Cold weather finish

Jim_in_PA

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cruiser32

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I've sprayed lacquer in the cold with no ill affects. With the bodyneck /paint at room temp. I step outside, do my coat quickly, and then retreat indoors for it to dry. The odor is minimal and I just run my ceiling fan with a nearby door ajar for ventilation.

That's what I've done in the past with no ill effects. The wife thinks it's a bit stinky in the kitchen after I spray, since I do it out the sliding back door, but then I run it into my home office and into the closet to hang. Works just fine.
 

JoeyClark

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Brushing: So far I'm pretty happy with Crystalac and Solarez: I can't believe it's not lacquer, which is UV cured. Pretty crazy how it works.
^

+1 on the Solarez suggestion. Been using it for grain filler. Haven't tried pigmenting it. Don't think that would work too well. But it'll do clear coats.
 

gb Custom Shop

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Winters in Canada are pretty much a no go for spraying outside, especially when its like -30 celsius. I have a small spray booth in my basement shop with ventilation that goes outside. It could be bigger, but it works fine. And I just spray water based Crystalac. I recently started using Osmo hardwax oil for necks, and prior to that I've always just used Tru Oil for necks. They work a tad differently but both are great, and got no issues with applying them in the basement. Here's one finished with the above products IMG-20210927-WA0004~2.jpg
 

Peegoo

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Do a traditional gunstock finish.

I do it by sanding the wood smooth to 220, and then applying boiled linseed oil and rubbing it in with 400-grit sandpaper. The paper picks up a little of the wood, which creates a slurry that fills the pores. Multiple applications of this method build a hard finish that's really beautiful, and it's impervious to the weather.

I used the gunstock method on this ash Strat-o-Tele.

Ash-Strato-Tele.jpg
 

montyveda

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A good alternative to wet sanding the TruOil IMHO was lite hand buffing with 0000 steel wool. In the end, several coats of J&J paste wax. See my avi.
That's interesting... I figured Tru-oil was the ideal final finish... what purpose does the additional wax serve?

Do a traditional gunstock finish.

I do it by sanding the wood smooth to 220, and then applying boiled linseed oil and rubbing it in with 400-grit sandpaper. The paper picks up a little of the wood, which creates a slurry that fills the pores. Multiple applications of this method build a hard finish that's really beautiful, and it's impervious to the weather.

I used the gunstock method on this ash Strat-o-Tele.

Ash-Strato-Tele.jpg
That is a gorgeous amalgamation of shape and style... love it!
 

Medeltids

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I saw a mention of the Tru Oil/Armour All finish a few months ago and was intrigued. Did a bit more digging and found this thread in another forum:

https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=331108&highlight=blond

I went ahead and tried it and it worked well. Takes a bit of practice (the key seems to be using just a small amount of Armour All - follow the thread recommendations) but I was able to achieve a nice satin finish. I imagine more work would yield a nice gloss finish. Several months out and it’s holding up fine...no stickiness, gummy, nastiness. One can easily apply many coats in a day.
I can’t speak to how well this would work in cold conditions.
 




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