Common courtesy

Midgetje94

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My wife told me that, in rural Saskatchewan, old farmers driving in their pickups would doff their ball caps when going past a cemetery.
To the OP I tip when I pass. Remove when I shake hands during greeting. To removing past cemetery I’ve never noticed that. But do remove my hat anytime I pass a Half Mast Flag
 

Midgetje94

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ive seen guys wear hats in church right up to the moment of prayer, only to replace it at "amen". Like its an oxygen mask or something.

This baffles me, as its not just yutes, and it also shows some sort of cognizance of protocol, while still not adhering completely.
I haven’t stepped foot in a church in years (outside of my wedding and a funeral). But that’s me. I’m comfortable in a ball cap. I’d wear it to church. I’d remove it for prayer.

Assuming the Christian mentality and beliefs are right. That would mean god is the creator of all. Not to dog anyone’s values. BUT if that’s true, I really doubt he cares what you wear. I mean those closest to him were once seen as the worst of characters. Jesus himself only stepped into a church once if I recall correctly. And what did he do? Ransacked it. The people around you make the fellowship. Not the building or rituals
 

swarfrat

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I haven’t stepped foot in a church in years (outside of my wedding and a funeral). But that’s me. I’m comfortable in a ball cap. I’d wear it to church. I’d remove it for prayer.

Assuming the Christian mentality and beliefs are right. That would mean god is the creator of all. Not to dog anyone’s values. BUT if that’s true, I really doubt he cares what you wear. I mean those closest to him were once seen as the worst of characters. Jesus himself only stepped into a church once if I recall correctly. And what did he do? Ransacked it. The people around you make the fellowship. Not the building or rituals
I can't really address this without getting into religion (which means the post I'm responding to is as well), but it's not just a British/American victorian cultural thing..
 

Blackmore Fan

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I never swear in public, or mixed company for that matter. Trust me I know ALL of the bad words and a few I have invented but they do not come out in public. It took a while for me to realize it was really more to differentiate myself from the crowd more than having to do with etiquette(though there is some of that). I have seen so many people actually act awkward and even annoyed when it dawned on them. I guess it says something about the current state of american society that a note of decorum is sometimes more noteworthy than a lack thereof.

This is a bigger one for me. I too know all of the curse words. But I try like the dickens to reserve them for moments when "the chips are down"--some sort of crisis is in play. It amazes me the casualness some employ when throwing out f-bombs. We've invited in guest speakers that have something to sell who start throwing those words around. We like to think of ourselves as professionals, and as such, calm and collected. To see people tossing around such words is off-putting--we're not at war here, not literally, and not even figuratively in most situations.
 

johnny k

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I take it not many guys here wore their baseball hats with the brim off center, or sideways. :)
but when they do they have got those
1674631278933.png
 

Smokin OP

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My mother did not like wearing of hats in the house and if you sat down to eat, she would ask you to take it off. I wear hats all the time to protect my face from the sun & more times than not I take if off when I go in a home or business. Old habits....
 

Jupiter

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It depends entirely on the hat. If you are wearing a proper hat (stovepipe topper for rich people without jobs and a bowler hat for rich people with jobs), then you should touch the brim before speaking to an equal and go full doff when listening to the National Anthem, entering church, addressing a lady (by which, of course, I mean anyone on a spectrum from Mary Poppins up to a Duchess) or when entering the billiards room of your club.

If you are wearing anything else on your head then, to a degree, you are off the hook because your headgear is in no way a proper hat. As such, normal rules of etiquette do not apply. Unless, of course, you are on holiday in a sunny clime, in which case your fedora counts. Or you are an army officer, a bishop or a don, in which case whatever bizarre contraption you have on your head probably counts. If in doubt, ask yourself "does my headgear feature a skull and crossbones or some red roses twisted round a gun barrel or does it proclaim my adherence to a sporting team, a local fishing tackle shop or a wholesale supplier of tractor parts?"

If this describes your headgear, then unless you are drinking beer in the pub, snoozing in a deckchair in your back garden or are conducting business in a fishing tackle shop or with a wholesale supplier of tractor parts, you will find it necessary to spend most of your time clutching your headgear in front of your chest with both hands as you cringe deferentially before the correctly attired.

(Source: Cheapside and Lickspittle's Almanac For The Modern Gentleperson, 123rd edition, p. 1765).
This was impressive
 

Tonetele

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I wear aPnama hat in summer and a Cattleman hat in colder weather on walks. Generally it's good manners to take it off indoors. Even really remote pubs in isolated cattle country have hat racks. Just don't touch another man's hat.
 

Manual Slim

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How many people will hold a door open for someone? I always thought that was a polite thing to do. In the last few years I have noticed that fewer and fewer people will say thank you as they walk through. I'm not looking for a thank you, but a common courtesy should get a common courtesy in kind. It seems like a trivial thing, but sometimes it's the little things like common courtesy that can make things just a little better for everyone.
If I do something for someone and they don't thank me then my reward is the warm sense of satisfaction I feel about being the better person.
 




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