Creativity (How to stay inspired?)

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by superjam144, May 26, 2020.

  1. Sounds Good

    Sounds Good Tele-Holic

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    I some times noodle to get started and just try and maybe find a new lick, i just find it helps get my mind and fingers in gear it takes a while now for me.
     
  2. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    -Block the trem/only play hard tail guitars (so no distractions from dive bombs nor time spent chasing tuning issues or why no tuning issues)

    -Rummage in the back of the closet for a guitar you haven't played in a while, it's like buying a new guitar but cheaper. Same with an amp you haven't used for a long while.

    -Buy a looper pedal. A cheap basic one. I picked up a Kokko (Ammoon) clone of a Ditto Mini for $35 new off Amazon. Now you can create a band to gig with.

    .
     
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  3. matrix

    matrix Tele-Meister

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    Take a lesson - I don't think you are a beginner. I regularly buy courses on Truefire. I enjoy browsing the selection, picking something that excites me and will stretch me as a musician, and then working through it. It has kept me away from plateaus for the last 5 years or so (in which I have advanced as a musician far more than in the previous 20).

    Also, +1 on the new instrument. I picked up a decent but relatively inexpensive keyboard, and am teaching myself piano basics with a course. Absolutely inspiring experience for me. I realize it is a cliche, but now I am living the truth of it - the piano really lays out western music in the most logical possible way. I am getting new theory insights, new ideas, and constantly cross-pollinating those with the guitar. Also, reading. Man, it is way easier to learn to read on a piano (even with a bass clef added in) when each note just shows up once on the instrument. I feel way less stupid about my failed attempts to learn to sight-read on the guitar.
     
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  4. gregj1964

    gregj1964 Tele-Meister

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  5. Ian T

    Ian T Tele-Afflicted

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    A lot of people talking about stuff that isn't really coming from that creative side of the mind.

    Sitting down with a structured, goal oriented approach, man, that sounds like pure drudgery of classical training, the least creative players that there are. I did get a useless classical performance degree years ago so I know a little about that side, too.

    Creativity comes from letting go, being totally present, getting in touch with the inner muse.

    For years, musicians have used mind altering substances to inspire creativity, and suffered the consequences. There are meditative techniques as well for a healthy approach.

    Sometimes just putting on a cool drum loop in Drum Genius Iphone app or putting a metronome on 2 and 4 helps me "wake up" rather than resorting to booze or other substances to get me in the mood.

    I also feel like you have to find the right time of day. For me, early mornings or very late at night are usually better times.

    It sucks to be uninspired, and when I am, I'll often fixate on gear which doesn't solve the problem. Probably the most important element is to just play, put energy into it, push through the low point and see what happens. Taking breaks from the instrument also helps.
     
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  6. cyclopean

    cyclopean Friend of Leo's

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    it's 2020 - if you have broadband you have most recorded music at your fingertips.

    i've been trying to learn more about neu deutsche welle, 80s french and belgian coldwave, and 80s electro.
     
  7. DHart

    DHart Friend of Leo's

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    And... one more thought... a lot of people focus largely on scales, which is great.

    But, if you're weak on arpeggios... that's your ticket to all new realms of creativity - try this: figure out the arpeggio to each chord in a progression and do so all in the same area of the neck. Then as the progression moves along, work within the arpeggio for each chord - all keeping your hand in about the same place on the neck - mid neck is a good place to start. This can be a little challenging, at first, then rewarding, and fun.

    This ability comes in extremely handy for soloing when a chord progression does not neatly fall within a key signature. And helps find a melody which fits perfectly within a given chord progression, especially when chord changes shift in and out of key.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2020
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  8. bftfender

    bftfender Friend of Leo's

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    Catalinbread Karma Suture>belle epoch>68 fender Bassman w/closed back 2x12
     
  9. superjam144

    superjam144 Tele-Holic

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    I really want to get better at comping. But playing jazz for me is like pulling teeth.
     
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  10. matrix

    matrix Tele-Meister

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    I have a fix for that:

    https://truefire.com/jazz-guitar-lessons/jazz-comping-survival-guide/c121

    If you want to get better at jazz comping, nobody will make it easier for you that Fareed Haque. No financial interest, just the guy is a genius teacher and I want to share that. This will bust some ruts for you.
     
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  11. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    learn a style totally opposite to the one you play
     
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  12. Jeremy_Green

    Jeremy_Green TDPRI Member

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    Honestly for me the solution is simple - write your own stuff. Do it for an exercise. Do it in different styles, genres. The more you do it the better you get at it. Get yourself a recording DAW and start cranking em out. Want to jam over a backing track? Make your own! Your holes are very exposed when you do so - making the path much clearer with regards to what you need to work on.
     
  13. rand z

    rand z Friend of Leo's

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    BE CURIOUS.

    Check out what's going on around you... especially people.

    My creativity stems directly from my curiosity.

    I've always been an extremely curious person and I've used it to feed/fuel my songwriting.

    It's been that way for over 40 years and 250+ songs.

    ...............................................................................................

    My guitar/bass/harmonica/vocal has been influenced by many musicians.

    Again, BE CURIOUS and listen to everybody.

    A lot can be learned from everyone...
     
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  14. Stringbanger

    Stringbanger Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Many good suggestions here. I’ll add my .02. Most of which will be reiterations.

    1. Switch out guitars on a regular basis.

    2. Definitely play other instruments. I’ll break out a harmonica, sit at the piano, or plunk on my mountain dulcimer.

    3. Explore alternate tunings. Open C major tuning inspires me. It just has a nice rich sound on any acoustic at least. Anyone can PM me if you want some chords to play, or you might be able to find some on the net.

    4. Try writing a song that is so different from the normal you.

    5. Practice dyads and triads all up and down the neck.

    6. Learn scales that you never played before, such as exotic scales. Ex: Persian scale.

    7. Listen to a sax guy and try to learn his parts on your guitar. Same with trumpet, flute, etc.

    8. Always be on the lookout for a jamming buddy, even if he or she is not as good as you.
     
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  15. ASATKat

    ASATKat Friend of Leo's

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    I love music, I love the hugeness of it, there are more ways to arrange the notes in a typical song than there are bits of sand in the world, add Mars Venus and Mercury to that.

    That blows my mind in a great way. But my main attraction is that I can be endlessly creative, I know I'm just barely scratching the paint, but I don't feel bad because what I can do is one of the greatest gifts I've given myself.

     
  16. fenderchamp

    fenderchamp Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    /me might check out the jazz guitar teqcher. thanks @matrix.

    I have some different ideas about approaches to trying to force progress. I doubt one could do all of them at the same time.

    one thing that probably will help, is seriously learn a couple of solos by somebody you really dig, that's not that far away from the stuff you usually do, but is very much achievable. You'll inevitably cop some new licks.

    Always work on technique for a while every time you practice, and spend your time on what you're bad at, not on what you're good at.

    Another thing, is join a band, and start working it, if your not in one, or join a new one if you're not inspired.

    Another is seriously play 2x (by the clock) as much as you're playing now, you'll find new stuff to do for sure.

    Don't try to radically switch guitar styles, unless you really want to immerse yourself in it. Guitar is difficult and the better you get the more work it is to make great strides, stay in your wheelhouse unless you really mean it. Move in stylistically small steps so as to play to your own stregths.

    Another thing is, don't get high and jam the same scales over the same jammy crap over and over and over with a bunch of effects to cover up sloppy technique.

    Starve yourself of all effects, play clean into a tube amp, it will do wonders for all aspects of your playing, no echo, no distortion, not reverb, none of that crap.

    Another thing is take some lessons from a great teach. You'll know it's a great teacher if they aren't having you work on stuff you already know, and they aren't expecting you to teach yourself, they'll be telling you to do stuff that is different, structured and achievable, and if you do what they say you will make progress. It seems like good teacher s are kind of hard to find.

    Don't listen yo any music at all, and see if more music starts coming out of you instead.

    But mainly, play lots... even if you feel like your doing the same stuff over and over, your getting better every time you play.
     
  17. WingedWords

    WingedWords Tele-Afflicted

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    Not an answer but a great song.
     
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