Cosmetic 'surgery'

Discussion in 'Other T-Types and Partscasters' started by seeyou, Jan 22, 2020.

  1. seeyou

    seeyou TDPRI Member Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    34
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2019
    Location:
    Singapore
    Hi all!
    Bit of a long read but done for absolute fun.

    Some of you'll recall I recently acquired a Fender MIJ 2018 Limited Collection Tele based on a '60s type as my shown avatar. Lovely guitar, really a brilliant buy and great specs overall (it is an equivalent of an AVRI/AO). I'd assume a perfect Tele for me despite many years late into the Tele game, however there are two issues with me.

    I love to tinker and secondly i'd like an opportunity to preserve this Tele and its original parts so why not! Yes it gets played but i'm no fan of relics, and hate it when I ding of my guitars.

    Hardware: the original parts are all US spec'd and lets be honest, apart from the vintage theme they were never made "perfect" due to Leo's legendary stinginess eg the ashtray bridges with jagged edges. I get "it's part of the charm" but it's now 2020 and life is supposed to be better.
    So out with the 'old' bridge and on with a new Gotoh In-tune with lowered sides plus Titanium & Brass saddles. The new bridge just feels like it was designed for Teles so it is a great improvement. No more sharp edges in the wrong places. The jury is out if Ti or Brass are hugely different to my cloth ears (it is really subtle) but they feel much better than the original barrel-grooved saddles, and if i'm really fussy the intonation is better. I'm a generation too young to understand the grooved saddles concept so do enlighten me please! Are you supposed to move the strings between the grooves? :)

    I also kept knocking the top hat off during pickup switching and realised the charm having a switch close to the Volume knob is 'as designed'. Doesn't anyone get pissed off with this?
    I'd read various hacks using super-glue for the selector tip but luckily a few smart folks out there realise this and could sell me a better designed control plate...thank you Marc Rutter! Nice selector tip too!
    You'll see different knobs which probably saved about 50 grams on the overall weight hahaha.

    Whilst I was at it, the original vintage tuners look great, do their work. But a) i'm a dunce with the old style tuning posts (i'm too old to learn the zig-zag locking thing and extra winding on certain posts) and b) it could look "better"! So on with a set of Gotoh 510's with pearloid buttons. These work as expected and no chance of neck dip with the light-weight buttons. Not that there was any neck dip! Funnily, I didn't realise the way to remove the original tuner bushings was to wiggle them in a circular motion with a screwdriver shaft so I learnt something in this process! Yes I was worried i'd break the wood or something daft like that. Neck plate was swapped out with one from Decoboom. The original looks too nice to duff up.

    Wiring: my main guitar is a Brian May model and let's be honest, that guy is an effin' genius. That's been my main guitar for the past 15 years and i've got used to having switching options. So why not have out-of-phase, in series but how to wire this with a 3-way switch and 2 push-pulls pots? Loads of diagrams on the web with 4-way selectors and with either OOP or series however I eventually found a diagram which I had no idea if it would work. Can't recall where I got it exactly but it didn't look difficult to wire up. That's until I received the push-pull pots and saw how small the area was on the dpdt contact points. I've only rewired my BM guitar using normal on-off switches in the past and those have loads of space in comparison to these pots. Did as neat a job I could and had to hope two particular difficult joints with multiple wires worked on the phase reverse...that really was a "just get on" moment! Oh I didn't swap out the original CS Twisted Tele pickups as they sound great on their own and fortunately my wiring worked fine! Thank you to who ever posted the diagram on the web.

    I still have a new electrosocket to screw in but haven't worked out how to get the existing one off as i'm short of some tools in my apartment. Not a biggie and just hope the original falls out! Any quick ways to get it to drop out?

    Lastly the original pickguard is a nice mint-white so that had to be kept pristine and was removed. Though tempted to leave it 'naked' I paid some doh for a flash looking pickguard from Decoboom. My wife picked it so justified its purchase! And there you have it. Some may say i've semi-butchered this but the end result is still a nice-to-play and sounding Tele. I've finally discovered these are made to be tinkered with!

    Hmm thinking about it, would this look better with a roasted quarter sawn, all-maple, fat profile neck? What about another body made out of swamp ash or pine......
     
  2. seeyou

    seeyou TDPRI Member Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    34
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2019
    Location:
    Singapore
    Some photos too!
     

    Attached Files:

    • 1.jpg
      1.jpg
      File size:
      169.6 KB
      Views:
      22
    • 2.jpg
      2.jpg
      File size:
      150.7 KB
      Views:
      22
    • 3.jpg
      3.jpg
      File size:
      215.4 KB
      Views:
      22
    • 4.jpg
      4.jpg
      File size:
      181.2 KB
      Views:
      22
    • 5.jpg
      5.jpg
      File size:
      160.4 KB
      Views:
      23
    • 6.jpg
      6.jpg
      File size:
      148.4 KB
      Views:
      22
    • 7.jpg
      7.jpg
      File size:
      168.3 KB
      Views:
      23
    • 8.jpg
      8.jpg
      File size:
      101.8 KB
      Views:
      23
    • 9.jpg
      9.jpg
      File size:
      182.3 KB
      Views:
      21
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.