Choosing is never easy…Duesenberg, Les Paul, or Rickenbacker….?

lammie200

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With that name, the answer better be Germany.

They aren't 'made' in Germany ... much like Fender's aren't 'made' in the USA any more.

I think the official line is that they are assembled in Germany from parts made all over the place.
I should have been more clear. Where are Duesenberg bodies and necks made? I get that a lot of hardware in USA Fenders may come from overseas but, as far as I know, USA Fender bodies and necks are made (cut, shaped, finished, etc.) in the USA. I suspect that a lot of Duesenberg hardware is imported as well. Just curious as to whether the bodies and necks are imported.
 

Timbresmith1

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LP special would be my choice.
The Deusenberg looks like a cheap guitar, to me. The f-holes are inelegant and the hardware design over-wrought. I’m funny like that.
 

Si G X

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I should have been more clear. Where are Duesenberg bodies and necks made? I get that a lot of hardware in USA Fenders may come from overseas but, as far as I know, USA Fender bodies and necks are made (cut, shaped, finished, etc.) in the USA. I suspect that a lot of Duesenberg hardware is imported as well. Just curious as to whether the bodies and necks are imported.

possibly, I really don't know ... the switches are made in the USA apparently and they use Italian made jacks. At this point I'm not sure it matters. If you live in the USA it will all be made elsewhere (other than the switch!) It's put together and finished in Germany but I'm not sure any of it will be actually manufactured there, Germany is one of the most expensive places to manufacture anything this side of the world.
 

StrangerNY

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possibly, I really don't know ... the switches are made in the USA apparently and they use Italian made jacks. At this point I'm not sure it matters. If you live in the USA it will all be made elsewhere (other than the switch!) It's put together and finished in Germany but I'm not sure any of it will be actually manufactured there, Germany is one of the most expensive places to manufacture anything this side of the world.

From what I understand, they're assembled in Germany, and the bodies are built in the same factory (Korea, IIRC) where Reverends are made.

- D
 

Si G X

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From what I understand, they're assembled in Germany, and the bodies are built in the same factory (Korea, IIRC) where Reverends are made.

- D

I thought that was a myth, started by a guitar magazine that printed the wrong information?

The truth is probably out there, but I can't afford their guitars anyway, so I'll leave that for someone else to worry about. 😉

What do you make of this? maybe the carcasses could from elsewhere to germany in this state, then the finishing work carried out in Germany?

1648232000338.png
 

basher

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Les Pauls are better than all other guitars, including the ones that are better than Les Pauls.
 

brookdalebill

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LP special would be my choice.
The Deusenberg looks like a cheap guitar, to me. The f-holes are inelegant and the hardware design over-wrought. I’m funny like that.
They are neither cheap, nor cheaply made.
Every component is premium, as is the fit and finish, IMO.
 

dspellman1

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My favorite LP doesn't say Gibson on the headstock (though I've got a bunch of those and pretty much grew up on them).

My favorite's a neck-through construction with a sculpted neck heel (ala the Axcess), a tummy cut, a 16" radius, jumbo frets, a wider neck at the nut (1 3/4") and a Floyd Rose (heresy!). It's a 24.75" scale with 22 frets, but I've got another with 24 frets and a 25.5" scale. There's a sustainer built in (switches are behind the Floyd), the controls have been moved (there's now a master volume between the bridge and the bridge pickup, a master tone behind that, a chandler Tone-X active sweepable mids boost on a push-pull and a sustainer intensity pot. Behind all of that is a buckethead style kill switch. The neck pickup is a single coil size diMarzio Fast Track II tucked into the same neck pickup ring as the Sustainer driver.

In short, why pick a boring mundane production guitar when you can push the limits a bit?

In your current list, I'd sack the SG and pick up a neck-through superstrat with an HSH setup, a five-way, a master volume/master tone, a mini switch set up as a bridge pickup add-in (to get that SG-style both pickups selected middle switch position) and a pair of coil split switches. No neck dive, a full strat-type setup if you want it (make sure the humbuckers are, say, 13Kohm or above output) and a bunch of extra interesting tones and maybe a 24-fret fretboard and better upper fret access along the way.

I'm also carting around a Variax JTV-89F. Looks like a superstrat, with a 25.5" scale, 16" radius, 24 jumbo frets, 1 3/4" nut width, Floyd Rose, a five way, master volume/master tone, two slightly hot humbuckers and a full suite of Variax models and alternate tunings built in.

Live a little.
 

Killing Floor

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That Mike Campbell Starplayer is awesome. I have a Duesenberg, the build is fantastic and it plays itself. Plus it looks a little unique with the Art Deco hardware. Great pickups.
 

dspellman1

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I've tried a number of Gretsch's. Did not like the necks and the dead sounding body. Never plugged one in though. I'll try again someday, they are attractive guitars.
I've never been interested in a Gretsch. Always thought they were a cah-huntry git tar. And I ain't Cah-huntry. Ner Westrin, neither.

Needless to say, I found myself, last year, buying a G5222. Double cutaway, LP-size, and I dumped the BroadTrons for TV Jones Classic/Classic Plus. Filtertron-alikes. It's sort of the "Malcolm Young standing in the back of AC/DC making the actual sound that we all know as AC/DC" guitar. And then early this year I lost my mind completely and bought a used G2420T. The T stands for Trem, which translates to Bigsby, and I hate Bigsbys. Even more so after the first time I put new strings on the guitar. GACK! The 2420 is a classic single cut thick (ish) hollow-body style guitar in the Chet Atkins style, and it has BroadTrons, too. This is a Streamliner, the cheapest of the lines, and it's surprisingly good. Except for that stinking Bigsby.
 

Peegoo

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I've never been interested in a Gretsch. Always thought they were a cah-huntry git tar. And I ain't Cah-huntry. Ner Westrin, neither.

Needless to say, I found myself, last year, buying a G5222. Double cutaway, LP-size, and I dumped the BroadTrons for TV Jones Classic/Classic Plus. Filtertron-alikes. It's sort of the "Malcolm Young standing in the back of AC/DC making the actual sound that we all know as AC/DC" guitar. And then early this year I lost my mind completely and bought a used G2420T
Don't forget Billy Duffy of The Cult. He recorded and toured with Gretsch White Falcons. They are a heavy rock band, and Duffy is a riffmeister par excellence.
 

DanglingNutslots

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I've never been interested in a Gretsch. Always thought they were a cah-huntry git tar. And I ain't Cah-huntry. Ner Westrin, neither.

Needless to say, I found myself, last year, buying a G5222. Double cutaway, LP-size, and I dumped the BroadTrons for TV Jones Classic/Classic Plus. Filtertron-alikes. It's sort of the "Malcolm Young standing in the back of AC/DC making the actual sound that we all know as AC/DC" guitar. And then early this year I lost my mind completely and bought a used G2420T. The T stands for Trem, which translates to Bigsby, and I hate Bigsbys. Even more so after the first time I put new strings on the guitar. GACK! The 2420 is a classic single cut thick (ish) hollow-body style guitar in the Chet Atkins style, and it has BroadTrons, too. This is a Streamliner, the cheapest of the lines, and it's surprisingly good. Except for that stinking Bigsby.
Hehe, you’ve gone from one extreme to another. I have a guitar with TV Jones’ in them. They’re good if not spectacular pickups. I think my next guitar is going to be one of the new Revstars, Gretsch isn’t on my radar this year.
 

dspellman1

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Don't forget Billy Duffy of The Cult. He recorded and toured with Gretsch White Falcons. They are a heavy rock band, and Duffy is a riffmeister par excellence.
I think the fairly recent emphasis on reducing stage volume has made some of these big hollowbodies a lot more usable in that environment. Rather than needing to crank a Marshall stack, my rig crap goes mostly direct to the board and out from there, and I mostly just have a floor monitor or two that are set fairly low. I've got a few big hollowbodies, but haven't had an occasion to use them with a band.
 

Jakeboy

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You need a Strat in your stable. You really do. Strats were Petty’s favorite guitar.

If you go Ric get a 660 since TP came up with that formula….wider neck, toasters, 620 body, etc.
 




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