Could you own a big dog like a Caucasion Shepard?

maxvintage

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Unless I lived in a really rural area i would not own a dog again. They just aren't suited for urban life. i know millions of people disagree with this, but for me, no.

A small yappy dog that barks incessantly would also be intolerable. My in laws have one like that and they love it but I'm always relieved to get out of earshot. So if I lived on a farm I would own a big dog, yes. Otherwise, no
 

Skully

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Yup, depends highly on the "job." Our Bullmastiff is territorial but mellow in the home; she springs into action if we seem alarmed as you'd expect from a "game warden's" dog but isn't constantly on alert. Labs and gun dogs are similar... they look to their humans for guidance in the field, and work "with" them. In the home... the breeds don't have poachers to bring down or ducks to retrieve and seem able to switch off. 'Barker & Marker' type livestock dogs (Pyrenees) tend to make good pets because the companion behaviors were prioritized for bringing the dog in at night. Lots of other workers like this, Newfs, Bernies.

Many terriers, hounds, and shepherds otoh are less apt to 'relax' in the home in my experience. That's what makes them awesome as workers, but the independence = they don't need you to do their work, and they will keep looking for that work a large part of the time. Everyone knows the shepherd that herds children or other dogs, or like our Jack Russell who was on a hair trigger for small animals constantly.

We had a golden retriever was practically a prisoner of his breeding. I would throw a rope up on my kids' play apparatus, and the golden would climb the ladder in back, retrieve the rope and come down the slide in front. He would do this 20-30+ times in a row if you kept throwing the rope. I stopped doing it when he got older, because I worried about its effect on his aging joints.
 
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Lone_Poor_Boy

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Why are people afraid of big poops? They're no big deal.

"Afraid"? What an odd, negative slant to put on it.

Let me ask then; Why are so many men 'afraid' of having a small dog?

To respond to the original question;
-It's a choice, just like yours is a choice.
-I love Jack Russell's. They aren't inbred like the vast majority of breeds over time, so they typically don't have the health issues you see in others, and live longer lives on average. Although the same can be said for mutts, as long as they aren't part of one of the notorious early health issue dogs, like Labs.
-AKC allows inbreeding and, in my opinion, promotes inbreeding via the outcomes they are looking for in dogs. Jack Russell's are not part of the AKC and the JRTCA does not allow it.
-More on Jack's: Smart as hell and they will fight a dog 4x their size to defend you or your kids. And they often win. Been there.
-They need exercise/play. I didn't get the dog to be a throw pillow, and it's good for the body and soul.
-Smaller body, shorter hair(usually) = less hair everywhere. It matters, when you've lived the difference and like to keep your house clean.
-Small enough even my 5' 4" partner could easily carry our girl around, up and down stairs and outside, when it became difficult for her to get around as she made it to 17 yrs 8 months. Same with the one that passed in 2011.

Of all the dogs I've lived with since the first one when I was just 6 or so, these two Jack Russell's we had over the span of 1998-2022 have been the healthiest, smartest, easiest to care for ('cept for playin') of them all.
 

Skully

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"Afraid"? What an odd, negative slant to put on it.

Let me ask then; Why are so many men 'afraid' of having a small dog?

To respond to the original question;
-It's a choice, just like yours is a choice.
-I love Jack Russell's. They aren't inbred like the vast majority of breeds over time, so they typically don't have the health issues you see in others, and live longer lives on average. Although the same can be said for mutts, as long as they aren't part of one of the notorious early health issue dogs, like Labs.
-AKC allows inbreeding and, in my opinion, promotes inbreeding via the outcomes they are looking for in dogs. Jack Russell's are not part of the AKC and the JRTCA does not allow it.
-More on Jack's: Smart as hell and they will fight a dog 4x their size to defend you or your kids. And they often win. Been there.
-They need exercise/play. I didn't get the dog to be a throw pillow, and it's good for the body and soul.
-Smaller body, shorter hair(usually) = less hair everywhere. It matters, when you've lived the difference and like to keep your house clean.
-Small enough even my 5' 4" partner could easily carry our girl around, up and down stairs and outside, when it became difficult for her to get around as she made it to 17 yrs 8 months. Same with the one that passed in 2011.

Of all the dogs I've lived with since the first one when I was just 6 or so, these two Jack Russell's we had over the span of 1998-2022 have been the healthiest, smartest, easiest to care for ('cept for playin') of them all.

So what you're saying is you're absolutely terrified of big poops.
 

gitold

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I have to have a small dog so I can afford to feed him or her quality food. The 50lb bags of burnt kibble ain’t cuttin it for my pup.
 

getbent

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tdog.jpg


70lbs is nothing like the big shepherds... but, he is fast!
 

Alex_C

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I love the Caucasion Shepard, but no way could I come close to providing what it needs. Or maybe a Kangal, less work than a CS but still a giant dog. Take it down a notch to a Rottweiler or?

Could you own one?

Caucasian Shepard
]https://images.app.goo.gl/GPMsj4baHNqDKh3S7[/URL]
We have GEORGE, he is a Great Dane and Mastif mix. 160+ lbs in is prime. He's getting old, 8+ (rescue, so no firm data). Currently around 130lbs. We also have 4 other dogs and two cats. A Caucasian Shepard isn't too big to give a home to.
 

marc2211

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We were seriously exploring Leonbergers before we became Newf people, but it was hard to find a breeder at that time.

They are just wonderful dogs, but It's really tough to find a good honest breeder, I think the breed is at a bit of a crossroads and breeders really need regulation. Friends in the US have stopped having Leos as they feel the breeders are not acting in the best interests of the breed. :(

We found an excellent breeder here in France, but sadly she moved countries in the few months after we got our first Leo, so when we wanted to get a companion for the first dog we had to look around but couldn't find anyone. In the end a friend found another breeder near than and in good faith bought us a puppy as a present - sadly the 'breeder' really seemed to put profit over the welfare of the dogs. :(

The puppy we had, a male called George was just adorable - but we soon found out that he had hip dysplacia and also malformed elbows on his front legs, which caused constant pain from when he was about 6 months old. We took him to have both conditions operated on as soon as it was recommended, which helped, as did the constant anti-inflamatories, but he was sadly never pain free.

He lived a long and happy life until he was 10, which is a really good age for Leos, but it was clear he was always suffering. In the end we lost him to a twisted stomach. He adored my kids when they were born as was a *total* protector, happy to let them hold on to him as they learned to walk, looked after the other dogs in his pack, and preferred to stay in his kennel outside as he found the house too hot and also the floors too hard for his hips... but he did earn the loving nickname 'Grumpy George' as he had a really charmingly grumpy character! Never nasty, but you could tell his mood from his face, and that he was always in pain.

I've linked a video from 11 years ago of them both playing with our Breton Spaniel when they were about 12 months old, they grew a lot afterwards! You kind of didn't want to put your hand in the way of them playing even then!! I really do miss them both, but you can see that George (laying down) was already much less mobile :(
 
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teletimetx

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There are more than enough breeds and mutts to go around. Even though we like to think breeding creates standardized behavior, many dogs have enough personality to be more than expected.

I like ‘em all. For me, though, some breeds are like boats - really great for someone else to take care of.
 

Timbresmith1

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If I had the yard space, I’d have a pair of large dogs, but rescued mutts or mixed breed. Even adopted older dogs that needed re-homing.
 

bgmacaw

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Miss you little fella, but I will never have another terrier of any kind.

A few years ago we had a Norfolk Terrier, a rescue. The rescue organization didn't tell us that he had been abused by the former owner before being surrendered to a vet in lieu of legal action. The poor dog had a broken hip from the abuse that didn't heal right and he had several behavioral issues. Unfortunately, he bit our landlord at the time, a really nasty and aggressive woman who was bullying my wife at that moment, so we lost him that way. He was returned to the rescue and they found him an owner who specialized in handling cases like his.
 

Festofish

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Where’s that English teacher? Most people could but the question is would they?
Me
Could? Sure.
Would? Hell no. I live in a single wide in a park. A big dog would be as irresponsible as driving a truck or suv with just you in the cab.
 

chris m.

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Recent research shows there is as much variation in personality within a breed as there is between breeds. Good training, structure, and adequate exercise are key. It is easier for dogs to behave when they have something positive to do: very hard for them to just do nothing. With regard to health a mutt is generally a better bet due to genetic defects created by too much inbreeding. Cross breeding can help prevent those genetic defects.

It is true that some breeds need a LOT more exercise. Border collies and huskies can run over twenty miles a day and be raring to go for more. A short walk around the block ain’t gonna cut it. Fetching a Frisbee or ball for half an hour twice a day would probably suffice, though. For a border collie actually herding sheep or agility competitions would be optimal.

Once well exercised, dogs are happy to sleep about 16 hours a day…
 

ASATKat

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We have GEORGE, he is a Great Dane and Mastif mix. 160+ lbs in is prime. He's getting old, 8+ (rescue, so no firm data). Currently around 130lbs. We also have 4 other dogs and two cats. A Caucasian Shepard isn't too big to give a home to.
Lol
 

Fiesta Red

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The biggest dog I’ve ever had is my daughter’s Dogo Argentino, Hank (fortunately, he has not ripped off/out the faces, limbs or throats of anyone yet, in spite of some warnings from a member of this forum). He weighs between 110-120 pounds (he’s lost a little recently, due to a renewed exercise program for myself, my wife and both the dogs).

Hank’s more than big enough.

As much as I love Hank, I prefer small dogs—thus the presence of our 7-pound Silky Terrier, Willie (who has not ripped off/out any limbs, faces or throats, either—in spite of his best efforts).
 

ASATKat

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We have GEORGE, he is a Great Dane and Mastif mix. 160+ lbs in is prime. He's getting old, 8+ (rescue, so no firm data). Currently around 130lbs. We also have 4 other dogs and two cats. A Caucasian Shepard isn't too big to give a home to.
It's bigger and stronger than any of your other pets. A CS would own or destroy your great dane.
 




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