CNC Build - Shapeoko 3 kit - "Make Me A Guitar"

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by jvin248, Jul 9, 2015.

  1. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    [​IMG]

    I am documenting my Shapeoko-3 kit build.
    Unfortunately I did not receive it in time for my 2015 Challenge Build: Traveling Telecaster, so now this machine may prove to only be a distraction.

    Background: I have been monitoring the small shop CNC market for several years and have often considered either starting with kits or building from scratch. The hurdle was usually the motor controller and software chain to design and translate to the machine. Often too many variables seemed more risky than I wanted to undertake.
    One of the usual CNC kit players had a system selling for the price of a MIM Tele earlier this year and I almost bought it. I saw where people were doubling up the cross-bars of this other model so they could improve rigidity for larger tables and generally lots of modding going on, a very active industry right now for many brands and builds. Some fantastic build threads on TDPRI CNCs too!
    Then I saw where Carbide 3D had put up design specifications and pre-orders for the Shapeoko-3 model they just finished designing. It was more money than the other model I was interested in, more the street price of a MIA Tele, but I immediately liked the thicker box beams, the expansion kits planned to cut up to 4x8 sheets with these beams, and the heavier duty NEMA 23 motors to push around routers more substantial than those used for fret slotting - perhaps large routers that make quick work of a carve-top body or a guitar neck.

    The Realistic Goal: I do automotive engineering consulting and have really needed to learn more recent CAD systems. Most places I work with have a pretty good CAD team, but there are times that whipping up something quick could help others conceptualize an idea. I also want to get the skills and tools to go from art to part rather than relying on outside prototype shops, especially for simple items. Which all provides additional marketable services for my client's projects.

    The Dream Goal: Press a button to command this genie to "Make Me A Guitar!" :D

    We'll see how this all turns out.

    The Guitar Genie arrives in a heavy little box:

    .
     

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  2. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Unboxing the kit and looking at all the parts! They do a good job kitting up the shipment.

    I remember the build instruction notes at the site said something about a two hour build time to assemble all the pieces.

    I suspect I may find it will be "Two hours to build, a lifetime to master" but we'll see.

    .
     

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  3. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    The box beams with a marker for size comparison.

    If you look close you can see the marker comes with the kit of tools. I think that's to write on the "built by" serial number sticker also in the kit, but I'll need to go through the instructions to know for sure.

    Assembly Instructions

    Several Assembly videos

    Wiki page
     

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  4. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I'll watch....:). I'm interested is seeing how much better it is than the Shapeoko 2 I have.
     
  5. thecableguy

    thecableguy Friend of Leo's

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    Very cool! I'll be watching as well. What's the cutting envelope of the machine? Those extrusions look pretty solid!
     
  6. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Quoted cutting area of the kit is 16 x 16 x 3inch
    Machine kit is around 24 x 24 x ??inch

    Router holder block is sized for a DeWalt router. I have a Harbor Freight 1/4inch that is smaller than the hole in the bracket and a 1/2in-1HP router that is too big. I will likely shim the trim router, cut out a new chunk of aluminum, and latch on the big router since that is really what I want it to run if the machine will handle the torque. Otherwise I'll buy the recommended DeWalt router it's built for since that will have more than my trim router. This will be down the road.

    They have an expension pack in the works for 4x8ft plywood jobs. I'm looking to get only one longer beam for guitar necks. Capability to do a neck through bass would be nice :lol:
     
  7. BluesBlooded

    BluesBlooded Friend of Leo's

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    I'll stay tuned for future updates. How is it driven, screw, rack and pinion or belt? Can't make it out on the picture.
     
  8. Maxbra

    Maxbra Tele-Meister

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  9. BluesBlooded

    BluesBlooded Friend of Leo's

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    Thanks Max
     
  10. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Progress building the base and the Y-axis end plates plus motors.
    Build notes are to use the short wired motors for these.

    The assembly is easy for nine and twelve year olds so far. Other than the fight about who assembled more and who's turn it is to have the allen wrench ... it seems to be building smoothly. Excited build team to push ahead.

    .
     

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  11. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I found the pdf build instructions were less detailed than necessary to build the X-Z axis module. The isometric images provided hid some of the components and description did not give quite enough sequencing. So I've added a few pictures of the internals.

    Note the pulley wheel on the one motor with the standoffs is reversed from the other motors, easiest to see where the collar is located. I only loosely fit the pulleys since I expect adjustments will be needed again when the belts are added. My build assistants had one set of bearing wheels reversed so the flanges were centered not on the outside (operator error), easily fixed. The lower belt pully was unclear in the instructions and my assistants used a too-small screw, the wrong collar standoff. Still a few parts remain to put on (belt and springs).

    Note on initial tools: The build instructions suggest getting a digital caliper to measure parts during the build. We used one I had but quickly we transitioned to the little metric ruler on the lower left of the completed axis module picture as that has good enough discrimination to sort parts. Perhaps later we will pull out the calipers again but it's not necessary so far.
     

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  12. Guitar novice

    Guitar novice Tele-Afflicted

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    I'm watching this build with interest. Your challenge build is going well. I'd imagine this is going to be an added distraction!

    Could be on my shortlist for the next project.

    Cheers

    Matthew
     
  13. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Thanks for the note on the challenge build. I saw you just finished yours. Sounds great, looks great.

    My assistants and I went to the local Maker Faire this last weekend and sat in on a seminar for CNC printers. As the discussion got into general hobbiest and near-hobbiest CNC a couple of things to check out: PocketNC just closed their Kickstarter funding and are building units (not sure when they will have regular units to market, however it's pricier than this S-3 I'm building); Beaglebone "Black" controller could be fun to experiment with later; LinuxCNC has been forked into Machinekit.io which may be useful for the software stack I'll need to make parts with the S-3 machine.
     
  14. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Making progress on the CNC machine...

    A few setbacks ... found the build team reversed one of the y-axis plates so had to dissassemble one side and rebuild. Similarly, had the wrong cross-axis channel so had to swap two of the channels when it came time to attach the machine control module.

    Picture of the Android laptop with the build instructions, you'll need a computer or something to display all the build information and search the wiki. In this picture you can see the two Y-axis plates that are identical, they should be mirror images of each other.

    My HF 1/4inch Trim Router body is too small for the provided holder block. Picture shows a section of drain pipe cut to fill the gap. I had to OD-grind the pipe to get it down in thickness so the router body would wedge in there.
     

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  15. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    X-Z axis assembled on channel with two Y-axis motors.

    Y axis channels assembled to the base with the waste board.

    We loosened the waste board and lower frame to push it into as square as the beams and plates are then tightened it back down.

    Belts and electronics attached. A little bit of tensioning of the belts. The control board is easily marked for which motor connector to attach where.

    Belt end details we used, since the instruction build sheets were not entirely clear on this point. A little technique in getting the belts tight at the ends.

    Loosen the four bolts on each motor and lift the motor to tension each of the belts in turn and clamp the four bolts back down.
     

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  16. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'll need to check through the build notes.

    The two pictures below show how much slop is in the Z-axis to rotate the vertical plate. This is looking down from the top of the X-axis cross rail down passed the plate the router is mounted on. Look at the gap at the far bottom between the beam and the black plate where the bottom set of bearings ride.

    It won't take much router torque during cuts to get a hiccup and be 5mm off location. This is with the adjustment nuts tightened as much as they go.

    Edit: The cam nuts needed more rotation and I was able to firm it all up nice and tight.

    Now I'm working on the software side.
     

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    Last edited: Aug 10, 2015
  17. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    With no power, the motors can be pushed around the frame. When you do so, a little blue LED lights up.

    I plugged the power cord into the back of the unit and turned it on. The motors all lock in position awaiting my command to do something. I'll have to read up and see how to get the 'hello world' program in there. The blue light is on.
     
  18. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    The motors become generators and are powering the blue light when you move it mechanically by hand. Don't shock yourself during the wiring process.... I found that out on one assembly once.
     
  19. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    The computer can now tell the CNC machine what to do! This took a while today sorting the software out but the basics are included here.

    My pc is running Debian Linux (latest version 8 "Jessie") and most of the documentation and ShapeOko-3 (SO3) CNC support threads are focused on Windows, as expected.

    If you have an old pc around that you don't use you can download and install Linux and have something working well, cheap, and durable. My computer is a 2006 vintage Dell laptop that shipped with Windows XP. I don't think it will run Windows 7... It will do some decent work, like producing my 2015 Challenge Build video.
    Debian.org or other flavors http://distrowatch.com/dwres.php?resource=major
    Linux uses fewer system resources than Windows so often an 'old slow' Windows machine can be a nimble Linux machine.

    Installed, via Synaptic "arduino" and "arduino-core" (you can use "apt-get install" commands for those programs too)

    Hook up the USB cable between the machine (powered on) and the pc and issue some terminal prompt commands to check connections:

    See if the system recognizes what is attached.
    $ dmsg
    usb 4-2: Product: Shapeoko 3
    usb 4-2: Manufacturer: Carbide 3D, LLC
    usb 4-2: SerialNumber: XxXxXxXxXxX
    cdc_acm 4-2:1.0: ttyACM1: USB ACM device

    There is a little red flashing led that tells when commands are going back and forth from the pc to the machine's controller.

    Did it create the serial port link?
    $ ls /dev/ttyA*
    /dev/ttyACM0

    See privileges on the serial port link
    $ ls -l /dev/ttyACM0
    crw-rw---- 1 root dialout 166, 0 Aug 23 13:01 /dev/ttyACM0

    Ensure USER has access to serial USB ports, using root terminal access
    root$ usermod -a -G dialout USER
    root$ usermod -a -G tty USER

    Check that the user has these groups now (tty and dialout)
    $ groups
    USER tty dialout cdrom floppy audio dip video plugdev netdev scanner bluetooth lpadmin

    Reboot the machine. Some of the instructions say log out and log back in. I found it took a full reboot.

    Get some software to send machine code to the CNC motors.
    https://github.com/winder/Universal-G-Code-Sender
    scroll down to most recent "Stable" release, download, and unzip the files into a folder. I created /USER/CNC and put the files in there.

    Using Terminal go in and
    $ cd CNC
    $ java -jar -Xmx256m UniversalGcodeSender.jar

    Select
    port /dev/ttyACM0
    115200 baud
    Open
    Machine Control
    millimeters

    Then use the mouse to click on the X, Y, Z buttons. If everything worked the motors should respond with indexing the unit. Mine didn't the first time around since I hadn't yet found the port permissions solution noted above, so if you're following along you can go into the root account terminal and launch the UniversalGcodeSender program and it should work. I wanted my normal user to run it so had to change the permissions.

    Whew!
     
  20. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    Now for the famous Hello World program.

    Download and save in a convenient location. I put mine in the CNC folder I created previously
    http://docs.carbide3d.com/article/37-shapeoko-3-hello-world

    Launch UniversalGcodeSender, go to "File Mode" and load the file up. The link above walks through the steps of setting zero point and so on.

    Here's my completed Hello!
     

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