Consistent Truss Rod Relief For Different Tunings?

thoumardguitar4

NEW MEMBER!
Joined
Aug 25, 2022
Posts
1
Age
30
Location
North Carolina
I'm a broke college student, so I'm posting this to a large audience that has more guitars and experience than I do. I have a 2018 Squier CV Tele as my only electric guitar. Besides standard tuning, at it's lowest, I will go a whole step down for some tunings, but will also play slide in Open G, D and up to E, all with 10-46 strings. I like my truss rod relief at .010", measured by a capo at the first fret and fretting the last fret, measuring the distance from the top of the 8th fret to the bottom of the low E string. When I tune down a whole step down, my relief goes to about .008", when I tune up to open E, the relief goes to about .012". It was driving me bonkers how tunings with higher string tension, my action got higher, making it even harder to play, and the lower tension and easier to play tunings, my action got lower and would rattle frets. So I tried this with my Seagull Maritime acoustic (my only acoustic guitar), and that truss rod stayed solid at .010" for all tunings with 12-53 strings. So my question, is this a common trait with cheaper made electrics? Is it due to just the truss rod? Is about neck size? Is it just overall build quality? Do your electrics truss rod stay locked in with these different tunings? In a perfect world, it would be nice for the Squier to have the truss stay as consistent as the Seagull. Thank you!
 

tomasz

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Dec 18, 2007
Posts
1,210
Location
Europe
I think the only way to expect a guitar neck to move less, would be a chunkier quartersawn neck. Those usually stay pretty stable - still some movement will happen I would not expect a squier neck to be that stable.
 

blue metalflake

Doctor of Teleocity
Ad Free Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2005
Posts
17,458
Age
69
Location
ireland
I’m surprised that dropping a whole step gives you 2 thou difference. I always found Tele necks to be quite stable.
 

Toto'sDad

Tele Axpert
Ad Free Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2011
Posts
59,668
Location
Bakersfield
Man, my Tele gets a neck ache when I tune it.

Doctor, why are you tuning it, it wasn't tuned when you got it?
 

warrent

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Sep 15, 2009
Posts
4,424
Location
toronto
Just adjust the truss rod when you change tunings, that's why it's adjustable.
 

fenderchamp

Friend of Leo's
Ad Free Member
Joined
Jun 17, 2008
Posts
3,371
Location
omaha
Squires tend to have skinny little necks, which is why I kind of avoid them. Obviously it's easy enough to understand that a 2x4 is going move a lot less under tension than a yardstick, so there's that. If you tied a metal rod to either one and the stability issue might be mitigated to some degree between the two pieces of wood, but not entirely.

I think the wood is where the basic stability or lack of it is going to come from. The truss rod is just exerting additional backbow. I would guess, and I might be completely off base, but I would guess that if you have the truss rod, tighter and the wood is more compressed that the neck might be more stable. If you, with your 10's on, in standard tuning, loosen it up all the way, where does your relief end up? And or conversly, if you without changing anything string it up with 9's or 11's where does your relief end up when you tune in the various tunings.

Also is the change in relief bothering you when you play, or is it just bothering you when you measure it.
I can see why it would be frustrating as probably want less relief when you are playing in standard tuning and playing lead, and if you have more relief and more tension the slide is going to feel better, and what you have going on is just the opposite. Also because slide guitar is so lick based you can't very well just tune it one way and capo it to where you want. Open D and open G licks are not the same licks.

I would be interested to see what happens when you get heavier strings and more tension on the trussrod and see if things get more stable or less stable.

If it was me, I would start by experimenting with heavier string gauges and more tension on the trussrod and seeing if that helps.
 




Top