Classic Must Reads

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by TheGoodTexan, Nov 4, 2019.

  1. black_doug

    black_doug Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,925
    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2004
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Some great lists here. I'm always on the lookout for a good classic. There's a reason they're called classic. I would suggest it's because larger number of people can relate to them.

    Books I go back and enjoy over include some that have been mentioned already.

    Off the top of my head:
    Hemingway's short stories.
    James Joyce, The Dubliners
    Dostoevsky, The Idiot
    Thomas Hardy, Far From The Madding Crowd, & Tess
    Dickens Oliver Twist

    And
    The Lord of the Rings
     
    telestratosonic likes this.
  2. fenderchamp

    fenderchamp Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    1,248
    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2008
    Location:
    omaha
    The bible is about as classic as it gets.

    I really wouldn't ever tell anybody else really what to read but...

    I guess I don't really know if you want to read like old classic novels (English novels or translated ones or whatever like Austin, Tolstoy, Camus..etc.etc.etc )... or like "Great Books" such as you would find on the https://www.sjc.edu/academic-programs/undergraduate/great-books-reading-list which would include some novels as well?


    I find that a lot of the classic "Great Books" to be little more "chewy" and that they require quite a bit more effort to understand, than your typical Stephen King book or whatever.

    That is to say reading Aristotle and Stephen King are somewhat different activities, though in each case it is certainly reading. Reading Jane Austin or Dostoevsky would be a little more like reading Stephen King on the other hand.

    In any case, good luck on your journey, and if you take some time to learn about the kind of books you might like to read before you start picking up titles, it might be worth the time.

    I guess a book I really like in that regard (at least as a pointer to some other good books to read and what they are like) is http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks03/0300031h.html

    I just sent a copy to my granddaughter a month or so ago, I don't think she's read it at all, but my son in law said he has :) He's pretty well read already though.
     
  3. Greggorios

    Greggorios Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    2,526
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2016
    Location:
    Patterson, NY
    Black Elk Speaks-John Neihardt
    The World According To Garp-John Irving (any of his books)
    The Sun Also Rises-Hemingway
    Great Gatsby-Fitzgerald
    The Prince of Tides-Pat Conroy (any of his books)
    Run With The Horsemen - Ferral Sams
    The Illiad and The Odyssey-Homer
     
  4. KWal

    KWal Tele-Meister

    Age:
    52
    Posts:
    226
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2019
    Location:
    Tejas State of Mind
    All good suggestions so far. I must admit though that no book before or since has had the effect on me than the one that i read when I was thirteen years old.

    "The Happy Hooker" by Xaviera Hallander.
    Good googly moogly did that leave an imprint on my young prepubescent self.
     
  5. DLReed

    DLReed TDPRI Member

    Age:
    35
    Posts:
    91
    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2019
    Location:
    New York
    Native son by Richard Wright
    In cold blood by Truman Capote
    Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry
    Dracula by Bram Stoker
     
  6. richiek65

    richiek65 Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    2,429
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2012
    Location:
    Sydney NSW Australia
    It's been listed already, I've bought it but am yet to read it, The Road by Cormac McCarthy. Was listening to a book club type interview with a musician/songwriter who is an avid reader, normally reads a book or two a week. He read The Road and couldn't read another book for eighteen months, it took him that long to get it out of his head. The movie was very watchable, I can tell you that for nothing.
     
  7. Big_Bend

    Big_Bend Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    56
    Posts:
    6,476
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2010
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Hahaha... this quote is used every time Ayn Rand is brought up.. lol you're so witty.. oh man, I haven't heard that one before. Touche..

    Ayn was an intellectual giant compared to the vast majority of her critics... who are reduced to canned retorts that they read on a forum somewhere.
     
  8. DougM

    DougM Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,416
    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2017
    Location:
    Honolulu, HI
    Shakespeare's works are plays, and so are made to be watched, not read. They thrill me when I watch them, but don't when I try to read them.
     
    scrapyardblue and dlew919 like this.
  9. DougM

    DougM Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,416
    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2017
    Location:
    Honolulu, HI
    I've always loved science fiction, so the works of Ray Bradbury are among my favorites.
    I also am quite fond of the Nero Wolfe series of mysteries.
    And all of Dickens works, as well as Orwell and Huxley.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2019
    darkwaters likes this.
  10. modavis99

    modavis99 TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    68
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2010
    Location:
    New Jersey
    The Dirt by Motley Crue.

    also in no particular order ...
    Catch 22
    Slaughterhouse 5
    The Hobbit
    Confederacy of Dunces
    Battle Cry of Freedom
    Animal Farm
     
    Uncle Bob, Moriarty and Archtop Bill like this.
  11. CV Jee Beez

    CV Jee Beez Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    664
    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2016
    Location:
    Duarte, CA
    Ham on Rye - Charles Bukowski
    Animal Farm - George Orwell

    These are the first two that came to mind.
     
  12. Larmo63

    Larmo63 Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,074
    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2018
    Location:
    Timbuktu, Earth
    Slaves In The Family - Edward Ball
    Guns, Steel, and Germs - Jered Diamond
    Life - Keith Richards
    Seabiscuit - Laura Hillenbrand
    Into The Wild - Jon Krakauer
     
    Harry Styron and getbent like this.
  13. Artslap

    Artslap Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    51
    Posts:
    1,078
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2014
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    And:

    Watership Down - Richard Adams
     
    Slim60 and kingofdogs1950 like this.
  14. rolandson

    rolandson Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    761
    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2017
    Location:
    Cascadia
    The Guns Of August; Barbara Tuchman
    Perfectly Reasonable Deviations; Richard Feynman
    Shantaram; Gregory Roberts
    A Brief History Of Time; Stephen Hawking
     
  15. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    51,386
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Location:
    Kelowna, BC, Canuckistan
    I'm not commenting on her message, just her writing level, which is that of bad fan fiction.
     
    Uncle Bob, beyer160 and dlew919 like this.
  16. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    51,386
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Location:
    Kelowna, BC, Canuckistan
    I haven't cracked that book but something tells me TheGoodTexan has a certain acquaintance with it. ;)
     
    TheGoodTexan likes this.
  17. trapdoor2

    trapdoor2 Tele-Afflicted Gold Supporter

    Age:
    62
    Posts:
    1,278
    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2018
    Location:
    Nawth Alabama
    Tolkien.
    Both of the C.S.s (Lewis and Forester)
    P. O'Brian's Aubrey-Maturin series.
    Twain...although I couldn't make it through "Innocents Abroad"
    A.C.Doyle's Holmes stories
    H.G.Wells
    Dickens
    Zane Grey
    E.R.Burroughs' Barsoom series
    Mitchner (I liked "Centennial", mom wouldn't let me read "Hawaii" and then when I did, I thought, "meh".)

    As an English major (until I decided I'd starve to death with that degree), I had to read a lot of stuff I disliked. Kafka, Vonnegut, Dostoevsky, Salinger, etc. Just not my cuppa. I read for entertainment, not enlightenment.

    I do agree that a little A.A. Milne is good for the soul. I especially enjoy the two books of poems, "When We Were Very Young" and "Now We Are Six"...and have the copies which were read to us as children.

    Somehow I found the poetry of Alexander Pope to be a good match for me. I never really enjoyed reading Shakespeare...but like them as plays. I had a good time reading The Canterbury Tales.

    Somebody mentioned the OED as a good read...I concur. I also enjoyed Winchester's "The Professor and the Madman". I watched the movie just the other day...surprisingly decent performance from Mel Gibson.
     
  18. Archtop Bill

    Archtop Bill Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    464
    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2015
    Location:
    Asheville, The Paris of the South
    Captains Courageous by Rudyard Kipling (the film is completely different)
    The Four Feathers by A. E. W. Mason (the film adaptations are good, but don’t come close to the book)
    Slaughter House Five by Kurt Vonnegut (the film, especially considering the era, is surprisingly close to the book)
    The Killer Angels by Michael Shaara (The movie Gettysburg is an excellent adaptation though missing some details despite an incredibly long running time)
    A River Runs Through It and Other Short Stories by Norman McLean (if you love the film, you HAVE to read the book)
    Keys to the Kingdom by A. J. Cronin (good film with a young Gregory Peck, the book will blow you away)

    Finally,

    A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson. The book deals with two guys in their 40’s attempting to walk the Appalachian Trail. The films deals with two guys in their 70’s attempting to walk the Appalachian Trail. It took the film a while to grow on me. Both deal with quitting without giving up and alcoholism.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2019
    catdaddy likes this.
  19. Big_Bend

    Big_Bend Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    56
    Posts:
    6,476
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2010
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Again, this is a thread for people to post about books they like, it is NOT a thread to offer snarky reviews or condescending commentary... but I have come to expect nothing less from Ayn Rand critics. with their extremely limited intellectual capacity to contribute in a respectful way with discussions like these.

    Cheers
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2019
  20. mark53

    mark53 TDPRI Member

    Age:
    67
    Posts:
    55
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2006
    Location:
    the bronx
    Great list especially Son of the Morning Star!
     
    Harry Styron likes this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.