Classic Vibe Necks - WTF?!!

Discussion in 'Squier Tele Forum' started by jshape, Jun 17, 2019.

  1. jrblue

    jrblue Friend of Leo's

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    "Classic Vibe" = not classic. It's like a "tribute" -- that is, a superficial resemblance not extending to substance. I thought it was a ridiculous, though accurate, name for a guitar. Way back when, it would be called "cheap imitation."
     
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  2. soulman969

    soulman969 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Yes, it's the Matt Freeman model. Great feeling neck. I've modified it with a Bill Lawrence/Wilde P46 pickup and a Babicz FCH Bridge. I'm a long time PBass fan and that one is as good as any I've even owned. It's one bass I will never sell.

    I also had an original CV Jazz until just recently but sold it in order to buy a G&L Kiloton. That one was also a very good bass but I have a G&L L2500 which kind of took it's place and was ready for a change. The Kilo is a bit like a P/J Bass tonally but with a single MFD pickup in the "sweet spot" and PBass type volume and treble controls. More mid focused than a Fender PBass and more aggressive than a Jazz.

    I've always believed the MIC Classic Vibe Basses were the all stars of the CV Series. They were almost too good for the price and I'm more than willing to speculate it's why Fender discontinued them. Not only were they competition for the MIM Series but I believe the original and artist versions were actually better.

    In over 50 years of owning and playing Fender Basses I know that no MIA PBass or Jazz Bass I owned was any better than those Squier CVs once I installed Bill Lawrence pickups in them. It's been disappointing to watch Fender do away with them entirely in order to better support their MIM product line.

    This is one reason I've turned to G&L's Tribute Series. Those guitars and basses can be had used for the price of the original Squier CVs and IMHO they are far superior to Fender's Standard MIM lines. I feel they are where Leo would have eventually taken Fender had he not sold the company in 1965.
     
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  3. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Friend of Leo's

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    These factories (like Cort, or whoever else it is) are already set up to slap together slab-board Fender style necks with headstock-adjust truss rods. Part of the reason the CVs and VMs are as cheap as they are is likely that the factory didn't have to change much about their neck making process to produce the necks for these.

    Used CV or VM body with a used Classic Series MIM neck is the ticket for a very affordable, yet quite vintage accurate, Fender that actually says Fender on the headstock. The Squier pickups are good enough IMO, but the better craftsmanship of the MIM Classic Series neck goes a long way toward making the guitar feel like it's better put together.
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2019
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  4. soulman969

    soulman969 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    In inception they were more or less "tribute" models of classic '50s and '60s designs but with modern specs
    but that was 10 years ago or more. Fender continued to add to the CV Series and expand it greatly from what began as a half dozen models. IME some are better than others but none are of poor quality.

    A guy who couldn't afford a '52 or '62 reissue could buy an import Squier that looked similar for a fraction of the price. For around $300 vs $1200-$1500 for MIA Fenders they were a bargain because they have always been well built practical basic guitars and basses and buyers must have agreed because they've sold a lot of them over the years.

    Sure they skimped a bit on components and hardware to hold to a price point but for the more tech oriented of us one could easily upgrade one to near MIA level and still have spent far less than an MIA version. Mine have been and they suit my needs quite well. But the reality is no one had to do that in order to own a very good instrument as is.

    I'm one whose sad to see them go away but it's pretty obvious Fender is hoping now ten years hence to up sell Squier CV owners and buyer to their various MIM Series including the new Ventera Series leaving the relabeled Vintage Modified "Classic Vibes" as their top entry level line. IMHO that should only help increase the value of the original MIC Classic Vibes in the used marketplace.
     
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  5. Tezuka27

    Tezuka27 Tele-Holic

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    I scraped my 2010 CV50s butterscotch down to bare wood (that took a lot of work to get through the undercoat), including the neck and refinished the body in Shell Pink Nitro, and redid the neck in Nitro, also. I added a top binding, upgraded to Gotoh tuners, upgraded the electronics and added a Bigsby B5. I like it a LOT.

    jb
     
  6. nicod98

    nicod98 Tele-Afflicted

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    That's why I'm such a big fan of blind tests... So for me the Squier logo is NOT a negative, but a positive... I have enough confidence in this guitar, and I dare you to challenge it.



    I agree and disagree at the same time. This is the era of CNC-produced guitars, but why are there some budget brands that f**** up the body shape completely? Ever try fitting a Squier or Fender perfect fit pickguard to a Harley Benton?

    You can't beat a good hype... :)

    My whole take on the neck discussion is easy. I have small hands, so I have no problem with Squier necks being thin. I also have fat fingers, so I do have problems with narrow string spacing. Apparently my sweat doesn't affect glossy neck finishes in a "sticky" way, so:
    • most Squier necks fit my hands perfectly
    • only a few, most notably early 2000s Indonesian Standards with a regular nut size but very very narrow string space are completely unplayable.
    • the (Chinese) Classic Vibe is among the more narrow string spaces, but it's just about doable for me
    • I actually don't feel a big difference in thin and thicker neck sizes, probably because I still play in a very "classical" way, holding my thumb at the back of the neck, and not on the E-string. (I need to, else my hand probably wouldn't fit around the neck, and it would make fretting the A-string with my index finger very difficult at least). So the CVC (being among the thinnest necks) fits me perfectly.
    • I like the glossy finish.
    So one of my best loved guitars is the Vintage Modified '72 Thinline. Mine has a wider string spacing than any of my 6 CV teles and I love the pickups better.
     
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  7. TwangerWannabe

    TwangerWannabe Tele-Holic

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    Great minds think alike.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  8. TwangerWannabe

    TwangerWannabe Tele-Holic

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    Yesterday I replaced my CVC neck and noticed a 2017 Serial number and a 2018 date stamped at the heel.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  9. philbeck

    philbeck TDPRI Member

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    I love my CVC skinny neck but have a hell of a time seeing the little off white dots on the side of the neck. I have a 76 Tele with a rosewood neck that has black dots that are not on the rosewood edge and I can see them just fine even at a night time gig. The CVC dots are half on the light part of the neck shoulder and half on the dark part of the fret board shoulder and hard for me to see standing up at a gig. I don't wear glasses except for cheaters to read and they do help but who wants to wear cheaters at a gig.
     
  10. soulman969

    soulman969 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Don't look at the neck. Look out at all the hot women brother. ;)
     
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  11. TheTransient

    TheTransient Tele-Holic

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    I have a 2017 CVC and I am very pleased with the overall quality. Not sure if it was better earlier on, but it certainly wasn't bad in 2017!
     
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  12. horax

    horax Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    if you don't like hte gloss, just sand with 400 and 1500 and you'll get a nice, smooth finish.
    Intheblues did this on youtube hte other day with a 50's BSB
     
  13. Anacharsis

    Anacharsis Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

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    I like the necks on all my MIM and Squier Teles. That said, I really like the roasted neck on my EBMM guitars, so I'll probably replace each of my Tele necks over time with unfinished roasted ones.
     
  14. whoanelly15

    whoanelly15 Tele-Holic

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    Still loving my CVC (more on that later), but I wanted to share this pic of the neck profile side by side with my AV64. I don’t have calipers, but this sure Teles (autocorrected, leaving it) the story with how different these are to play.
    9F3DDDD6-F607-467C-A56D-CA46C9C77EA0.jpeg F9876951-B8AD-453A-B6B7-A931248ECF5A.jpeg
     
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  15. whoanelly15

    whoanelly15 Tele-Holic

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    Not having strings on it probably also makes a difference. YMMV.
     
  16. NicDo

    NicDo TDPRI Member

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    I used to think I needed a big neck until the Classic Vibe.
    Most of my larger neck guitars are gone for other reasons, but my three main Fenders (06 American Deluxe Strat V-Neck, 97 MiM Strat with Classic Player 50's Strat soft V, and my 08 MiM Standard Tele) are not thin and always feel great.

    Got a new (China, May 2019 inspected date, 2018 serial number) Classic Vibe 50's Tele in Vintage Blonde and just love the neck as is. I can tell it's a little thinner, but not while playing. It is super comfortable and I have large hands/long fingers. I was planning to swapping out the neck, but it would be hard to beat this neck unless I had a bunch to choose from. I wish it said Fender, but that says more about me than the guitar.

    FYI, this May 2019 CV came to me via Musicians Friend on their July 4th sale.
    It is the lightest solidbody I've owned, nice grain through the opaque white, and a nicely flamed neck. Very resonant. I've barely picked up my other guitars since getting it. Feel pretty lucky scoring it.

    I tried to buy an older CV 50's just like it this spring, but it was the most misrepresented ad you could imagine.
    Very thick nearly solid finish, super-heavy body, and no flame (plus lots of undisclosed damage).
    Just a complete dog and people say those where the good years!
     
  17. fender4life

    fender4life Friend of Leo's

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    U can't possibly judge them by one example. In fact, the early ones had a lot of very light examples, far more then later years. I remember because when they arrived around 09 i picked up a few in the first year and was surprised at how light they were which was quite a bit lighter than any of the 3 MIM classic series teles i had by that time. I also have one of the heavier ones that's fantastic. I actually prefer it over the MIM classics that i no longer have. Not real heavy, but about 8.3 Lbs. Also THE best built CV of the 6 CV's i have owned. As well built IMO as any fender production guitar i have seen or owned.
     
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  18. NicDo

    NicDo TDPRI Member

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    I know what you're saying and agree (about judging one example), just speaking to the two I personally tried- which in my experience is completely opposite of the what people are usually saying here. I gave it another chance because of the reputation and glad I did, since that older one was just a bad guitar (not because it was older or had less flame/grain).

    Weight isn't a deal breaker for me, just telling people what I got in my 2018/2019 CV, which happened to be in every way an improvement from the older one I personally tried. I specifically called that out since if I'd only listened to the louder voices saying the older ones are just better as a rule, I would have played that older one and never gave a CV another chance.
     
  19. TeleToneTony

    TeleToneTony TDPRI Member

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    Was a shim necessary because the thicker neck (front to back) would change the set up.
     
  20. guitarist232345

    guitarist232345 Tele-Meister

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    It's "classic vibe" - a modern guitar with a classic vibe. The beauty of the CV is that it blends modern and vintage specs. If Leo Fender were alive, it's probably everything he would've wanted given the craftsmanship, affordability and modern specs.

    I actually see quite a few CVs these days on stage
     
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