Classic Metallic finishes vs Modern Metallic Finishes

phangtonpower

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I was wondering if there is a difference in the way it's sprayed on. A lot of people recommend dusting on nitro metallics like lake placid blue, but what about newer metallic nitro paints. I have a nitro metal flake transparent blue I'm going to be using.

Do you still have to dust it on?

Maybe the flake is a lot smaller?

I've never used metallics before so I don't know the best way going about it.

The guy in this video doesn't dust it on and seems to get good even coverage minimizing orange peel in at the end.

I've seen a few other car videos where they don't dust on also.
 

Buckocaster51

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345 pages is a lot to go through o_O

Yup it is...especially since metallics are never really dealt with. I just do heavy (0.015" hexagonal flake.) I think you are looking for advice on how to do regular old metallic paint.

The last metallic I shot was with single-stage acrylic lacquer. I have never tried it with basecoast/clearcoat.

Can't give you much advice...other than to AVOID RUNS!

:)
 

phangtonpower

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Yup it is...especially since metallics are never really dealt with. I just do heavy (0.015" hexagonal flake.) I think you are looking for advice on how to do regular old metallic paint.

The last metallic I shot was with single-stage acrylic lacquer. I have never tried it with basecoast/clearcoat.

Can't give you much advice...other than to AVOID RUNS!

:)

I've painted many things with rattle cans and airbrush, so I have my technique down I think. I usually do very light passes and coats. I also understand dusting, but what I've read recommended on reranch is anywhere from 2 feet to an 4 feet. That just seems a little to extreme to me. That's why I'm a little confused.
 

PixMix

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Run a few tests to see how the actual paint that you have works.

But generally, the idea is to spray consistently even coats of metallic paint, and in the process have the small metal particles set down on the surface at different angles and positions. This is easier done if the coats are sprayed kind of dry, misted or "dusted". Heavy coats (where little puddles of lacquer form) make suspended metal particles settle at the bottom of the puddle, and then you get an uneven appearance from one area to the other.

This is not an issue with non-metallic opaque colors, because there's no suspended material in there, and therefore if you spray slightly uneven coats, sanding fixes that.
 

Rano Bass

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I don't know where that "dusting" idea came from.....I never do it, sometimes just for the last "control" coat but never to build colors with metallics or pearls.
 

Peltogyne

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There is a lot of superstition and myth with anything to do with guitars. I've read thousands of posts here and have seen how some of these build. One of the funnier ones to me is you have to soak sandpaper for 24 hours before using it.

Any ways, here is a Duplicolor Metalflecks paint job I did. I used all wet coats sprayed 4 to 6 inches or so from the surface moving the can rather quickly. I read about people using many cans of paint on a single body as they try to follow all the myths.


body-2.jpeg
 

PaulieBoy

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There is a lot of superstition and myth with anything to do with guitars. I've read thousands of posts here and have seen how some of these build. One of the funnier ones to me is you have to soak sandpaper for 24 hours before using it.

Any ways, here is a Duplicolor Metalflecks paint job I did. I used all wet coats sprayed 4 to 6 inches or so from the surface moving the can rather quickly. I read about people using many cans of paint on a single body as they try to follow all the myths.


View attachment 350731
WICKED!
 

phangtonpower

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There is a lot of superstition and myth with anything to do with guitars. I've read thousands of posts here and have seen how some of these build. One of the funnier ones to me is you have to soak sandpaper for 24 hours before using it.

Any ways, here is a Duplicolor Metalflecks paint job I did. I used all wet coats sprayed 4 to 6 inches or so from the surface moving the can rather quickly. I read about people using many cans of paint on a single body as they try to follow all the myths.


View attachment 350731

What about your clear. Did you do a few light coats first?

Nice Jazz by the way!!
 

PixMix

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There is a lot of superstition and myth with anything to do with guitars. I've read thousands of posts here and have seen how some of these build. One of the funnier ones to me is you have to soak sandpaper for 24 hours before using it.

Any ways, here is a Duplicolor Metalflecks paint job I did. I used all wet coats sprayed 4 to 6 inches or so from the surface moving the can rather quickly. I read about people using many cans of paint on a single body as they try to follow all the myths.


View attachment 350731


Looks great. Why did you move the can rather quickly?
 

Peltogyne

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Instead of the usual foot or so away I hold the can much closer which requires faster movement so I don't get runs. It's a bit trickier but uses a fraction of the paint.
 

PixMix

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So it's the same thing: you want as little sprayed at a time as possible; you make more passes with less paint sprayed per pass, rather than fewer heavy "wet" passes. I think the OP's use of the term "dusting" has us confused a bit. We're all talking about the same thing.
 

Peltogyne

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No, not the same at all. Dusting is when the paint lands with very little solvents in it because it is sprayed super thin and from a distance. It is closer to dry with the concept that it will not react with previous layers as much. I am doing wet coats but instead of being a foot or so away I get very close and move fast. This leaves a normal amount of paint but greatly reduces over spray and waste and requires the hand skills of a world champion juggler. The Jazz bass above was painted with a single can including doing the headstock twice. I am not trying to do as little as possible, and have full coverage within 3 coats.
 
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PixMix

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Single can here too, more like 3/4 of it actually, including the painted headstock, but just a slightly different application, pretty much same materials as yours: duplicolor metallic + minwax clear coat. I'm not a world champion juggler, but it would be a useful contribution to the pool of guitar related myths and legends if I pretended I was one. Btw, I understand very well what you're saying and why you're doing things the way you're doing. :)

But hey, as long as we see the world around us reflecting on the guitar, it's all good.







This one even comes with chandelier:





 

kmcanney

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Single can here too, more like 3/4 of it actually, including the painted headstock, but just a slightly different application, pretty much same materials as yours: duplicolor metallic + minwax clear coat. I'm not a world champion juggler, but it would be a useful contribution to the pool of guitar related myths and legends if I pretended I was one. Btw, I understand very well what you're saying and why you're doing things the way you're doing. :)

But hey, as long as we see the world around us reflecting on the guitar, it's all good.

That looks fantastic with the tortoise. What is the name of the color?
 

PixMix

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That looks fantastic with the tortoise. What is the name of the color?

Medium Wedgwood Metallic is the name of color used on the Jazzmaster. I don't remember the name color of the one on the tele, but I might have saved the can. I will look tomorrow for it.
 

kmcanney

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Thank you, PixMix! It's the Jazzmaster that really caught my eye. On my phone, I thought the Tele was the same color.

Nice work--it's gorgeous.
 

nick0

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There is a lot of superstition and myth with anything to do with guitars. I've read thousands of posts here and have seen how some of these build. One of the funnier ones to me is you have to soak sandpaper for 24 hours before using it.

Any ways, here is a Duplicolor Metalflecks paint job I did. I used all wet coats sprayed 4 to 6 inches or so from the surface moving the can rather quickly. I read about people using many cans of paint on a single body as they try to follow all the myths.


View attachment 350731
That is one beautiful bass. :D
 




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