1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

Considering a Tele bridge pup based partscaster...have questions

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by rauchman, Jan 22, 2021.

  1. rauchman

    rauchman TDPRI Member

    Age:
    51
    Posts:
    18
    Joined:
    May 18, 2018
    Location:
    NJ
    Greetings,

    I'm in partscaster building frenzy for the last couple of years. My first was a Warmoth Tele (pretty standard configuration), then this past summer, a Warmoth Hybrid Tele (Tele with a pickguard route like a Strat...this one is using an HSH configuration), and currently building a Warmoth Velocity 2H setup.

    That Tele I built is just fantastic. Playability is great, but the sounds kick some serious booty.

    I'd like to kind of marry that sound with a Strat type trem, along with a 24.75" conversion neck.

    Has anyone used the shorter neck for a Tele and how does it affect the sound? When building the Tele Hybrid over the summer, I had also order the shorter neck (now designated for the Velocity bodied build), and loved how it made the humbuckers sound richer/fuller/thicker. Brought the tones closer to a Les Paul (which is my # 1, although the Tele now easily occupies the #2 slot with the LP getting worried). Would I lose the Tele character with the shorter neck, or will it also become thicker/richer but keep that signature Tele thing?

    Tele bridge pup mounting - As mentioned, I'd like to use a Strat type trem with the Tele bridge pup. How important is that metal bridge/pup plate for the sound? I'm guessing pretty important? Anyone know of a Tele bridge plate that only mounts the pup, but not the bridge on it? Kind of like a Tele bridge with the bridge part of hacked off, but still allows for the bridge pup to be suspended from the metal plate and also mount to the guitar?

    Many thanks!
     
  2. Zepfan

    Zepfan Doctor of Teleocity Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    10,589
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2013
    Location:
    Horn Lake, MS
    I put a Tele bridge pickup(Cavalier Fat Lion) in the bridge position of a Squier Bullet Strat. The pickup has a bottom plate and wired up without issue, but I didn't use the bridge plate to mount the pickup. Instead, I used the Strat pickguard. I had to trim out the mounting hole for the pickup a little and add the 3 screw holes, but it was easy. A little trimming inside the cavity was needed. upload_2021-1-22_16-17-30.jpeg Without the surrounding metal bridge plate, the pickup has a darker/gritty tone which is just what I wanted.
     
    rauchman, crazydave911 and PeterUK like this.
  3. BryMelvin

    BryMelvin Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    68
    Posts:
    2,180
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2014
    Location:
    Arivaca AZ
    I don't know for sure on a shorter standard neck, but I use a tele pickup on my 22 scale lap steel. Sounds like a tele pickup.

    I DO use 16-56 strings, So I would advise using heavier strings on a short scale guitar.My Grandson has a mini strat that I use 13s on for tuning stability and to make it feel normal, not playing rubber bands.
     
    crazydave911 likes this.
  4. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    76
    Posts:
    5,635
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2018
    Location:
    Washington
    Rauch, I don't have any idea what you are talking about doing with the bridge so I can't comment. However I can tell you a few things about scale length.

    In theory longer scales have more fundamentals (which people say makes the sound "plainer"), short scales have more partials (which some say makes them more "complex"). Mark French has a good discussion in his book on guitar technology, John Greven discusses in his article on voicing. Moving the neck into the body more shifts the relative locations of the pickups (particularly the neck) relative to all the nodes of the strings - there have been long arguments about whether this changes the sound.

    The big difference, of course, is that for the same tuning and strings shorter scale has less string tension - its a square function. Gibson scales have 94 percent of the tension of a Fender even tho the difference in length is 97 percent. Most people can feel this. Players also notice the difference in feel between the angled neck and flat to the body, and the differences in radius.

    There are lots of other factors that may or may not make a guitar sound more like a les paul or a tele - Gibsons are almost always mahogany bodies and necks, their necks are glued into the body instead of screwed on. LP's have different values of tone and volume pots, different capacitors, and of course have separate controls for each pickup with the ability to blend them.

    But the big difference is spelled PAF - if you want to sound like a lester get a good set of classic Gibson style humbuckers (and the electronics to go along with them)

    I'll add one other thought - I don't know if this has been done but it would be pretty easy to find out how much difference just the scale makes. The Warmoth conversion neck would make it easy to put together a guitar with a standard fender scale, play it and run it thru some analyzing software (I have a program that will show the composition of each note) and then screw a conversion neck on the same guitar and do it all over again. I'll just tuck this back in my list of things to do if someone ever asks me to put a conversion neck on their guitar.
     
    rauchman and crazydave911 like this.
  5. Zepfan

    Zepfan Doctor of Teleocity Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    10,589
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2013
    Location:
    Horn Lake, MS
    My first guitar was 24.75" scale and my second was 25.5" scale. For me, the longer scale felt tighter, seemed to have more brightness while the shorter scale was easier to play with a bit more dark tone. I liked both guitars and continued to play both.

    Later on I got a guitar with a 25" scale and immediately loved it. It was still easy to play like the shorter Gibson scale, but also had the brighter tonal attributes you'd find in a Fender scale along with the tonal attribute of the Gibson scale.
     
    crazydave911 and rauchman like this.
  6. capgun

    capgun Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    251
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2020
    Location:
    USA
    I never played one but there were Squier VM Thinlines a while back that had the 24.75 scale.

    02579345-DBC8-4108-9161-99A9C8455591.jpeg

    Capgun
     
    crazydave911 and rauchman like this.
  7. rauchman

    rauchman TDPRI Member

    Age:
    51
    Posts:
    18
    Joined:
    May 18, 2018
    Location:
    NJ
    crazydave911 and Zepfan like this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.