Cool snare technique

Discussion in 'Recording In Progress' started by woodman, Aug 14, 2019.

  1. woodman

    woodman Grand Wazoo @ The Woodshed Gold Supporter

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    Last week on another thread, I commented that specific production styles don't prohibit learning techniques from producers who aren't within your genre.

    Here's a perfect example. Along with Recording Revolution (which recently featured a course with Jacquire King), I also subscribe to Jordan Valeriotte's blog, Hardcore Music Studio ... he focuses on metal and other heavy forms. But this trick for making the snare pop using a mono room mix was pretty impressive. It works on virtual drums like EZD, even though his example was from miked-up drums.

    This helped solved a lingering problem of mine, getting some beef on the snare in a dense mix. Maybe it'll work for you too.

     
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  2. GuitarPix

    GuitarPix Tele-Meister

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    Cool - thanks for sharing that


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  3. SolidSteak

    SolidSteak Friend of Leo's

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    That's pretty cool, using a mono room mix to make EQ adjustments. His mix already sounded very good to my amateur ears, especially in the kick drum when he cut the lows and highs on the stereo mix in the beginning (which I guess is pretty standard to do?) After that I couldn't really keep straight what was affecting what, especially when he brought in compression and gates, but at the end the snare definitely sounds more present in the mix.

    Very useful, thanks!
     
  4. studio

    studio Poster Extraordinaire

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    Um, my wife says I have no problem sounding dense!
     
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  5. suthol

    suthol Friend of Leo's

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    I'm hearing ya
     
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  6. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Interesting, I've never been much good with recording and mixing tech, but I should learn more.

    I have focused on getting some beef on the snare sound though, and once I learned to play drums I noticed drums in mixes more.
    The classic Ludwig 5x14 chrome snare sounds is on so many old recordings and I cannot stand that sound!
    So I bought lots of snares and found I love a 10x14 maple snare with cast hoops for the huge fat crack it makes.
     
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  7. studio

    studio Poster Extraordinaire

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    Watched the video, very good with the CLA 75.

    No doubt the real test is how the snare and the floor toms fill came together.

    I do something similar with multiband compressor and EQ.

    I like the process with the room mics. Thanks Woody!
     
  8. studio

    studio Poster Extraordinaire

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    I bought a snare for my buddy Jeff. He had that painful metal ring to his sound.
    Once he got the maple snare to his liking, it changed his entire sound and confidence level!
     
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  9. jimash

    jimash Friend of Leo's

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    My drummer friend just recently put new heads on his ludwig snare that has been living in my playroom.
    Unfortunately I think the new heads pushed my tinnitus into a new uncomfortable territory, even though i forbade him to hit it unless I had the headphones on.

    anyhow, I do use all those tools, and sometimes I like to capture it raw before all the dicking about. To that end, I will put up one Condenser ( works well with the Oktava mk319) just basically out in front of the drums at head height, ( in addition to the regular mics)and compress the heck out of that with a DBX163x through my console. There it is.
     
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  10. beyer160

    beyer160 Friend of Leo's

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    Room mics are a great tool for making drums sound more "natural" or "organic". Once you start compressing them, you get into "rawness" and "aggression".

    Another cool trick for getting more meat out of your snare is to mic the shell in addition to the standard top mic.
     
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  11. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    That was a great example and gives this greenhorn some much needed help with the drum tracks. Thank you so much for posting.
     
  12. Ben Harmless

    Ben Harmless Friend of Leo's

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    This is a great tutorial, and he puts - and keeps - everything in context really effectively. At about 4:30 he says something critical: "any drumkit I'm mixing, I'm trying to find something unique - some cool part of it, whether it's a room mike, or just a raw close mic - something unique that I can emphasize." That's always been my method - find a piece of the character of the track(s) that can serve as an anchor, and then have everything kind of dance around that. Sometimes that's something in the high end and something else in the lows.

    Woodman's right - this stuff is great to making virtual drums sound more real - I still use the original EZDrummer, and I break it out into eight tracks, but wind up mixing mostly around the room and overhead tracks. They provide for great parallel compression. The close mics tend to be just for clarity and emphasis when needed.

    I wish I got to play with real drums as much as I used to...
     
  13. johnny k

    johnny k Friend of Leo's

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    What are you listening to in those headphones ?
    I don t think anyone managed to prohibit anything to a drummer.:D
     
  14. jimash

    jimash Friend of Leo's

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    Well of course I am listening to the drums in the headphones, but they aren't as loud as that snare is , in the open.yeah, I know, but we've been around the block and though he laughs it off, he knows I am serious.
     
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  15. woodman

    woodman Grand Wazoo @ The Woodshed Gold Supporter

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    ^^^Now that right there is some deep food for thought .... :cool:
     
  16. jimash

    jimash Friend of Leo's

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    It is very satisfying to record real drums. My buddy Matt's Blue spoarkle ludwigs and Vintage Zildians are fine. But I also use samples like "DrumCore" That I bought years ago, and some other collections.
    Recently I've gotten pretty good results working the drums up against a rhythm guitar in Garageband before exporting that into proTools. There's a thing in there that seems like plain samples, but you can raelly do some editing of the balance and instrumentation of the sample, once you load them..
     
  17. Geoff738

    Geoff738 Poster Extraordinaire

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    The thing about basing your drum sound around the overs and/or rooms is that you need a decent room. But it can be great way to go if you’ve got a good room kit and drummer.

    Glyn Johns/Recorderman is basically overs with the kick added in as a spot mic.

    Recording the shell of the snare is also a great little technique. A Beyer 201 works well there IME, but a 57 is probably fine. I didn’t have a mic on the top. The phase issues would give me pause, but who knows.

    Sometimes these videos make me think I want to record a full kit again. Usually I come to my senses before long.

    Cheers,
    Geoff
     
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