Coin collectors? WWII era Oz & Kiwi...

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by trapdoor2, Oct 27, 2021.

  1. trapdoor2

    trapdoor2 Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    Just opened up a shoebox and found a baggie of Aussie and Kiwi coins. Half-penny, one penny, 3d, sixpence, shilling, florin, half-crown. Plus a couple of Honolulu bus tokens, some sales tax tokens and two Indian-head pennies (1896, 1899)

    Earliest date on the Oz/Kiwi stuff is 1911, most are 1930-1942.

    Dad was flying PBYs all over the area 1942-1944.
    20211027_112550.jpg 20211027_112421.jpg
     
  2. uriah1

    uriah1 Telefied Gold Supporter

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    Cool.
     
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  3. elihu

    elihu Poster Extraordinaire

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    I used to collect American coins with my dad. We were serious about it and tried to obtain key dates in the best condition we could afford. Looking back as an investment coins didn’t live up to expectations. But as a reminder of the pleasant hours spent with my Dad in a shared pursuit they are priceless.

    Flying all over the South Pacific in a PBY…how cool is that?
     
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  4. trapdoor2

    trapdoor2 Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    I guess it depended on if one were being shot at or not! Dad turned 20 in 1942 and it shows in his logbooks. Almost every new island they visited, he noted, "No Natives!!" I suspect he had heard of the half-naked island girls (and he did bring back some snaps of such things). Quite a few entries were: "no natives, many Marines and a few Navy..."
     
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  5. elihu

    elihu Poster Extraordinaire

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    That’s the same reason we used to carefully examine National Geographic magazine!
     
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  6. chezdeluxe

    chezdeluxe Doctor of Teleocity

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    If you have an Australian 1930 one penny coin in that collection it is extremely valuable.
     
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  7. trapdoor2

    trapdoor2 Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    No such luck. They date from 1911 (which was a first year of issue) to 1927 in the George V format and 1934 to 1943 in the "Kangaroo" (George VI) format.

    I've never had any luck with coins. My brother used my Grandmother's tin of Indian Head pennies to buy 45rpm records in the 50s. They're not all that valuable even today but...

    It appears that many of these coins have value above their face denominations. Of course, you can find them on ebay for crazy prices. The Honolulu bus token runs the gamut from $0.99 to $200 for examples that look identical to me. Same with all of them. I would expect some would actually sell for less than a dollar...they're in poor condition.

    I've checked them all out on a numismatic website that specializes in Aus, NZ and UK coins...nothing of great value. The Kiwi Half-crown from 1936 is listed at $45 and one of the Aussie King Geo. VI pennies from 1938 is in good enough condition to maybe go for $40.

    Still, and I was conservative with my grading (which means nothing, really) the whole pile totals $765 but I doubt I'd get 35% of that from a dealer. Maybe $250...
     
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  8. JL_LI

    JL_LI Poster Extraordinaire

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    That’s so cool. I have a shoe box with bags of foreign money, money from almost every country I’ve visited. Bills, coins, railroad passes. I never changed left over cash back to dollars. I kept it in case I ever went back. I’d have local currency to start out with. Most of it can probably still be used but in some countries the money has changed. But a Venezuelan 10,000 Bolivar note was close to worthless back them. It’s probably worth just about as much as a curiosity now. I doubt I’ll get back to most of those places in the time I have left but my grandkids will love to play with the money. I may just bring the shoebox with me next time I see them.
     
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  9. koen

    koen Friend of Leo's

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    Picks for life!
     
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  10. HoodieMcFoodie

    HoodieMcFoodie Telefied Ad Free Member

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    You can clean off a sixpence and bake it into a Christmas pudding. The person who gets that piece will (supposedly) enjoy wealth and good luck for the following year.
     
  11. Telekarster

    Telekarster Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    Wow man... that's very cool. I bet he had some stories to tell! Do you know if any of those coins are silver?
     
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  12. AJBaker

    AJBaker Friend of Leo's

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    Neat!

    Funny, in Switzerland the coins of that era are mostly still in circulation! Our coins in more or less their current form were introduced in 1850, and some haven't been changed for decades. The current versions are from:

    5 cents: 1981 (colour change from silver to yellow, but all versions up to 1879 are still legal tender)
    10 cents: 1879 (oldest coin in the world still in circulation)
    20 cents: 1939 (older versions look the same, but the alloy can't be read by slot machines)
    1/2 franc: 1967 (changed from silver to cupro-nickel. Also true for 1,2 and 5Fr. coin, but the silver versions are still legal tender.)
    1 franc: (1967)
    2: franc: (1967)
    5 franc: (1967. Worth about 6$. Highest value 'normal' coin in the world)


    With AUS/NZ money, did you have the same system as the UK with shilling and pence?
     
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  13. kranz

    kranz Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    My father spent the war in the Pacific. Australia, Philippines, New Guinea. He recorded his travels on the back of a 10 shilling note.

    TenShillings1of2.jpg TenShillings2of2.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2021
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  14. HoodieMcFoodie

    HoodieMcFoodie Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Yes. Up until 14th Feb 1966 Australian currency was £sd (Pound / shilling / pence)
     
  15. trapdoor2

    trapdoor2 Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    All the silver looking ones are, um, silver. Both Mom and Dad's wedding rings were made from Aussie Florins...by Dad. You can read the coin dates inside their rings.

    You had to pry stories out of dad and he would often just change the subject. He was totally serious about his WWII-era commitment to national security, even when it was laughably unnecessary.
     
  16. Telekarster

    Telekarster Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    This was pretty much true of all the WW2 vets I ever knew, and I knew plenty of em. I knew B17 tailgunners, Iwo Jima survivors, 1 Army General, and pretty much all branches of service. I never pryed but if they brought it up, which was extremely rare, then I'd press em for stories. Man... the stories I've heard.... wow. Once you got em talking, at least in my exp, they would really open up.

    That's neat man! Was he a jeweller or just really good at crafts like this? I guess I need to go through some of the coins my Dad had... some of those you have look familiar to me, my guess is he picked em up somehow in the Navy.
     
  17. Brad Pittiful

    Brad Pittiful Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    my uncle was in ww2 and in europe...brought back some coins...when he died my aunt gave me his coins...he had a lot of german coins and they used junk metal and now some are cracking and/or crumbling...sad...some are cool looking
     
  18. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    The fronts (obverse) are so familiar from Canadian, Maritimes and UK coins. But the reverse, quite interesting and cool.
     
  19. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

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    +1 and kudos to your dad!
     
  20. trapdoor2

    trapdoor2 Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    Dad said he used the spoon method to make the ring. I always thought he was kidding me about that, however, you can watch people do it on youtube.
     
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