Country licks on youtube

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by cowboy rob61, Dec 18, 2019.

  1. cowboy rob61

    cowboy rob61 Tele-Meister

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    Looking for recommendations for classic country licks and soloing lessons on YouTube. There's so much stuff, which channels would you recommend ?
     
  2. Bob M

    Bob M Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

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    Doug Seven is pretty good. Good combination of theory and licks.
     
  3. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    biggest riff library is youtube itself

    you can download audio and then use something like this:

    https://www.seventhstring.com/

    don't neglect what bluegrassers can do in first position
     
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  4. brbadg

    brbadg Tele-Afflicted

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  5. cowboy rob61

    cowboy rob61 Tele-Meister

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    Thanks you guys!
     
  6. Junkyard Dog

    Junkyard Dog Tele-Afflicted

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    A lot of these from Ken Carlson are previews of his lessons (I have purchased several from him...they are very good), but there are also complete free lessons there.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/CountryGuitarChops/videos

    Similar deal with TrueFire, but they have many other genres...blues, jazz, rock, etc. Search their channel for country lessons from instructors Jason Loughlin, Bill Kirchen, and Redd Volkaert. I've purchased from them too...extremely high quality.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/TrueFireTV/videos
     
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  7. DeTerminator

    DeTerminator Tele-Meister

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    Rob ( I think), could you tell us what your level of proficiency is at?

    Ken Carlson helped me turn my pickin' toward the cornfield, and then some. I had a pretty solid background when I took up learning from his DVD's. He has an awesome beginning country soloing DVD series that is currently being advertised as having a special holiday price right now. I highly recommend that you take a look at the link that is provided above.

    Good luck, and happy pickin'!
     
  8. DeTerminator

    DeTerminator Tele-Meister

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    Sorry for suggesting DVD's, when OP requested YouTube sources...dohhhh!

    Still, the Country Guitar Chops website has plenty of free videos to learn from.:cool:
     
  9. adamsappel

    adamsappel Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    Another vote for Jim Lill.
     
  10. T Prior

    T Prior Poster Extraordinaire

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    FIRST THINGS FIRST:

    while they are all good and have excellent value,but what many overlook is telling US is the value of playing out of 3 redundant positions as a reference. The beginning, the Primer.

    Knowing these positions in auto pilot is fundamental, you can actually visualize what great players like Doug S is doing before he even speaks a single word. You can see as he floats between chord shapes. No different than watching players such as Feldor, Ford etc... you SEE what shapes they are playing out of immediately. You don't need to be told.

    I' ve talked about this before and will always chime in , especially if we are leaning towards acquiring a B Bender . As a slowly retiring teacher, this is a primary lesson for all students. As a player for multiple decades, I can tell in a NY minute those that know this in basic simplicity and those that don't. Those that DO are soloing out of 2 or 3 positions, regularly. Those that don't are limited and repeating the same licks over and over again, stepping on the OD pedal trying to make it sound different.

    I know this sounds awful but if we are playing in band with players who are stuck in a single position, it becomes " boring city" in a flash. I know this first hand because I ignored my basics for years and payed out of a single position , boring myself to death .I would hit the OD pedal and pretend I was Mike Bloomfield. Clearly, I was not. Same licks every song,played from the exact same positions.



    First things first. Know the fretboard even if its just a small amount.

    I believe Mel Bay calls these Form 1,II and III. I learned all this way back from my first formal teacher in Norwalk Ct, Frank Falcone. I knew this stuff, carried it around for a long time but never put it into practice.


    Form 1-- the stock position we all learn on day 1 and beat it to death for the next 50 years. 5th Fret "A" chord, barred or not , the Chuck Berry position, the position we play Blues out of for the rest of our lives. Add the 7th. Also try NOT barring it and grabbing the 6th string root with your thumb. Oh yeah, if you are soloing Blues starting at the 5th fret A and all of a sudden find yourself up around the 9th and 10th frets , you have just moved to Form III. See how it works ? Its not an accident.


    Form II- Everyone plays here, "A" chord on the 2nd fret. Open A string root or grab it on the 6th string with your pinky. This is the most "used and abused " Country licks position .

    The root changes as we go up the fretboard. Maybe add an open D or even an open E.



    Form III- Perhaps the most valued position for Jazz and Country Music. "D" chord on the 2nd fret, don't forget the 7th. Move this shape up and down the fretboard and add the root, be it OPEN or not. B Bender players, this is perhaps mandatory , the Marty Stuart position. Don't forget, in "D" , the root is the OPEN or on the 5th fret 5th string.

    This is fundamental basics on guitar. The guitar is tuned in 4ths ( except for the pesky 2nd string ) So if we are playing Form 2 at the 2nd fret "A" with the root coming off the 6th string 5 th fret, move everything over 1 string to grab Form III , "D" ( the 4th) on the 2nd fret , the root is now on the 5th fret, 5th string. everyone knows this, right ?


    Going the other direction, Form III to Form II, Now its the ROOT to the 5th. RE: Form III "A" on the 9th fret, coming back across the neck, move to Form II, which is your 'E" chord, (the 5th) . Grab the root at the 12th fret 6th string, or the open. This isn't magic but it sure feels like it.

    Form III and Form II are perhaps the most valued positions along with the open string roots if you can grab them. Mix and match. Move between the positions.


    If we are going to be any sort of Country picker , this stuff is mandatory. Actually any genre of picker. If we are considering a B Bender at some point, this is absolute mandatory.

    5 min a day for 30 days , in 30 days you will be reincarnated !
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2019
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  11. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Joe Dalton
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  12. twangjeff

    twangjeff Tele-Afflicted

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    Keep in mind that most of the country soloing material is not THAT difficult to learn. I would suggest learning songs and learning the record licks. You'll figure out quickly enough the, "How," behind it. On YouTube, you can slow down the videos to 75% or 50% and this really helps to work stuff out.

    Your mileage may vary, but I don't think of playing country in terms of positions and scales, I think of it in terms of chord tones and passing tones. The way that I got to this point is by learning a lot (and I mean a LOT) of the Brent Mason, Dan Huff, Reggie Young, etc. solos and signature licks and realizing that you can mostly break it down into chord tones and blues. '

    Just my opinion, but I think there are a lot of YouTube wizards out there that can play a lot of deedley-deedleys, but couldn't make it through an actual country gig. FWIW, this is where I give Ken Carlson credit. If we all lived in one town, I feel like I could call Ken to sub on a gig and he wouldn't let me down. He seems like someone who actually get's it.
     
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  13. TCB3

    TCB3 TDPRI Member

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    Good points and agreed on Ken Carlson.
     
  14. TCB3

    TCB3 TDPRI Member

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    I've always thought what made country harder to learn in terms of being able to gig in a real country band is that country guitar is based around the song not "idioms" the way the blues/jazz are. So it's not about knowing a "12 bar/8/bar" 1-4-5 in all keys, tempos etc. Same for Jazz. Country has some standards yes and some of the progressions are similar but no basic structure or progression to call out for changes to "jam with" making it harder to play with a stranger or non band member.
     
  15. elmicko

    elmicko Tele-Afflicted

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    I really like the way you’ve laid this out but I need the reference material. Where can I find the information on the forms so I can practice them?
     
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