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Chord Construction for Beginners

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by garytelecastor, Dec 23, 2016.

  1. garytelecastor

    garytelecastor Poster Extraordinaire

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    In the first grade in school we all learned the Do-Re-Mi scale, and I bet there isn't a person on this site that cannot sing it from memory. Well the purpose of learning this scale was to provide us rug rats with a basic instruction to tone and melody.
    The neatest thing about this scale is that it is fundamentally the cornerstone of Western music.
    We all know it, now lets sing it together: Do-Re-Mi-Fa-Sol-La-Ti-Do ad infinitum.

    When we begin to learn the "anatomy" of music this scale becomes very important.
    Western music began as single line melodys with all singing in unison. But they used the Western Tonal Scale, out of which comes the Do-Re-Mi or Major Scale.
    Keep in mind that there is a difference between these two scales. The Western Tonal Scale contains all of the flats/sharps and whole tones of the musical alphabet:
    (For this post we will use the key of C, but remember that the material presented here can be used in any key.)

    Western Tonal Scale:

    C - (C# or Db) - D - (D# or Eb) - E - F - (F# or Gb) - G - (G# or Ab) - A - (A# or Bb) - B - C

    The notes with the parenthesis around them are the same in tone, but they are named differently depending on the key you are playing in at the moment. They are referred to in music as
    Enharmonics - Which basically means same tone, different name.

    The Major Scale is taken "out of" the Western Tonal Scale and it contains 7 notes and follows a given structure.
    For our future purposes we will refer to the movement from one note to the next note in the scale as either a "1/2 step, or 1 step". On the guitar movement up or down the neck one fret is a 1/2 step. Movement on the neck up or down 2 frets is a whole step or 1 step.

    In the key of C, the C major scale contains the notes:

    C - D - E - F - G - A - B - C

    This is the entire Major scale in C and is constructed in the following way.

    C (one step) D (one step) E (1/2 step) F (one step) G (one step) A (one step) B (1/2 step) C

    So if a whole step or one step = movement of 2 frets
    And if a 1/2 step = movement of 1 fret
    The construction of the Major scale on any note of the guitar will follow this pattern:

    whole step - whole step - 1/2 step - whole step - whole step - whole step - 1/2 step
    OR
    step - step - 1/2 step - step - step - step - 1/2 step

    MEMORIZE THIS PATTERN. YOU HAVE JUST LEARNED THE BASIS OF WESTERN MUSIC.


    So around the time Bach came along he played organ in Rome mostly in churches. He discovered that certain tones in the Major Scale sound well when played together. And he began to write what is commonly termed S - A - T - B music.
    S = Soprano
    A = Alto
    T = Tenor
    B = Bass


    As time progressed there were certain rules that were developed for the proper use of these voices in 4 part harmony. For the purposes here we will stick at first to 3 part harmony.

    By combining the 1st note of the major scale with the 3rd note of the major scale, and the 5th note of the major scale we are able to construct a Major chord. But first we have to number the notes in the scales according to their position. It couldn't be more simple:

    C D E F G A B C
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 or 1


    That's it. Every major scale in every key follows this pattern. The numbers not only apply to the notes but to the chords too.

    So by taking the 1, 3, 5 (thank you, Johann) we can construct the C Maj Chord.

    C E G
    1 3 5

    By applying the "Major Scale Pattern" to the Western tonal scale we start with the F note

    F G A Bb C D E F
    step step 1/2 step step step 1/2

    F G A Bb C D E F
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 or 1

    1 3 5
    F A C

    Note that this scale is built on the F note which is the 4 note of the C Major Scale.
    Thus the 4 chord is built as above.

    Now let's go to the 5 chord

    The 5th note of the C Major Scale is a G

    Again, by finding the G on the Western Tonal Scale and using the step pattern we can
    construct the G Major Scale:

    G A B C D E F# G
    step step 1/2 step step step 1/2

    Numbering:
    G A B C D E F G
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 or 1

    G B D
    1 3 5


    I am sure that some of you are wondering how they came up with the formulas
    for these scales. Well, it takes a while to explain, but be confident that it is based
    on physics and mainly frequency in Hz. I still don't understand all of it.

    I know that right now you might find some of this challenging. This is all part of learning.
    Don't believe that there isn't a player on this site or on the planet that didn't start by
    having to torture themselves through this material. But if you are going to be a proficient
    player it is necessary. Just keep in mind that first time with a group of guys/gals that you
    haven't played with before and they say, "It's a 1,4, 5 progression in F." And you will be able
    to kick butt.

    Again, ANY Questions post them here and I will get right back to you.
    The next post will be on the construction of different "flavors" of chords (i.e., major, minor,
    seventh, etc.).
    For right now PRACTICE THIS FOR ABOUT 10 minutes a time per day and it will come.
    Why 10 minutes? New neurological evidence shows that rather than sitting and playing
    your guitar for 60 minutes straight, 6 intervals of 10 minutes or less are much more
    profitable to your muscle memory. Fatigue begins to set in after about 10 min.

    To begin, here are some major scale patterns that are useful on the neck.

    f-------g-------a-------b---c
    C Major
    Fret 1---2---3--4---5 6 7 8 9 (r = root or 1)

    str
    6----x-------5-------x

    5-------x----r--------x

    4-------3----x-------5

    3-------x--------x---r

    2----r-------x-------3

    1----x-------5-------x


    -----f--------g--------a-------b---c--------d--------e
    -----1---2----3---4---5---6---7---8---9---10--11---12

    6----------------------------------r--------x---------3

    5----------------------------------x--------5---------x

    4----------------------------------x----r-------------x

    3----------------------------------3----x------------5

    2--------------------------------------------x--------x

    1----------------------------------r---------x--------3
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2016
  2. callasabra

    callasabra Tele-Afflicted

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    Thank you. You have stated This very well. Wish I had this 20 years ago. You also confirmed my suspicion of the 1,4,5 thing.

    What scale would you use to solo over your 1,4,5 progression? And can you expound upon the 4 part harmony?
     
  3. garytelecastor

    garytelecastor Poster Extraordinaire

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    Thanks for your response callasabra. I have found that when you think of the notes of the chords and not just the structure you can come up with some interesting lines.
    In SATB harmony there are several rules when it comes to writing with it. For instance it is largely an accepted rule that you almost never double the 3rd in the harmonies.
    So let's take an example. We'll stay in the Key of C major and work out a simple melody that we all know. Please try to understand that I don't have musical notation software available right now, so I will do the best I can to show it here using what I have. Let's take the first line from the old song by Hank Williams Sr. "I can't help it if I'm still in love with you". We are in 4/4 time, 4 beats to a measure and we'll just expand the harmony to adapt to the melody line. Everything in the first line are quarter notes. 1 beat or 2 (1/2) beats per note
    The Melody of the lyric "Today I passed you on the street" is in the Soprano voice. The Alto, Tenor, and Bass lines are adding backing harmony.







    -------------------|-------------------------------F
    | x |
    -------|----x---------|----------x------|----------D
    x x o
    ---------------------------------------------------B
    | |
    ---x-----------------------x-----------------------G

    ---------------------------------------------------E

    So a few rules to begin. This is going to seem a little complex to begin with, but remember that most of this is very relevant to classical and Jazz. Also, keep in mind that this is 4 part harmony. For right now there are only 3 tones in each chord, so to make 4 part harmony in one of the voices we will double one of the tones.
    1. Very seldom double the 3rd or 7th tone. Both of these are very stong identifying personality tones in harmony. Some of this gets into what I am going to write about next, but these two notes in major scale are altered to produce the min chords, and the 7th tone is used in the 7th chord, the min 7th, b7b5 chords, etc. If you put two or more of these in the same piece of harmony they can really cause the interworking lines to clash.
    2. You can double the 5th and the root, but even these have their own rules to write by. We are going to talk about a concept called Inversion here. Inversion is the names given to stacking-in this case-the 1st, 3rd, and 5th of the chord. If on a piano you play the C Maj chord with the 3 notes as the chord is built-1*3*5-the first note of the chord is the 1 and as we talked about earlier this is referred to as the Root position. If we build the chord as 3*5*1 this is called the 1st Inversion. If we build the chord with starting with the 5th this is called the 2nd Inversion.
    In each of these positions Inversions there is a given order to the harmony.
    A.) In root position you can double the 1st or the 5th tone.
    B.) In 1st Inversion you can double any of the 3 tones, but remember the caution about using the 3rd carefully.
    C.) In 2nd Inversion you only want to double the 5th tone.

    So let's look at the melody:
    The first quarter note is a "g". The "g" note fits into two chords of our progression. It is the 5th tone of the CMaj chord, and it is the root tone of the G Maj chord. Since the song is in the key of C it is safe to assume that the "g" note is functioning in the role of the 5th note of the CMaj (or CM) chord. So if we are to put in harmonies to this tone buildiing with the CM chord then we will be using as our other two tones the "e" and the "c". So let's do that:
    First in which voice do we want the melody. Well this, again, is at the discretion of the writer. For our purposes we will use the Soprano or S voice for the melody and harmonize the Alto or A; Tenor or T; and Bass or B.
    In order to keep things pleasing to the ear we don't want to be writing each voice all over the pitch schematic. So we will try to keep our voices harmonies in a fairly tight pitch pattern. So let's go:
    C C G C F G
    --------------------------------------------------------F
    E
    -----------------D-----------------------D-------------D
    C C C

    -----------------------------------------B--------------B

    S-----G----------------G---------G------------G--------G

    F F F
    A-----E----E----------------------------------------E---------E
    D
    T --C--- C-- ----- --C------------------------C-------C
    B B B
    ----------------------------A----------------------------A
    B G G G G G

    ---------------------------------F---------------------------------F

    ----------------------------------------------------------D

    ----------------------------------------------------------B
    Chords = C C G7 C F G G7 C
    Soprano = G-C--D-E-C-G-D-C
    Alto = E-E--F-G-F-D-B-G
    Tenor = C-C--B-C-A-B-F-E
    Bass = G-G--G-G-F-G-B-C

    If you noticed, I added the 7th tone in two of the places the G
    chord is found as a way to accent the tonal change from the F
    to the E, a 1/2 step melodically.

    1st chord in the song is a CM in 2nd inversion
    2nd chord is the same thing CM in 2nd Inversion
    3rd chord is called the 3rd Inversion
    4th chord 2nd inversion
    5th chord root position
    6th chord root position
    7th chord 3rd inversion
    8th chord root position

    Note how the melody begins on the 5th of the CM chord and ends on the root of the CM chord. Also note the choice of harmony notes for the 4 different voices.

    There are a ton of rules to all of this, but this is not a music theory class, and just recognizing the 3 basic rules above will serve best. Remember the diminished chord is the only chord where you are allowed to double the 3rds.

    This is what I am going to leave you with for today about the SATB harmony system created by Bach.

    As far as the best scale to play over the 3 chord changes. I use the blues scale alot with a maj 3 and a maj 7 thrown in.

    To build this scale follow this in pattern 1 & 2. The note on the 6th string is the key used to play.
    For instance: if you are in the key of A you want to start the scale out on the 5th fret of the 6th string. The same notes in Pattern 2. Only in pattern two you start the scale on the same note as the 5th fret on the 5th string, only starting on the 6th string. So in the key of A the 5th note on the 5th string is a D. Find the D (which is the 10th fret) on the 6th string and play pattern 2. I will write these in the C patterns:

    --------Frets
    Strings---8---9---10---11--12--13--14---15

    6---------r-------------x

    5---------x---x----x

    4---------x--------r

    3---------x----x---x----x---x

    2---------x-------------x---x----x

    1---------x-------------x---x----r



    ----1---2---3---4---5--6---7---8---
    6---x---x---x

    5---x-------x

    4---x-------x----x----x

    3-----------x---------x

    2---x-------------x------x---x---x

    1---x---x---x------------x---x---x


    These two patterns work on as with the major patterns.
    about 2-610 min sessions per day.
    I will answer your question tomorrow about how to use these over
    the changes in a 1, 4, 5.

    I don't want to throw too much out there at one time. Get's overwhelming.
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2016
  4. screamin eagle

    screamin eagle Poster Extraordinaire

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    This is all really great info, but I want to add one simple thing. Something that I don't think Gary left out, but something that someone reading this might wonder about. Because I did when I first learned all this.


    The basis and rules for chord construction aren't the same as chord progression construction. Don't confuse the two.

    When building a chord progression you will follow some different rules, yet these rules still apply to the chords that make up the progression. If that makes sense.
    Carry on.
     
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  5. callasabra

    callasabra Tele-Afflicted

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    Thanks Gary. I am still not understanding how the 4part harmony applies to the guitar but I will keep trying.

    Do you care to entertain a different approach? Take the intro to fade to black by Metallica. Real simple rhythm progression based around B minor chord. What are the important things that link the lead to the rhythm? Is it that the lead starts on the B note as the rhythm starts on the B chord, the both implement the F sharp note, then as the rhythm moves to the A note the lead does as well, and so on throughout the B minor scale?

    Also the patterns don't appear to retain the formating, at least on my tablet. Are these familiar scales or patterns?

    I do appreciate your time and help.
     
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  6. Leon Grizzard

    Leon Grizzard Friend of Leo's

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    I bet that if you copy one of the musical examples and pastedl it into a word processing program using an evenly spaced font like Courier or Courier New, and decrease the font size, it will line up right.
     
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  7. callasabra

    callasabra Tele-Afflicted

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    I will try that. Thanks
     
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  8. screamin eagle

    screamin eagle Poster Extraordinaire

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    It could be said that a four note chord is four part harmony. And a 3 note chord is 3 note harmony.
     
  9. garytelecastor

    garytelecastor Poster Extraordinaire

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    My reason for including the SATB portion was to provide a basis for the justification of the way chords are constructed today. It really has nothing to do with practical application for the guitar, as it were, unless you include classical. The simple fact is that today we follow the same pattern for chord construction that Bach invented. We use the 1, 3, 5, 7. 9, 11, 13 in that order to construct any chord in Western music vocabulary. I thought you were interested in the foundations of harmony and the rules that Bach and others after him made clear for musical tonality. So I am sorry for the mix up. I think I wrote it before, but the rules and 4 part harmonies are based mainly in Classical music and Jazz. That is why I used the example of Freddy Greene with the CBO. He and the entire rhythm section he played with, understood how this worked when in a multi-instrumental setting. A lot of times he used mainly one note lines to harmonize with the bassist, and he would use simple 2 note and 3 note chords to lay down his rhythm playing. When you have a band that contains sometime 4 trumpets, 4 trombones, and 4-6 sax, keys, drums, bass, harp, guitar, and sometimes vocal, he knew that his role was to keep the bottom end of the rhythm tight. If he was using full chords with full construction, he would end up walking all over the horns and other instruments in the band. It is the same in an Orchestra. Sometimes you can have up to 70 instruments in the group, and the end result is to make the music as palatable to the ear as possible. If everyone is playing full boar, full parts all the time, it becomes cacophony. The purpose of this particular post is to help people who have never had the chance to really learn or understand how harmony and chord construction can be used as a tool for personal expression of creativity.

    I am so sorry for the way the information posted. I don't have a current program that I can run for musical notation so I tried to make it on the site, and it didn't turn out. Please, forgive me.


    -------------------|-------------------------------F
    ------------------x--------------------------------
    -------|----x---------|----------x------|----------D
    ------x----------------x---------------- o---------
    ---------------------------------------------------B
    -----------------------------------------------------
    ---x-----------------------x-----------------------G
    -----------------------------------------------------
    ---------------------------------------------------E





    ----C--C---------G7---C---F----G---------G7-------C---Chords



    -----------------------------------------------------------------F

    ------------------------E--------------------------------------

    -------------------D-----------------------D--------------------D

    ----------C-----------------C---------------------C-

    -----------------------------------------------------------------B

    ----------------------------------------------------------------

    S.)---G----------------G----------G---------------G-------------G

    -------------------F----------F-----------------F----------------------
    A)---E----E---------------------------------------------E------------E

    -----------------------------------D----------------------------

    T.)---C---C-----------C---------------------------C-------Middle C

    -------------------B---------------B--------B--------------

    ------------------------------A---------------------------------A

    B)---G--- G---------G----G-----------G--------G--------------------

    ------------------------------F---------------------------------F

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    -----------------------------------------------------------------D


    Please bear with me. It isn't perfect, but it's 6:40am. :)
    As I said I don’t have the right software right now to put this

    in musical notation. The Bass voice and the Alto voice

    are in italics. The Tenor voice and the Soprano (or in this case

    melodic) voice are in Bold.

    The names of the note lines are on the left side

    The chords are all one beat a piece.

    I did this when I was very tired and I broke a couple of the rules







     
    Last edited: Dec 25, 2016
  10. garytelecastor

    garytelecastor Poster Extraordinaire

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    I would most certainly think so. Thanks for pointing that out.
     
  11. garytelecastor

    garytelecastor Poster Extraordinaire

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    Fade to black intro is a prime example of this stuff in practice. The rhythm part is playing over a Bm to A change right at the start of the piece.
    The single signature licks are using the notes respectively
    of B-F#-G-F#B-F#-D-F#-A-F#-G-F#-A-F#-D-F#-B-F#-G-F#-B-F#-D-F#-C#-E-A-E-C#-E-A-A
    So the lick is playing the 1, and the 5 of Bm with a G note in role of dissonance using, as we talked about originally, the 1/2 step change.
    Then he goes down to the A chord and he is playing the 1 and the 6 of A Major with the b7th (g) tone of the scale. Then he changes to a C# which is the 3rd of the A chord to the E which is the 5 of the A.
    This is the whole idea of using the tonality of the chord and the harmony there in to do the work for you. The way that Metallica does this all the time gives me chills. They really are expert at using the 3 and 7 to make some interesting lines.
    To answer your assertion. Yes, this is not in practice 4 part SATB, but it is Bach harmonies in practice. Bach is the one that came up with the 1,3,5 of the scale and there inherent property of acting as a catalyst to other ideas.
    So yeah, all the way through the signature licks he is using primarily the chord tones or arppegios of the chords to create a very fascinating, haunting, and mysterious intro. Kind of plays into the whole death theme of Metallica. :)

    Now one of the things that Hammett is doing here too is that in reality he is laying a D chord over an A change in the first part of the change. He plays a D-F#-A. Bm is the 6 chord of the DMajor scale. So is the song in the key of Bm or is it really in the key of D. This is where the whole idea of playing with dissonance and using this knowledge comes in handy. Especially when writing. If I were playing a lead over these changes I think I would be tempted to play in D Maj and not in Bm. Hammett uses the F#-G (1/2 step) change and he uses the D-C# (1/2 step) change. If you listen to Enter Sandman he uses a tritone and the 1/2 step changes alot. They really are powerful and that's why when you are using almost anything in a 2 part or voice harmony (or more voices) you want to be careful what you are doing with them.

    (One quick question: Did the changes I made stay in the right format now? Did you get the two scales I sent?)
     
    Last edited: Dec 25, 2016
  12. garytelecastor

    garytelecastor Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'm glad you pointed that out. Everything changes (kind of) when a person gets into changes over the melody doesn't it? I hadn't thought of that. But yeah, you start getting in Altered chords etc. Like moving from the 1 chord to the bVII chord. A person isn't really playing a bVII they are playing the
    IV/IV if it is a major chord. And then there are all those things like proper use of dim and aug chords etc.
    I don't know about you, but to me music is a real paradox. It is mathematical in it's stucture and math has a solid "follow the rules" kind of basis, and yet there is the whole creative thing which really is worthless with rules. I think that may be one of the reasons I like it so much. It's spiritual and material at the same time. Like Light.
     
  13. garytelecastor

    garytelecastor Poster Extraordinaire

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    I know that this may seem a little advanced but you really need to eat, drink and breathe this video.
    When we get to modes it will seem like a snap to you and everyone who watches this.

    EVERYONE NEEDS TO WATCH THIS VIDEO AND WATCH THIS VIDEO AND WATCH THIS VIDEO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

     
  14. callasabra

    callasabra Tele-Afflicted

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    Thanks for you help and time. The SATB makes more sense as a history lesson than how I initially viewed it. I will work on the scales and the video. Thanks again, and I will be reading these posts over and over.
     
  15. Sooper8

    Sooper8 Tele-Holic

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    Garytelecastor (and others), thank you so much for your time and effort putting this down so clearly here.
    I really appreciate its when members here share their knowledge , but not only that, it's the time it must take. You write very very concisely. A great skill in itself.
    Thank you
     
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  16. callasabra

    callasabra Tele-Afflicted

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    Question regarding your caution about the 3rd tone. in a C major barre chord at the 8th fret for example, there are the following "tones"

    String 6 - C - root
    String 5 - G - fifth tone
    String 4 - C - root octave tone
    String 3 - E - third tone
    String 2 - G - fifth octave tone
    String 1 - C - second root octave tone.

    (Confession, I really don't know proper terminology so I am "creating" some of this, which makes me guilty of my biggest complaint regarding this stuff (inconsistent/inaccurate nomenclature). if "root octave tone or fifth octave tone" has some other meaning I apologize for creating confusion.)

    In the barre chord, the third tone only appears once. Is this an example of your caution? Or is it chord progression specific within a 4 chord progression and the caution is to not introduce the E chord (3rd tone) more than once?

    So, for example.

    Ok: (1chord) C, (3chord) E, (4chord) F, (5chord) G,
    Not Ok: (1chord) C, (3chord) E, (4chord) F, (3chord) E,

    Luckily I am familiar with the modes, but his application of them is new to me.

    One final question for today, when you write "bVII chord" does this mean flat the 7th chord, for example in C major the "bVII chord" would be a Bflat chord. if not, what does this mean?

    I copied and pasted the changes into MSWord with a different font and it worked out. Thanks.
     
  17. screamin eagle

    screamin eagle Poster Extraordinaire

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    This is the E structure chord form. The chord tones you called out are true no matter the root chord--3rd, 5th, tonic etc.


    That chord form only has the 3rd in it once, but other chord forms may have it in more than once (if you choose to finger all the strings--which you don't have to). The C structure chord form could have two 3rds in it (again, if you choose to fret both of the 3rds).



    Yes. The 7th in the major scale of C is The B note. The bVII is what is referred to as the dominant 7th and the major 7th is the 7th.
     
  18. garytelecastor

    garytelecastor Poster Extraordinaire

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    I was afraid this was going to happen. I should have never mentioned the SATB stuff. Mainly it was just to explain where the current structure of harmony comes from. If a person is going to be a true musician they need to throw out the rules.
    Yeah, learn how they are constructed, then let your creativity take over. I have a couple of videos here I would wish that everyone here would watch. Like everyone else, I have my "crushes" on certain bands that last a while. Right now it is Lady Antebellum. Mainly because Dave Haywood, the guy that does most of their musical arrangements and lyrics is, IMHO, a freakin' genius when it comes to simplicity. He does almost all of the guitar and keys work on their stuff in the studio.
    Watch these next two videos. They are both the same song, but one is played by Haywood himself, and the other is played by a kid and they both are spot on to the studio tracks. The lines are simple, elegant, and unbelievably beautiful. This song has been covered by a "hundred" popular artists and singers and it is due to the fact that it is so subtle.






    If you caught it the song is basically F and Am; C and Em. He really uses the idea of the half step and playing off the 3rd exceptionally well in this song.

    Yes, when I was writing about the bVII chord I was talking about the flatted root of the VII. So in C the VII is the Bdim chord; the bVII chord is BbM. Now in notation, the VII contains the notes B, D, F, A which is a diminished chord. The bVII contains the Bb D F. There is also a half/diminished which contains the notes B, D, F#, A and I think you probably notice that this is DM chord with a B in the bass.
    So if you have been covering modes then you could play a B Locrian over the BDim, but you could play a D Ionian with the 1/2 diminished. Or you could also play a B Aeolian. And according to everything off the mode video, the rest of the modes could be played in their respective positions to the Aeolian.
    So if the
    Aeolian root note is the B

    Locrian root note is the C#
    Ionian root note is the D
    Dorian root note is the E
    Phyrgian root note is the F#
    Lydian root note is the G
    Mixolydian note is the A

    Now, if you follow this pattern and are aware of the structure of the 7 different mode scales on the neck, you can play out of all 7 modes and in actuality you are playing in B Aeolian, regardless of the scale shape. Does that make sense?

    You have the nomenclature perfect. Just remember we call the chords by the numerical position within the scale.

    C-Root, and #1 note-Also the root of the C-E-G,-which makes #1Chord
    D-2nd tone-Root tone of the Dm chord-which makes the #2 chord
    E-3rd tone-Root of the Em chord-which is the 3 chord
    F-4th tone-Root of the FM chord-which is the 4 chord
    G-5th tone-Root of the GM chord-which is the 5 chord
    A-6th tone-Root of the Am chord-which is the 6 chord
    B-7th tone-Root of the Bdim chord-which is the 7 chord

    So speaking in notes it's the "1, 3, 5"; speaking in the 3 chord progression we use here it's the "1, 4, 5".

    I really don't know if this is helping or if all I am doing is confusing people. We're starting to get a little deep here, way deeper than I had intended so I am going to start the 2nd thread.
     
  19. callasabra

    callasabra Tele-Afflicted

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    "That chord form only has the 3rd in it once, but other chord forms may have it in more than once (if you choose to finger all the strings--which you don't have to). The C structure chord form could have two 3rds in it (again, if you choose to fret both of the 3rds)."

    So if I played a C chord in the first position and played all six strings as such

    String 6 - E - third tone
    String 5 - C - root tone
    String 4 - E - third octave tone
    String 3 - G - fifth tone
    String 2 - C - root octave tone
    String 1 - E - second third octave tone

    the SATB info is helpful. I have to understand every part of something and how it relates to every other part of that something. (like the importance of left-handed screw threads and when to employ them).

    While I REALLY don't like Lady Antebellum, I do see what you mean about Haywood and I too am impressed with his "genius when it comes to simplicity." I will spend some time with the vids.

    Yes.
    I learned these modes 15 years ago, and while it helped me "map" the fretboard, I didn't understand how to really employ them. Now, with this thread, and some other reading, I am really beginning to see how this works.

    Assuming the "Em" is E minor and "FM" is F major chords, how do you know when to use major, minor and diminished chords?

    And so, the 1, 4, 5, progression here would be C major, F major, G major.
    And the 1, 3, 5, notes of each chord would be C E G, F A C, G B D.

    As usual, I will need to study this some more. Thanks.
     
  20. screamin eagle

    screamin eagle Poster Extraordinaire

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    Location:
    S. CA
    For basic chord progression creation, the I,IV, V are major chords, the ii, iii, vi are minor chords and the VII Ish diminished.
     
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