Custom 50's style Flying V

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by joekumpan3, Jan 3, 2017.

  1. ftitele

    ftitele TDPRI Member

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    Ouch! I only got 1 thin crack ... but I had no idea where it came from. Now I guess it must have been from the staining. I wanted to make sure that the crack didn't spread further so I just used some thin CA glue. I had to scrape it all the way back because the glue kept the re-stain from taking. That seemed to work for me. But I cannot say whether CA glue is the way to go for your case.
     
  2. Matt1011

    Matt1011 TDPRI Member

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    I'll do ya one better. I was installing the ferrules and cracked the whole body from the bridge pickup route to the crotch. I forgot to counter sink them as well and have gouges from the screw driver trying to pry them out which I did successfully. CA worked with the sawdust as FYI. Just sucks because I was to the intonation stage as well as drilling out the rest of my holes for the PG and jack too. Here I go with the sanding again. I had it stained just to where I wanted it too. Oh well. It's good practice I guess. :(
     
  3. Matt1011

    Matt1011 TDPRI Member

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    Can anyone post the wiring scheme? I'm at my wit's end and get nothing but hum with mine. I wired it exactly as I was supposed to but all I have is buzz. Anyone have anything for this 58 v build? I'm almost at the finish line but the wiring is killing me. I notice a greater hum when I touch the switch but that's it. Please help? Thanks!
     
  4. John Nicholas

    John Nicholas Friend of Leo's

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    I had a very similar problem, have you confirmed that the input jack wires are on correctly? I had them reversed!
     
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  5. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Silver Supporter

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  6. Matt1011

    Matt1011 TDPRI Member

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    I'm fairly certain I have them right. The ground is the most forward top lug and the tip is below that. My jack is mono. It may just be bad solder. It's a mess under there but what I was looking at told me to ground it to one central location so I used the neck volume pot. It's difficult because I've never wired up a circuit this complicated, and i really don't know the "rules" when it comes to closing a circuit. Are my grounds too close can they all touch? It's frustrating to say the least. Thanks for the help. I appreciate it.
     

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  7. AAT65

    AAT65 Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Don’t be ‘fairly certain’, make sure! If you’ve got a multimeter then buzz it out: if you haven’t then get one!
     
  8. John Nicholas

    John Nicholas Friend of Leo's

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    Looking at your wiring, it sort of looks like you may have an issue with the switch wiring. Depending on the wiring diagram you are working from, the posts can be different.

    1240_allswitches.jpg

    I would also confirm the wiring of your pickups. Depending on the maker of the pickups, the color of the wires can be mixed around.

    [​IMG]

    I would also check for cold solder joints. It's not a problem for the grounds to touch each other. Just make sure none of the grounds are touching anything they're not supposed to.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2017
  9. Matt1011

    Matt1011 TDPRI Member

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    Running to Lowes on my lunch today. The one I have is old and doesn't work well. I guess that's the only way of sorting it out. So frustrating but it's good experience I suppose. You guys have been super helpful. Thanks so much!
     
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  10. Matt1011

    Matt1011 TDPRI Member

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    I'm using Gibson 57 classics so the braided shielding is the ground. I wish it were the other way because it's a pain in the neck to solder them upside down. Then flip it over. That's why it's such a mess. I see why they changed the design to the rear approach in the later models. This is the diagram I used.

     
  11. awasson

    awasson Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    It looks to me like you need a higher wattage soldering iron (I’ve been there). Your grounds are probably ok. Hard to say from the picture. The hum your describing sounds like the jack is wired backwards as has been suggested.
     
  12. Matt1011

    Matt1011 TDPRI Member

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    It's adjustable and I get it pretty hot. Think it gets up to 60W? I'm still trying to get a feel for it. It is a mess but I'll settle for it working at this point. I appreciate the input. I'll try reversing the jack.
     
  13. awasson

    awasson Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    60 Watts is fine. I’ve got an adjustable up to 60 now but I’ve had those radio shack budget 15 watt irons in the past and they’ll definitely get in the way of doing a good job. I’ve been soldering since I was about 10 years old and maybe earlier. My dad is a big tube amp hi fi nut so we always had electronic things to fool around with and I got hooked early.

    The trick to soldering is to heat the area you want the solder to flow to and then apply the solder to the opposite side to where the iron is. The solder will flow towards the heat. So on the back of a potentiometer, I’ll have 3 or 4 ground wires on the pot and place my iron on top of the wires. Then after maybe 3-5 seconds of heat, I’ll apply the solder to the pot, right beside the wires and it will get wicked right up to the tip or the iron. Then I’ll replace the soldering iron with a flat head screw driver to hold the wires in place and absorb some of the heat.
     
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  14. Matt1011

    Matt1011 TDPRI Member

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    That is exactly the issue I'm having, the wicking! This was hard for me being everything is upside down. When I eyeballed the leads, I cut them too short. Well not too short, but too short to easily work them to the pots. So I was really struggling. I'm looking at it now and will test it all with a multimeter. I'm almost positive I have the jack wired correctly. The top groind lug going to ground and ring to the switch. I'll switch them anyway just to see I guess. Thanks again. I'll let you all know how it goes.
     
  15. Matt1011

    Matt1011 TDPRI Member

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    So I tried reversing the jack. It gave me an even worse buzz. I only get sound when I touch the switch and tap the pickups with tweezers. It still buzzes though. I'm lost. Should I undo it and start over?
     
  16. Matt1011

    Matt1011 TDPRI Member

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    I think I tracked the problem to the switch. I used a multimeter and I get current from the ring of the jack to the switch. I go to the bridge ground and nothing, pickups don't make any sound. I get current from the pickups to all the pots. Did I ruin the switch with this solder burn? I also notice there are 2 lugs pushed together on the diagram I followed. Does the single lug of the switch I have have any bearing on that?
     

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  17. Matt1011

    Matt1011 TDPRI Member

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    I know I'm getting annoying about this but I find that there is no current from the single lug on the switch to any other points except the ring on the jack, not even itself. Can the switch be bad? I'm getting current from all pots to ground, both pickups to all pots, all pots to each other, etc... I'm losing my mind over this.
     
  18. awasson

    awasson Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    It couldn’t be that the switch is bad, got damaged or it could be the wrong switch for the job. I can’t really tell from the photos. When you say you’re measuring current, I think you mean you’re measuring continuity, right? As in, you’re measuring from one part to another, hoping for a very low resistance reading which means the connection is good.

    I’d disconnect everything and start from scratch. I’ve done that numerous times and it always makes for a better job. It’s like doing a sand back and refinish but way easier and less time consuming.

    You’re doing the two volumes, one tone circuit, right? If so, I’d use this diagram (the link from @guitarbuilder ): https://guitarelectronics.com/2-hum...tch-2-volumes-1-tone/#PhotoSwipe1511336159255

    The wiring in the diagram at the link above is dead easy. Give it a try and let us know how you make out.
     
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  19. jonrpick

    jonrpick Friend of Leo's

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    The single lug on the switch (closest to the camera) is the frame of the switch. That's ground if you choose to connect it.
     
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