-D Hipshot gadget on it too. Works fine, and string tension's OK too. For the kind of stuff I play, keeping a separate instrument tuned DGCF would be too much of an extravagance. That said, it'd be interested to hear how DGCF works for you in your country band. I can see how it might fit that sweet spot between standard four- and five strings while playing under drop-D tunes, without necessarily having to buy a new bass (or keep switching them around either).
 

FortyEight

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I hope it works for you, but it's not my bag. I'd need to relearn the four string, etc. As it is, I wanted to be able to play a fretted low E, and being mindful that a fair number of players use the five string bass these days, I just broke down and got one. Very happy with it. As a side note, my four string has a drop-D Hipshot gadget on it too. Works fine, and string tension's OK too. For the kind of stuff I play, keeping a separate instrument tuned DGCF would be too much of an extravagance. That said, it'd be interested to hear how DGCF works for you in your country band. I can see how it might fit that sweet spot between standard four- and five strings while playing under drop-D tunes, without necessarily having to buy a new bass (or keep switching them around either).
it might take me some time to transition it into the country band.

my other dilemma with that is when i started using the cv jass bass, there were complaints about the tone from the lead singer and drummer and steel guy. part of that was cuz we changed systems and the new one didnt sound as beefy with my bass through it.

but its also true that my jazz doesnt do what my p does. im not gonna mess with my p until i would know its something i wanna do for sure. so i would need a bass that people like the sound of to transition. so part of me wants to trade my jazz for a p.

the other part of me likes the jazz for my stuff. PLUS, bigger strings on the jazz MAY give it some more low end.

but the output on my p is like 10.6. jazz pups are 6.7 ish........

the jazz is heavier and i actually feel it when im playing out. our set is 3 hours. we do take a break so i could learn half the songs with the new tuning.

but like i said, im already planning on using it for my own stuff.
 

marshman

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I also have a Kubicki X-factor, with it's extended fretboard under the E string. I really love it, but it just looks so wrong in a Classic Rock setting.
 

FortyEight

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todays get. its worth a try....
 

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FortyEight

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nothing. just doesnt have a low eflat and d. and its something new to try out to keep it fresh. whats wrong with a different tuning than e standard??
 

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TomBrokaw

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I'm a guitar player who also owns a couple of basses. One's in standard, the other is ADAD, to match my 7 string which is in ADADGBE. The low A is a .160 that I got from Kalium. It's at a good feeling tension but noticeably thick. The doom factor is the point, in my case.
 




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