Could you own a big dog like a Caucasion Shepard?

Skully

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They are just wonderful dogs, but It's really tough to find a good honest breeder, I think the breed is at a bit of a crossroads and breeders really need regulation. Friends in the US have stopped having Leos as they feel the breeders are not acting in the best interests of the breed. :(

We found an excellent breeder here in France, but sadly she moved countries in the few months after we got our first Leo, so when we wanted to get a companion for the first dog we had to look around but couldn't find anyone. In the end a friend found another breeder near than and in good faith bought us a puppy as a present - sadly the 'breeder' really seemed to put profit over the welfare of the dogs. :(

The puppy we had, a male called George was just adorable - but we soon found out that he had hip dysplacia and also malformed elbows on his front legs, which caused constant pain from when he was about 6 months old. We took him to have both conditions operated on as soon as it was recommended, which helped, as did the constant anti-inflamatories, but he was sadly never pain free.

He lived a long and happy life until he was 10, which is a really good age for Leos, but it was clear he was always suffering. In the end we lost him to a twisted stomach. He adored my kids when they were born as was a *total* protector, happy to let them hold on to him as they learned to walk, looked after the other dogs in his pack, and preferred to stay in his kennel outside as he found the house too hot and also the floors too hard for his hips... but he did earn the loving nickname 'Grumpy George' as he had a really charmingly grumpy character! Never nasty, but you could tell his mood from his face, and that he was always in pain.

I've linked a video from 11 years ago of them both playing with our Breton Spaniel when they were about 12 months old, they grew a lot afterwards! You kind of didn't want to put your hand in the way of them playing even then!! I really do miss them both, but you can see that George (laying down) was already much less mobile :(

I think Leos and Newfs have a lot in common!

That's so sad about the hip dysplasia, but it seems he still managed to have a long happy life.

With our first Newf, we were very worried about hip dysplasia. That worry was exacerbated by veterinarians ignorance about the breed. Newfs walk with a hip sway reminiscent of John Wayne and, IIRC, their hip sockets take longer to fully form than other dogs, so an early hip X-ray might mislead a vet into thinking the dog has dysplasia when it doesn't. That's what I remember happening with our first Newf. If grown to be very distrusting of vets.
 
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Skully

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Recent research shows there is as much variation in personality within a breed as there is between breeds. Good training, structure, and adequate exercise are key. It is easier for dogs to behave when they have something positive to do: very hard for them to just do nothing. With regard to health a mutt is generally a better bet due to genetic defects created by too much inbreeding. Cross breeding can help prevent those genetic defects.

It is true that some breeds need a LOT more exercise. Border collies and huskies can run over twenty miles a day and be raring to go for more. A short walk around the block ain’t gonna cut it. Fetching a Frisbee or ball for half an hour twice a day would probably suffice, though. For a border collie actually herding sheep or agility competitions would be optimal.

Once well exercised, dogs are happy to sleep about 16 hours a day…
There may be variation in personality within breeds, but, in my experience, their core shared characteristics are overwhelmingly more significant. I've experienced this with my Newfoundlands. Even when I'm watching Newfs I've never met on video, their very Newf-y traits are very apparent to me. After my wife adopted a Siberian Husky off the street, I learned all its traits that were making my life miserable were hallmarks of the breed.

We've taken in some rescues in recent years, and that's mostly worked out. But it's also convinced me that the breed I prefer is the Newf, and it's really all I want to have going forward.
 
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buster poser

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Recent research shows there is as much variation in personality within a breed as there is between breeds.
The article I saw shared at work buried an important and kind of contradictory point below its "Massive study of pet dogs shows breed does not predict behaviour" headline.


The team found that some traits were more common in certain breeds. For example, compared with a random dog, German shepherds were more easily directed; beagles, not so much. And the authors’ genetic studies revealed that mixed-breed dogs with a particular ancestry were more likely to act in specific ways. Mutts with St Bernard ancestry, for instance, were more affectionate, whereas mutts descended from Chesapeake Bay retrievers had a penchant for wrecking doors.

Like uh... exactly? And that last citation is fairly specific as just one example. Other specific behaviors accompany things like a dog being bred for murdering small animals independent of their nominal masters. Breed influences behavior to an amazing degree. Variations within sure, but most Danes are mellow. Most Beagles bay. Most Belgians are kind of twitchy and focused.
 

chris m.

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The article I saw shared at work buried an important and kind of contradictory point below its "Massive study of pet dogs shows breed does not predict behaviour" headline.


The team found that some traits were more common in certain breeds. For example, compared with a random dog, German shepherds were more easily directed; beagles, not so much. And the authors’ genetic studies revealed that mixed-breed dogs with a particular ancestry were more likely to act in specific ways. Mutts with St Bernard ancestry, for instance, were more affectionate, whereas mutts descended from Chesapeake Bay retrievers had a penchant for wrecking doors.

Like uh... exactly? And that last citation is fairly specific as just one example. Other specific behaviors accompany things like a dog being bred for murdering small animals independent of their nominal masters. Breed influences behavior to an amazing degree. Variations within sure, but most Danes are mellow. Most Beagles bay. Most Belgians are kind of twitchy and focused.
I don't see a conflict. You do a multivariate correlation and find that breed does have an effect, but also individual personalities of dogs has an equally powerful effect. Both can be true at the same time.

That's one reason why there are lots of guides on how to select a puppy from a litter, or a puppy or older dog from a shelter. Simple tests you can do to test for friendliness, anxiety, serenity, curiosity, aggressiveness, confidence, intelligence etc.
 

bgmacaw

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That's one reason why there are lots of guides on how to select a puppy from a litter, or a puppy or older dog from a shelter. Simple tests you can do to test for friendliness, anxiety, serenity, curiosity, aggressiveness, confidence, intelligence etc.

I learned a lot of this from my grandfather who was a veterinarian and, along with his brothers, had a literal dog and pony show in the 1910's and 1920's. The only problem is that it can be difficult to be objective sometimes, especially if a dog is particularly cute or you feel sorry for it, as was the case with the Norfolk Terrier I mentioned earlier in this thread.
 

buster poser

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I don't see a conflict. You do a multivariate correlation and find that breed does have an effect, but also individual personalities of dogs has an equally powerful effect. Both can be true at the same time.

That's one reason why there are lots of guides on how to select a puppy from a litter, or a puppy or older dog from a shelter. Simple tests you can do to test for friendliness, anxiety, serenity, curiosity, aggressiveness, confidence, intelligence etc.
Yeah I don't disagree at all, sorry there. I guess I just mean there are certain broadstrokes you can reliably figure on with many/most breeds and thinking certain traits can be muted/burned out because they're all "individuals" usually leads to resetting of expectations. In my experience you're very unlikely to encounter a hair-trigger Mastiff or conversely, a very mellow Jack Russell; that's all I meant.
 

Tele-beeb

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I love the Caucasion Shepard, but no way could I come close to providing what it needs. Or maybe a Kangal, less work than a CS but still a giant dog. Take it down a notch to a Rottweiler or?

Could you own one?

Caucasian Shepard
]https://images.app.goo.gl/GPMsj4baHNqDKh3S7[/URL]
I like big dogs… my Babydog is 90 lbs and I worry her hips/frame will fail her.
I give her meat every day both meals (or eggs.) Also cartilage when I can. It seems an optimum sized dog is 25-45 lbs?
I will help my big dog as best I know how.
 

haggardfan1

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Wow, that's a lot of canine, and very beautiful.

I'm glad so many have a fondness for giant breeds. (Read up on Burt Ward, who played Robin in the old Batman series. "GentleGiants.com").

I've never been owned by a giant dog; my 80-pound black Lab is my largest ever.

I've known some people who had Great Danes and they were wonderful.
 

Dbrian66

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Those Shepherds are great looking dogs. I’ve never met one, but his size would not deter me from adopting one.

My favorite breed is the Rottweiller. I’ve had them in my house for the last twenty some years. They are big gentle animals. And there are plenty of them out there in need of a good home. This is my current guy. He only weighs in at just over 100lbs, but he thinks he is a 20lb lap dog. He and my son are almost inseparable!

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B4ACB4FA-1BC1-4909-9675-6C780E70B478.jpeg
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haggardfan1

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The owner of the adjacent business to my previous workplace had an Italian Mastiff. Is that also a Cane Corso? I can't recall.

In any event, he was massive and incredibly sweet, calm, and well behaved. He weighed about 175 pounds and was as gentle as a lamb. His person used to bring him over to our pharmacy and let everyone pet him; it was akin to having a pony in the store.

It's hard to imagine transporting a dog that size in a vehicle, but their hoomans somehow manage.
 

buster poser

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The owner of the adjacent business to my previous workplace had an Italian Mastiff. Is that also a Cane Corso? I can't recall.

In any event, he was massive and incredibly sweet, calm, and well behaved. He weighed about 175 pounds and was as gentle as a lamb. His person used to bring him over to our pharmacy and let everyone pet him; it was akin to having a pony in the store.

It's hard to imagine transporting a dog that size in a vehicle, but their hoomans somehow manage.
Yup, same same with the Cane Corso. That's incredibly heavy for one however. Usually top around around 120 or so iirc.

Our 100 pounder rides in the little i3 and loves it, though it's fun watching her take one leap and get up into the rear seat of the 4x4.
 

GeneB

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While I was born in NYC my wife was born and raised in Tokyo. Which means we were bi-continental prior to the Great Disturbance and flew from TIA to Narita annually. Our dog Merlot is a Corgi and would make the trip without any issues. I don't know if they have crates large enough to accommodate larger breeds but traveling with a horse-sized dog can't be fun.
 

PCollen

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I love the Caucasion Shepard, but no way could I come close to providing what it needs. Or maybe a Kangal, less work than a CS but still a giant dog. Take it down a notch to a Rottweiler or?

Could you own one?

Caucasian Shepard
]https://images.app.goo.gl/GPMsj4baHNqDKh3S7[/URL]
No...the bed is not large enough for the two of us as is with a cat, a chihuahua, and a CoJack.
 

Dbrian66

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That's incredibly heavy for one however. Usually top around around 120 or so iirc.

I find people seem to exaggerate a dog’s weight. Like when people talk about how big the fish they caught was! 😂

I have had people tell me about their 150lb Rottweillers before. I can’t say they are lying because I don’t carry a scale around with me, but I had a huge Rottie and she only weighed in at about 120. Idk, I just roll with it when people say stuff like that. Who knows, maybe they’re right?
 

Mike Eskimo

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In six pages this probably was answered but I’m not gonna go back and read but, were Caucasian shepherds bred to herd white people? 🤔

Neighbors across the street from us for about four years had two enormous great Danes. They were both kind of jumpy but they were also very sweet dogs and they’d come and bump up against you like they were big horses, which they were.

But just them running around in the backyard like an average dog kept their sizable yard looking like a corral. Just loose dirt and a couple tufts of grass.
 

boris bubbanov

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I was just thinking about how Domino has gotten up to 48 pounds and now doesn't fit in the footwell of either the Miata or the S-2000. So, he's at home right now, not out doing things with us today. Which kinda defeats half the reason for having a pup.

With the price of dog food having doubled (I would say) this would be no small investment.
 




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