Concert Standouts You Have Heard

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Teleterr, May 14, 2017.

  1. Jack S

    Jack S Friend of Leo's

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    I have two shows that are standouts in my memory. The first time I saw Bruce Springsteen in Houston 1975 was the single most incredible show I ever saw live. I saw him on every tour from then through the mid 80s and that show was the tops. I believe 1978 was the last of my favorite Springsteen shows. I had many friends who got to see him in 1974 at Liberty Hall in Houston, and they all claimed that show was even better. I will never know, but 1975 was the best for me.

    The other show was my first concert I ever got to see of well known acts at the Melbourne Auditorium in either 1965 or '66, I cannot remember for sure, but probably '66. It was a surf/rock and roll/car show with bands playing 20-30 minute sets all day. All the popular surf bands were on the bill, but the standout that blew my young mind was Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels. He had so much energy and stage presence that he stole the show in my opinion. He was like a white James Brown with his incredible movements and total immersion into his performance. Springsteen was the only other performer I ever saw that put that much energy into their performance.
     
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  2. Teleterr

    Teleterr Friend of Leo's

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    Wow ! Fantastic ! ..What was the place steps away in the same cellar? I caught Stardrive and later Roger McQuinn there. It was almost too small, like you should introduce yourself to the band or something.
     
  3. jmiles

    jmiles Friend of Leo's

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    How did I forget! Jimi at The Scene club in Milwaukee. Front row center seat! It was right after he left The Monkees tour.
     
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  4. Silent Otto

    Silent Otto Tele-Meister

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    Gov't Mule/Big Sugar was a transcendental experience, other standouts would be SRV/Dire Straits, Alligator Records 20th Anniversary at the Commodore in Vancouver, Page and Plant in Van.
     
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  5. Truvor

    Truvor TDPRI Member

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    I grew up and still live in New York City. When I was a lad of about 18 - 19, in the mid-80s, Echo and the Bunnymen came out with their "Ocean Rain" album: frequently considered the Sargent Pepper of the 80s. The years between 84 and 86, the band played NYC, what seemed like at least a dozen times. Somehow, I managed to catch just about every show. This was obviously quite affordable back when shows were $10 - $15 at the door. One time I rolled up when the band already started their set and bought the last ticket off some scalper standing in front of the Paramount Theater (smaller venue at MSG) and the guy was only too willing to give it to me for $5.00! I still remember those shows as some of the best music I've ever seen/heard.
     
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  6. Teleterr

    Teleterr Friend of Leo's

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    I love when scalpers get scalped. They use to try to do the Dead shows, but no one would buy. I saw one guy just throw his to the ground after the concert started inadvertently doing his good deed of the day.
     
  7. GeorgiaHonk

    GeorgiaHonk Tele-Holic

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    This thread is stirring up some great memories. I'm another old fart who's seen way too many great shows to remember, but here's a few I do recall:

    B.B. King and Bobby "Blue" Bland: Watching these two masters trade verses was pure unadulterated joy.

    Steve Morse: I saw him several times with the Dregs and with his own band, but the standout was a solo gig in a tiny club. First set was all solo classical acoustic, second set was solo electric guitar, third set was electric guitar with prerecorded backing tapes. At the end of the show, he thanked the crowd "for proving that beer and classical music DO mix."

    Mark O'Connor: I've seen Mark everywhere from bluegrass festivals to concert halls. Just mind-blowing. The best acoustic guitarist AND the best fiddler AND one of the best mandolin players I've ever seen. And one of the most humble and genuinely nicest people you'd ever want to meet.

    Hank Williams, Jr.: Absolutely the worst concert experience I've ever had. He was 45-minutes late, and his backup band played their asses off while everybody waited. When he finally showed up he was insanely drunk, and mostly wandered around the stage taking solos on various instruments. When he sang a song he was too drunk to remember the words so he just made up lyrics, and most of these were too vulgar to repeat. What a complete loser.
     
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  8. Frontman

    Frontman Tele-Holic

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    I've been to a lot of concerts, but the one that stood out was Alabama in Louisville Kentucky. I was in the Army at the time, and got a a detail working at the show.

    I was assigned to keep people off the open area behind the sound station. The show coincided with a large truck show, and as you can imagine, there was a hell of a crowd. It was a lot of work to keep the rednecks from dancing in the aisles and open places.

    Then, one of the most beautiful girls I had ever seen walked up to me and asked why I wasn't letting anyone dance. I apologized to her, and asked her to dance with me, and we enjoyed a nice few minutes together. But then there was a shower of ice cubes, popcorn and such from the crowd, who were giving me a hard time for dancing after not allowing them to do so.

    After the show, I watched everything being packed up, and the band members getting on the bus to leave.

    I and the other soldiers who had worked at the show loaded up into a van, and headed back to Fort Knox. We were driven by a First Sergeant of the MP's, who drove as quickly as the van would go. We got held up by an old lady driving slowly in the left hand lane, and when she finally moved out of the way the First Sergeant instructed us all to put our backsides against the windows on the right side of the van. As we pulled alongside, he leaned on the horn and had us all drop our pants. Then he raced away quickly enough that she couldn't catch our US Government license plate number.

    Fun times
     
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  9. JackStraw

    JackStraw Friend of Leo's

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    Gabriel era Genesis at the Allentown Pa. farmers market. Stage was two flat bed trailers side by side with a camper trailer down some steps behind. Corn husks on the floor. I'm still in awe.
     
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  10. Rasmuth

    Rasmuth Tele-Afflicted

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    Queen with Billy Squier opening in 1983...it was a spectacular show....from start to finish.
     
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  11. El Tele Lobo

    El Tele Lobo Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I hope you got her number...
     
  12. Welker

    Welker TDPRI Member

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    I seen Guns n' Roses from the front row a couple of weeks before the Sweet Child of Mine video came out and they just exploded in popularity. They played like they were possessed. Only concert I've ever been to where people were passing out and had to be hauled over the barrier up front.
     
  13. Rythameen

    Rythameen Tele-Meister

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    2 come to mind. My very first concert ever, 1969 at the Swing Auditorium in San Bernadino. Led Zeppelin!! Opening act was a local band, then a San Francisco band, I think they were called Salt and Pepper, then Jethro Tull and finally Page and crew. It was like seeing them in a high school gym, waist high stage you could walk right up to, and it was a relatively small room. I even think they were using guitar cabinets for a PA. Tickets were $6... good times indeed.

    2nd one was the Stones in 72 in Seattle with Stevie Wonder opening. They played a ton of Exile on Main Street among others and they were in their prime. They played 2 shows, and we got to see both, tickets...$12 each show.t


    Just remembered one other, it was the Zombies in Chehalis, Washington, not sure about the year, but I was about 13 or 14 so it must have been about '66 or '67. The main reason I remember the show is they didn't even play in an auditorium. It was just a large room on the 2nd floor above the police station! My cousin and my brother got there early and the band said they would pay us to help them load in and out. So we lugged amps and drums up and down stairs before and after the show. When we stood by their van to get our pay, the road manager reached into the van and pulled out a huge box of fireworks and asked if that was sufficient pay. Being 13 to 15 years old we said "Hell Yes!!!" and trotted into the night to cause mayhem with our pay. So I guess that was actually my best concert. Even though I don't remember much about the show, I still remember those fireworks! :D:lol::D
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2017
  14. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

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    Two.

    First, Dylan, the often-maligned 1978/"Street Legal" tour. Binghamton, NY, and then, a few weeks later, Buffalo. Okay, it was Dylan doing an odd Neil Diamond version of Dylan. But it was also...Dylan. The troubadour. In turmoil. You could sense the man's desperations. His born-again conversion right at the tour's end didn't surprise me. You could see a man on his ledge through all the big-band glam. Almost as if the glam were a disguise, or a delay. Many of the versions--"It's Alright, Ma (I'm Only Bleedin')," "Blowin' in the Wind," "Senor (Tales of Yankee Power)," "Where Are You Tonight? (Journey Through Dark Heat)"--were just epic in their intensity and beautifully orchestrated. Before the Binghamton show, he sat behind the stage, and behind his shades, for a good 20 min., just chainsmoking and watching the auditorium fill up. He didn't move in that way that people have when some inner struggle is paralyzing them.
    Well, the last thing I remember before I stripped and kneeled
    Was a trainload of fools bogged down in a magnetic field
    A gypsy with a broken flag and flashing ring
    Said "Son, this ain't a dream no more--it's the real thing!"
    Senor, senor
    Let's overturn these tables
    Disconnect these cables
    This place don't make sense to me no more
    Can you tell me what we're waiting for, Senor?

    How
    many times
    Must a man look up
    Before he can see
    The sky?​

    It was Job asking for an answer. Or a break. Then and now...wow.

    Second, Gillian Welch & David Rawlings, Lyric Theatre, Blacksburg, VA. 2004?
    Exquisite show in an apt venue. Great rapport with the audience and terrific playing and singing. At one point they turned off all the amplification and just played truly live into the theatre, and the audience gave them rapt reception. One of the few concerts that did its musicians' talents full justice. You could truly hear their fingers' angles on the strings, and truly feel people absorbing the music. It helped, too, that our first-born son was there with us, a month or so before his birth. Serene evening.
     
  15. Radioking

    Radioking Tele-Meister

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    Glen Hansard is amazing live. I've seen him open for Eddie Vedder and on his last tour. If he is in your area, don't miss him, even if you have no idea who he is. If you need proof of how much he puts into his shows, here's a picture of his guitar.
    IMG_0213.JPG
     
  16. Ironwolf

    Ironwolf Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    I remember one I attended at Washington State in Pullman back in '78. Opener was some rock band I'd never heard of and can't recall anything about other than they were the opener. Next up was the e Mission Mountain Wood Band, then Headliner was the Nitty Gritty Dirtband. The show ended with the Dirt Band and Mission Mountain performing together for 3 or 4 tunes. Those two bands were awesome, and they were fan-damn-tastic together.
     
  17. uriah1

    uriah1 Telefied Gold Supporter

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    - Mahavishnu Orchestra (in their heyday)
    - Argent
    - Jethro Tull
     
  18. Electric Mud

    Electric Mud Tele-Holic

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    Have seen some great ones, but the absolute best sounding show was John Fogerty. Both times I seen him. The fidelity was phenomenal. Spot on.
     
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  19. P Thought

    P Thought Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    95% of my lifetime concert experience has come within the last 10 years. I don't go to concerts if I'm not pretty sure I'm going to love them. Favorites include:

    Grateful Dead
    Commander Cody and His Lost Planet Airmen
    Carlos Montoya
    Santana
    (the above long ago)

    Lucinda Williams
    Neil Young
    Tom Petty
    Marty Stuart
    Dwight Yoakam
    Willie Nelson
    John Anderson
    Joe Bonamassa
    Crosby, Stills, and Nash
    Bob Dylan
    James Taylor
    John Prine
    Frankie Ballard

    I couldn't rank these if I tried. All of them stirred me, some more deeply than others.

    Also we attended all three days at each of the three years of the now-defunct Cape Blanco Country Music Festival. Memorable shows there from Kenny Chesney and Brad Paisley, good shows from others I can't remember right now (Blake Shelton almost didn't make it through the traffic), and some of the warmup acts (we drove to Bend to see Frankie Ballard again) were very good. That was a fun event, close to home but the traffic was vicious, U.S. 101 being the only way there, and Curry County being one of the most isolated places in the country. Last year, an hour after pulling out, we could still see our camp spot, and it was another hour before we were on the highway, less than a mile from there. Och, tamale. I can't blame the promoters for moving the festival to Medford, but we won't be going.
     
  20. Teleterr

    Teleterr Friend of Leo's

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    Bumper to bumper... There was a time when I'd go to Dead shows and get a ticket there. It was bumper to bumper on the DC beltway so I got out and just went to every car. By the 5th car I had my ticket at the Deadhead my cost is yours price. Felt sorry for commuters.
     
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