Compensated saddles

Wrighty

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Some like 'em, some don't. The stock, smooth steel saddles on my CS '55 intonated reasonably well but I like to tinker with such things, so.....

Bought a set of compensated Callaham steels, they setup very accurately and retained the original biting tone. Installed a set of Bensonite brass last night and have not yet rendered final judgement. They are massive by comparison and acoustically there is an audible difference, fatter and warmer, but amplified that difference is not so apparent. I will say they do not intonate as well as the Callaham set. When the B string is right on the money, the high E is sharp......when the D is right on, the G is sharp. While this inaccuracy is minor it does bug me, particularly knowing the perfection of the Callaham saddles.

So what are your experiences with compensated saddles? Anyone installed either of these.....the Callaham and/or Bensonite? Your impressions of these or other saddles sets that have impressed you?

View attachment 1053357
If your saddles really need compensating you should maybe engage a no win no fee lawyer.
 

AndrewG

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I just couldn’t live with wonky saddles, just looking at that pic. kicks in my slight OCD tendency.
I get you: I bought a Strat once. After about a week of loving it I noticed that the logo said 'Stratcaster' not Stratocaster. I guess the transfer got kinked or whatever. That was it for me, it went back to the shop!
 

Wrighty

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I got a steering wheel cover a few days ago. It looks cool and feels really nice. Wouldn’t it be a little odd if someone saw it and told me it won’t make me a better driver?

I don’t believe there are that many players who actually think that swapping out hardware is going to make them a better guitarist. I interact with hundreds of players regularly and can’t think of a single one.

When it comes to saddles, most of the time guys just want to improve their intonation, or make their guitar look different, or feel a little better. What’s wrong with that?
I know more players who blame the guitar for their bad fretting or whatever but who don’t do anything about it……………..if they did, they’d have nothing to blame their bad fretting or whatever on!
 

TwangerWannabe

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I get you: I bought a Strat once. After about a week of loving it I noticed that the logo said 'Stratcaster' not Stratocaster. I guess the transfer got kinked or whatever. That was it for me, it went back to the shop!
Fender also messed up at one point and had Tratocaster on the headstock instead of Stratocaster.
 

Kmaxbrady

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Again, nothing wrong with it if it makes you believe whatever it is you're trying to accomplish. But believing and what is actually happening can in many cases be very differnt things. Plus, you sell those saddles so why wouldn't you attempt to come up with reasons why people should buy the product? I have never had issues with intonation any of my Teles with Fender brass sales, there's nothing inferior about them or the material they are made of and they just work evidenced by the countless Teles that have been used by professionals in the past and continue to use to this day. I'd rather take that money saved and put it toward something else that actually matters and makes a difference to me. But you're a salesman, so your job is to convince me otherwise that I need to buy something that has never even been an issue for my guitars.
No, I’m only trying to convince you to not misjudge those who approach the hobby differently than you do. If I were just being a salesman you wouldn’t have seen me defending the products of my competitors. Like gotoh for example, great saddles, and they’re almost half the price of Bensonite. If I didn’t make my own I’d buy those in a second.
 

Wrighty

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When it comes to affordable saddles and other hardware the priorities in the design are:
1. Cheap
2. Quick and Easy to make
And there’s nothing wrong with that, it’s great that there are good products at every price point. The difference in the high end stuff is that good design is prioritized over cost to manufacture. The law of diminishing returns levels off pretty low with this stuff. But the cost difference between something that works just fine, and something a little nicer is only about $25-30
Up to a point, but what, really, are the design costs of a brass barrel with a couple of flats on it and a threaded hole in the middle? The time spent sweating over a drawing board in Leo’s day was probably paid back from the first couple of hundred Tele’s sold. Now days designing a ‘new’ saddle is more a case of thinking up a convincing sales spiel to get people to buy it!
 

TwangerWannabe

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No, I’m only trying to convince you to not misjudge those who approach the hobby differently than you do. If I were just being a salesman you wouldn’t have seen me defending the products of my competitors. Like gotoh for example, great saddles, and they’re almost half the price of Bensonite. If I didn’t make my own I’d buy those in a second.
I'm not misjudging anyone. I'm being blunt by saying that may will attempt to go down the path of swapping this or that or changing out a bunch of stuff on their guitars instead of actually playing them thinking that those changes will get them to where they want to be as a player. Those folks are just lying to themselves. It's so much easier to convince yourself that you're doing something good for your playing because you spent money on it, but in many cases it's snake oil.
 

Kmaxbrady

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Up to a point, but what, really, are the design costs of a brass barrel with a couple of flats on it and a threaded hole in the middle? The time spent sweating over a drawing board in Leo’s day was probably paid back from the first couple of hundred Tele’s sold. Now days designing a ‘new’ saddle is more a case of thinking up a convincing sales spiel to get people to buy it!
You’d be surprised how much more it can cost to make something based on a difference in design. The Wilkinson design is cheapest because it’s very easy and fast to make. You could do it in your garage with some cheap old equipment. Some would say that the mastery bridge is way over priced but I’ve taken one apart and seen what goes into it, it’s a fairly complex design and would require much more sophisticated machinery and higher skilled labor to maintain quality and hold tolerances.
 

Wrighty

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You’d be surprised how much more it can cost to make something based on a difference in design. The Wilkinson design is cheapest because it’s very easy and fast to make. You could do it in your garage with some cheap old equipment. Some would say that the mastery bridge is way over priced but I’ve taken one apart and seen what goes into it, it’s a fairly complex design and would require much more sophisticated machinery and higher skilled labor to maintain quality and hold tolerances.
I think we may be at cross purposes? I was referring purely to the saddles. As an (ex) engineer I totally agree that designing and putting into production a complete bridge unit is by no means a five minute job. It must also be borne in mind that they will sell in relatively low numbers in comparison with, say, car part.
 

Kmaxbrady

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I think we may be at cross purposes? I was referring purely to the saddles. As an (ex) engineer I totally agree that designing and putting into production a complete bridge unit is by no means a five minute job. It must also be borne in mind that they will sell in relatively low numbers in comparison with, say, car part.
Very true my friend
 

Kmaxbrady

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I'm not misjudging anyone. I'm being blunt by saying that may will attempt to go down the path of swapping this or that or changing out a bunch of stuff on their guitars instead of actually playing them thinking that those changes will get them to where they want to be as a player. Those folks are just lying to themselves. It's so much easier to convince yourself that you're doing something good for your playing because you spent money on it, but in many cases it's snake oil.
Perhaps. But maybe most of those guys are doing both? I have a good friend who is constantly buying expensive guitars and tinkering with high end gear. AND, he can play circles around me.

But even if he couldn’t, even if he completely sucked, what would be so wrong about him enjoying the hobby in his own way? If he’s more of a collector and a tinkerer than a player why would we assume he’s “lying to himself”? Why insult him by calling the things he loves snake oil?
 

TwangerWannabe

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Perhaps. But maybe most of those guys are doing both? I have a good friend who is constantly buying expensive guitars and tinkering with high end gear. AND, he can play circles around me.

But even if he couldn’t, even if he completely sucked, what would be so wrong about him enjoying the hobby in his own way? If he’s more of a collector and a tinkerer than a player why would we assume he’s “lying to himself”? Why insult him by calling the things he loves snake oil?
We’re talking about two completely different things here. But whatever it takes to get people to buy your product, go for it. There’s always a sucker out there with cash burning a hole in their pocket.
 




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