COMPLETE : JVIN248's TeleCasso Traveling Tele 2015 Build

Discussion in '2015 TDPRI GSM Build Challenge' started by jvin248, Jun 14, 2015.

  1. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Now I attach the Walnut fingerboard.

    I plane the glue-side flat. It takes a bit of back and forth from both directions. The board seems to have fibers that are not uniformly laying in one direction, like a petting a dog with hair that sticks out both ways so you can never pet it smooth. But I get it down and get some wood ribbons from the plane.

    If it's some interest to some, this is a $15 plane I bought new a year ago at HF. If there is any poor planing it's all in the technique.
     

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  2. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I do some drilling on the back side of the fingerboard to give the truss-rod nut some clearance.

    There is some hackery in getting the area hogged out - I drilled freehand following my layout lines - the Fostner bits wandered more than I expected (regular drills I know bend and move a lot). Next time I'll use a router with a template or clamp the two boards together before installing the truss rod and drill from the end which could be problematic. Or use a fence.

    Fit looks like sufficient clearance and the wandering bit holes don't show on the finished clearance window.
     

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  3. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Gluing and clamping the fingerboard on the neck.

    A few things I debated while setting this up, was it better to clamp the fingerboard or to throw another board on top that could cause uneven clamping if some of the boards involved were not flat. I realized my little clamps could not reach all the way across so stagger clamping rather than down the center line, but that could cause twist when unclamping later.

    In the end I just clamped them all in a line and hoped for the best.

    Glue bottle, if you missed the earlier comment, is a strawberry pancake syrup container reused to hold glue. Still working fine after several weeks.
     

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  4. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Now for some layout to figure out where I am at to trim some of the extra stock off.
    I cut off the heel of the fingerboard and a strip on the side with the bandsaw.
    Carefully align the center of the template and trace around it.

    Then I realize a couple of process steps that I need to reorder and take a winding adventure.

    The top of the fingerboard is rough sawn, stained, and extra ugly but it's the raw surface from the stick of pallet wood I salvaged it from.
     

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  5. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Here are pictures of an adventure path I decided against taking this time.

    The fixture is to give a guitar neck a compound radius. It's set up as it is shown to produce a 9.5 to 16 inch compound radius. The neck attaches to the bottom of the swing arm and it rides over the top of my router table. When it works it's really sweet. When it doesn't it can quickly chew up a neck, like getting one of those Candy Land cards to go back to the last character. I'll comment on this router feature in an upcoming episode.
     

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  6. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I have watched portions of Jason Beam's guitar building thread and in one of them he uses his CNC to cut an inverted fingerboard radius. He puts down sandpaper and then sands his fingerboard to the right curvature. Just like Build Challengers that use their Stew Mac fret leveling beam.
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxxT7WzgKct7B5Nala-itEaGnWq5BTfWa

    I don't have my CNC set up yet
    http://www.tdpri.com/forum/diy-tool-shed/572879-cnc-build-shapeoko-3-kit-make-me-guitar.html
    so I decide to look up how to make molding coves on the table saw. The concept is you can make large radius arcs by pushing your molding boards at an angle across the table saw.

    Here is one example of many:

    I do this misadventure ... I decide that a ten inch fret board radius is close enough to a 9.5inch traditional that I'll use my ten inch table saw blade ... yeah, there is a radius and diameter problem in there. I push forward to see what I can do.
     
  7. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Deciding I want to make this sanding trough once and make it durable for future builds I find a piece of red oak I saved. I cut a length longer than a guitar neck and square it up with the saw and the hand plane.

    Seemed like the molding videos could get really wide arcs. I try a bunch of angles and the biggest I can get is nearly straight on sideways to the saw blade. Maybe it will do. I must have missed a secret, like start with a twenty inch saw blade. I try it. The saw does not like this work so I go slow and raise the blade up in small increments. Glad I did this outside the garage and wore a mask.

    The finished trough looks nice and consistent and seems plenty shallow to give me a nice fingerboard. The last picture here shows the post saw cut, prior to hand sanding the high spots down. I'm not too aggressive with the smoothing because the strip of sandpaper I have to use on this is pretty thick and will skip along the shape.

    .
     

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  8. Mbechmann

    Mbechmann Friend of Leo's Ad Free + Supporter

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    Whats the angle going to end up at by doing it this way? I like this idea. I might go for it as well :)
     
  9. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I put my strip of sandpaper on the trough and use duct tape to hold the ends down. Next time I will use a longer strip of sandpaper and wrap it around the ends before taping, the workpiece will hit the tape and free up the paper so I later use quick hold down clamps.

    I look at my guitar neck blank and decide I don't want to sand off all the excess uncut sides. So I bandsaw close to the lines. I sand the neck a little. It seems my neck router template will soon have trouble remaining flat on the neck if I finish radiussing. So I better do that step now while the board is still mostly flat.
     

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  10. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    On the surface this seemed like a way to go, those cove molding videos were very encouraging. However, it's quite difficult to get a ten inch radius cut by a five inch radius saw blade for the width of board I need on this sanding trough. It still seems like there should be a clever way to do this but I'll have to consider it more for a future build.

    I still use the sanding trough idea but my router comes to the rescue in 'version 2.0'.

    The trough works well, but make it longer than you think you need .. test by putting a board cut as long as a guitar neck on a flat surface and pretend you are sanding it back and forth. Measure your comfortable throw length and make your trough just a little longer than that.
     
  11. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Concerned that sanding the fretboard radius completely will give me massive heartache at the neck router template stage I pause and route around the neck.

    Here is the bit I will use. My old router, that ate its internal cooling fan blades, maybe from a chunk of wood debris it sucked up in it. could not grip this bit in the chuck and it would wander in or out, mostly out, no matter how tight I wrenched the chuck. This was why I decided not to use the swing-arm compound radius jig. The new router is much more stable and a better balanced machine. I should get a plunge router someday, but this is what I have.

    So I get a scrap piece of plywood and make a template copy from the laser-cut template that has been in the background of many pictures here. I use double sided tape and between the plywood template and the neck blank. and start cutting.

    First side goes beautifully, but by the time I get to the second side the bit has warmed up and it's pulling itself out of the chuck. There is a thermal expansion problem in there. I reposition and tighten the chuck and it still wanders out. I'm thinking I should find an up-cut and a down-cut bit to experiment with and see if it behaves better. I'm thinking it's a really good plan that I didn't try the compound radius jig.

    After a few more tightenings I finally get the cutter around the neck so it looks passable. I'll have sanding to do but I'll be carving a lot of it off later anyway.

    I have a little bit of chunkout on the lower headstock end. I was cutting it smooth anyway (planning on leaving the slight curl on the upper headstock so a player's hand doesn't slide off), but disappointed the router peeled it away.

    .
     

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  12. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Sanding commences! Just touching the edges in one picture and the next only have one spot remaining at the narrow end of the fretboard. The 80 grit sanding paper strip takes the wood off fairly quickly.

    I save a bit of the dust because I might want it later to fill the fret ends. Easy to collect now. I save it away in a drawer, hope I don't tip it over and will put it in a lidded container soon.

    The profile is finished and the board is a little thicker than I want, and the radius is much more severe than I want because it's basically a five inch radius. I can only hear the players complaining about the original 7.5inch radius fretting out when they bend. Don't want this. I had exceeded what I thought the table saw cove-making capability was. I replan my strategy.
     

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  13. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    New strategy is to make the sanding trough profile with my router. The concept is similar to some neck radiusing jigs others have used. Two pipes down the sides with a router sled having the correct arc cut in the sides of the sled to run on the rails. I need an inverted trough so my sled arc is reversed.

    "Sanding Trough Version 2.0"

    I affix and support a long board on my bandsaw, drill some holes, pin the sled board and cut the ten inch radius.

    The sled is two arcs with a flat center portion to bolt the router to and have a large hole open for the bit.

    The radius rides down the two 2x2s I clamped to a longer strip of wood so I have overhang of the sled passed the ends of the trough board.

    Move the router back and forth and increment the rotation and get a true ten inch radius tough. I run the belt sander along the oak to flatten the router marks but I don't take too much out to risk reforming the radius.

    I put a standard 9.5inch neck I have from a factory made guitar on the trough and it matches better.

    Back to sanding!
     

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  14. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    With a new trough profile I go back to sanding the fretboard.

    Pictures show how I clamp one end of the paper to the trough and wrap the free end around and under the board. Most of my sanding pressure goes one direction. I stop every so often to check the curve of the fingerboard, making sure the radius is centered along the neck, and clearing away the sawdust.

    I can see how the high center of the fingerboard is cut first out to the edges.

    The headstock end, being narrower, needs less pressure on it than the heel, so I orient the fingerboard as shown and shoot the board that way.

    Finished radius achieved. I really like how straight the grain is. I'm hopeful for the final finishing and a fantastic appearance. This piece really looks a lot like rosewood but based on the fragrance during sanding I know it's walnut. I like walnut better since it's local to me and not a rainforest-depleating wood with long transport.

    There is a little twig of a knot in the corner. It seems to carry the Picasso theme in miniature.
     

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  15. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    I cut some fret slots. I made this fancy little box then realized I needed more space for the headstock so I cut out a section to let it slip through. If I reuse the box I'll need to cut out the back side of it too for a regular Tele headstock. The saw is quite square up and down and perpendicular to the box channel. The problem is the neck is tapered So I had to use centering wedges to keep the neck aligned. I got this to work but much too fiddly.

    The saw is a Japanese-style pull saw that has a blade thin enough to match the frets. I happened to have the saw from old prior jobs. I only cut enough to score down to the edges of the fretboard. I plan to double-sided tape a strip of wood on the saw at the depth of the fret tangs and cut them deeper just before I install the frets.

    I use a little triangular file to knock the corners down a little. Like others have said, it makes inserting the frets easier, it reduces the burrs during assembly, and reduces chipout when refretting.
     

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  16. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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  17. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    The guitar this is on is a cheap Strat Clone. I knew the neck felt really nice but when I measured it up to match the usual thicknesses and widths of necks everything from the super fat to the wizard thin only varied by a few millimeters. Except the carve.

    The thinnest feeling necks start that first facet from the leading edge of the fingerboard and then arch right back. Tele necks more often start the carve further back from the fretboard. This feature seems to be the largest factor that I have found between the chunkier feeling necks and the sharp butter-knife edged ones that my fingers cramp trying to get some cords.

    The attached diagram shows a comparison between where this side facet carve starts. Width and thickness measurements of A and C can be identical but the feel will be very different as sketch D shows.
     

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  18. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .
    I round up GuitarBuilder's back of the neck measurements and convert to metric because I find I make fewer mistakes in millimeters. Draw some lines and carve with my rasp.

    I use a rag under the neck and clamp it down with a surface clamp I got years ago.
     

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  19. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .
    Next I use a flat shoe rasp. It cuts finer than the rasp plus it is wider so I can keep the neck straight.

    I scribe lines in between the other facet lines and cut again until it looks like a guitar neck.

    It feels quite chunky.
    .
     

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  20. wadeeinkauf

    wadeeinkauf Tele-Holic

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    Thanks for sharing your path toward finding a way build your tools to do the radiusing of the fretboard. It is always fun to follow the thought process. I love the Crimson Guitars videos on Youtube. Ben does the radius just using a plane and eyeballing it. I wish I could use a hand plane.
    Wade
     
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