Corian for nut material ?

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by SpareRibs, Feb 20, 2013.

  1. SpareRibs

    SpareRibs Tele-Meister

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    Hello,
    Is there a tutorial on making a nut? I have acquired some Corian so
    I want to start making them. I know it may take a while but everyone started
    somewhere.
     
  2. Peter Rabbit

    Peter Rabbit Tele-Holic

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  3. Rob DiStefano

    Rob DiStefano Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    highly compressed plastic, corian makes for a really good nut and i'll use it when a special dimensioned nut is required for s special neck.

    love those home depot corian samples :D

    but i stil prefer unbleached bone. :cool:
     
  4. dadder

    dadder Tele-Meister

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    I find corian a good, all round and consistent material. It is available in white and "bone" color. Haven't yet found any black that doesn't have a fleck in it tho'.
    Of course, there are some who don't like it (aren't there always?) so, I use real bone which I process myself and even brass (if the customer insists). I have also used snakewood on violins and banjos.
     
  5. Rob DiStefano

    Rob DiStefano Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    corian (the kitchen counter material ;) ) comes in every shade/hue of color one can imagine, from black hole ebony to brilliant sun white. i keep samples of black, white, ivory and amber on hand. i've also used lipstick red, gold flake white and emerald green for "special" customers. :D
     
  6. Codger

    Codger Tele-Meister

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    I've made a lot of Clorian nuts. It's a great nut material. I tried it for an acoustic saddle once and it cracked it time, so I won't do that again. It doesn't have the tensile strength for a saddle, but that doesn't matter for nuts. It has great qualities for nuts, and it smells a hell of a lot better going through the table saw than bone does!
     
  7. castpolymer

    castpolymer Poster Extraordinaire

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    Dupont Corian consists of approx. 45% acrylic plastic and 55% alumina tri hydrate. It is gravity cast on a continuos cast line in lots of approx. 150 sheets ( 30" x 144" x 1/2" ). A hardening catalyst is introduced into the mix pre - cast. Once cast, it moves on to a curing tunnel for an undisclosed period of time to insure that the product has the maximum amount of hardness prior to sanding. The sheets are then cut to lenght and move to a number of double headed sanding machines that will take it down the final thickness of 1/2". If the product is not at the right barcol / rockwell hardness, it will gum up the sanding belts on the machines and drop the entire line. Corian has been on the market since the late 60's. It was originally sold thru lumber yards at 3/4" thickness and was available in 3 solid colors. I have actually refinished counter tops that were installed in the early 70's here in OKC and once re - sanded, look as good as the day they were installed. It is also a non - porous product ( it can stain, but will not promote any bacterial growth ) and is specified in nearly all food service applications in the U.S., Europe and the Far East. Corian is also a Class One fire code product. It will not burn and will actually help to snuff out a fire due to the ATH releasing water when it is super heated. Corian can also be thermoformed ( heated and bent ) using an oven that will accomodate the material's size.

    I used to run a company that fabricated Corian ( and other solid surface products ).
     
  8. castpolymer

    castpolymer Poster Extraordinaire

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    I always thought Corian smelled a bit like lacquer when it is being cut.
     
  9. Codger

    Codger Tele-Meister

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    True but the smell of bone going through a table saw will make you toss your cookies.
     
  10. BartS

    BartS Friend of Leo's

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    I've watched a lot of good nut making tutorials on youtube. Get on there and look it up I learned a lot that way.
     
  11. castpolymer

    castpolymer Poster Extraordinaire

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    I would not doubt it a bit. I actually like the smell of Corian thru a table saw. Smelled like money to me. ;)
     
  12. SpareRibs

    SpareRibs Tele-Meister

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    Corian

    Hello,
    What tool do you use to cut them to the size of nut blanks?
     
  13. Rob DiStefano

    Rob DiStefano Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    table saw or band saw to cut proud width dimensions (1/8"+ and 3/16"+ and 1/4"+), then a drill press robo sander (stew mac) to bring all the widths down to required spex.
     
  14. Codger

    Codger Tele-Meister

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    After table saw and band saw, I use a file and sand paper. When it's done it polishes up nicely with toothpaste.
     
  15. Ed Miller

    Ed Miller Tele-Meister

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    Corian is an excellent nut material. I also use it for heel caps, and corner blocks on F style mandolins and Florentine (Sharp) cutaways.
     
  16. SpareRibs

    SpareRibs Tele-Meister

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    Corian

    Hello, Thank all of you for the information. I really appreciate the fact that this site helps when trying something new. Without the tutorial on this site and all of the people who responded, I would have been stumbling around in the dark as far as squaring up the blank and placing the slots. The nut looks very simple until you start thinking about it then it starts to get more complicated.
    I think I am ready to take it on. When I get acceptable results I will
    post them. Thank you once again!
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2013
  17. Soapbarstrat

    Soapbarstrat Tele-Meister

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    I make them the hard way (I always assume there's an easier way). I draw a line where I want to cut, clamp the corian in a vise and cut along the line with a mini-hacksaw. I've got one flat side and a rough side. I clamp it rough side up in my crude little router planer thing. I used to use double stick tape to hold the corian down, but then I got good at holding it down nice and tight with thin scrap strips of metal and plastic on both sides of the corian. One scrap piece flexible, so it pinches the corian at both ends. Mill it down so it's a couple thou thicker than the final size (using calipers to check it), which will happen with some strokes over a flat sanding block.
    Some blanks.
    Final result.
     
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