Chili-What's your recipe?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by garytelecastor, Mar 13, 2017.

  1. screamin eagle

    screamin eagle Poster Extraordinaire

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    Man I'm getting hungry.
     
  2. uriah1

    uriah1 Telefied Gold Supporter

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    Ground turkey burger
    3Cans of hot Brooks chili Beans
    1Can brooks chili fixin
    1Can stewed tomatoes
    1onion cut
    Cumin
    Chil powder

    Crock pot for about 4 - 5hours

    yum

    Web fowler if I can find it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2017
  3. 1293

    1293 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Oh yeah? I've got some lamb in the fridge for shepard's pie tomorrow night. I'm ready for a throwdown.
     
  4. dkmw

    dkmw Poster Extraordinaire

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    Is Keith coming over? Better let him break the crust or you'll have to make another one:)
     
  5. bchaffin72

    bchaffin72 Friend of Leo's

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    I've been vegan for quite a while now and I've learned to make some pretty good and flavorful food without any animal products. And I don't use meat substitutes that often, with two exceptions: chili and spaghetti sauce. Given the way I used make both, neither eats right to me without something meaty in them, which is where the ground not-beef comes in.
     
  6. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

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    I don't have a recipe I just keep throwing stuff in until it tastes good. I tend to favor a lot of cumin and a tablespoon or two of peanut butter. I would like it to be very very spicey but my family not so much

    I do have a good vegetarian chili recipe which is also vegan if you skip the sour cream and cheese condiments. Just from Epicurious, vegetarian black bean chili
     
  7. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    chili.jpg
     
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  8. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

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    hamburger of some kind, maybe some ground pork if its around, some chili powder if it's around or make up my own. extra cumin, maybe tomatoes maybe not, cinnamon if I want to get fancy, sometimes mustard powder, onion, garlic, maybe some bell peppers--I think chili is sort of a thing you throw together, like risotto or paella but less fancy.

    Also try a little peanut butter. Lots of west african dishes have chilis and ground peanuts. I figure SW chili probably has some Africa in it somewhere way back
     
  9. Pisgah

    Pisgah Tele-Meister

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    No use tryin' to beat Texas Chilli Parlour XX. Its good on top of a steak, too.
     
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  10. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Is it just a coincidence that this thread is next to the cornbread thread? I always make cornbread to go with muh chili. Crackers is for diners.
     
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  11. Tony Done

    Tony Done Friend of Leo's

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    My preference is vegetarian.

    Canola oil
    A lot of minced garlic
    Good canned tomatoes - eg Ardmona Rich and Thick
    Canned red beans, drained
    Cumin
    Tabasco
    Salt
    A little sugar

    Cook until the beans are reasonably soft.

    Nice with rice and a fried egg on top.
     
  12. teletimetx

    teletimetx Doctor of Teleocity

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    There’s always a geographical component to food and that’s a good thing.

    The wiki-ness relates that chili peppers were “domesticated” in Mexico over 6,000 years ago. I’m not sure exactly what it means to domesticate a plant, but cultivate might be an equally useful description.

    The idea would be that chili peppers have been around a long time. Longer than canned beans and so forth. And since I’ve been subjected all things Texas for more than 20 years, I have to say that once you put beans and other “foreign” foods in the pot, it ain’t chili no more. Might taste perfectly ok, as do any number of vegan ‘chilis’ and have it all you like, just don’t expect everyone to agree that it’s ‘chili’.

    My thinking is that there’s a reason it’s called chili. And it’s not required that the resulting dish has to exceed some particular insane level on the Scoville pepper scale. You want more than one kind of pepper in there, and achieving a good blend is a good thing. Pasilla, ancho and guajillo – these three are a good place to start. I realize that not every place on the planet has a ready supply. Red, relatively mild, air dried and then toasted on a comal (flat cast-iron pan). Chipotle is ok, but I pull the seeds out before adding and I recommend you do the same. Chiles de arbol, jalapeños, pequins, these are choices that can work. Anaheim? That’s for those Californians. If I could get some of those Chimayo peppers from New Mexico, I’d do that all day long.

    While you’re at it, you might toast some of your cumin on the comal. The toasted peppers are tossed in a blender with some chicken or other stock and liquefied. Lots of folks use chili powders and that’s ok, too, but don’t get stuck on just one. Complexity is your friend, to a degree. I lean towards more anchos than the others.

    And yeah, expensive meat doesn’t belong in Chili. Nope, there’s a point to slow cooking. Ground meat is ok, but you probably don’t want to cook that all day.

    I prefer my onions slightly caramelized. Don’t be shy with garlic. A little citrus juice in there is ok, too – orange or lime, not so much lemons or pomelos. A little bit of tomato, ok, but don’t overdo it. You’re not trying to make marinara. No oregano, no cinnamon. Nope. None. Cinnamon is for moles. Different stuff.

    You want instant, get a can opener.

    About a pound or pound and a half of meat; cheap stew cuts, here in Houston you can get carne picada which are trimmings that have been sort of shredded. Pork steak is ok too. What’s on sale? That’s what you are going to use.

    Do all your chili toasting first, you’ll need about 2 dozen chilis, a couple bags, if that’s the way you find them where you are and two or three cups of stock. Ok, if you want to toss a few tomatoes in with the chilis into the blender, have at it. The resulting blenderized fluid should be slightly thick, not watery. Pour that stuff in your slow cook pot. Might take a few loads in the blender.

    Then you’re going to lightly brown the meat in a little olive oil and/or butter. Low heat, you just want to get the meat started. If you got some chili powder, through some on the meat as it browns. Toss the meat in your slow cook pot with the blenderized chilis.

    Using the same pan you used for the meat, toss in the diced onions. A little chili powder on the onions won’t hurt anything either. When the onions are about transparent, time for the minced fresh garlic; you’ll want at least four, five cloves, at least half a head. Scoot the onions out of the middle of the pan, add a little butter, and when the butter’s melted, toss in the garlic. Smells good, doesn’t it? Then mix it all in with the onions, and for good measure about one good sip of the beer you’ve been drinking.

    The onions and garlic gets added to the slow cook pot when slightly caramelized. Add your seasonings – a little salt, and a little cumin. I’m not a big fan of cumin, a little goes a long way. You can always add more; check it for taste after the first hour goes by. Wait ‘til near the end to add orange or lime juice if you’re going to do that at all, or just leave out some lime or orange sections that can be squeezed on top.

    Now slow cook. All day is best, but at least 3 or 4 hours. Low and slow. If you absolutely have a particular consistency, as in not watery, add some tomato paste to thicken or stock to thin. It will get thicker the longer you cook it, although if you use a crock pot with a lid, shouldn’t lose too much of the liquid.

    A real good chili won’t need toppings, but if you got to, then have some avocado, grated cheese, diced fresh jalapeño or cilantro around. Folks that like fresh diced onion can add some of that as well. And yeah chili verde is a whole ‘nother thing.

    Who’s bringing the beer?
     
  13. JReazor

    JReazor Tele-Holic

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    It's been a while since I don't live there anymore but Hard Times Chili in Alexandria, VA made an amazing veggie chili. They always had 3 varieties available at any given time but the vegetarian was my absolute favorite. I'm not even close to being a vegetarian. It had peanuts in it which worked really well.
     
  14. dkmw

    dkmw Poster Extraordinaire

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    That's gold, teletimetx.

    I think ''domesticate'' means that the Meso-Americans began to cultivate the plants and start to breed size and variety. Maize has been cited as the first genetic engineering by humans; it began as a grass that had tiny ''ears'' of what we would come to know as corn. They bred to achieve bigger ears.

    I used to grow a lot of chiles, at one time I had about 15 varieties going at once. I'd be making chili like you if I still had all those plants going. But I'd put in more cumin:)

    I also throw chili powder on the meat while I sear; I guess I wasn't the only one that thought of that...

    One question, though... If you caramelize the onions first and then slow cook for hours, don't they disappear? By the time I'm done with a batch, the raw onion I started with is about caramelized and disintegrated. I also feel it gives up a little more onion flavor into the mix if it goes in raw.
     
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  15. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    That was breath taking. When I read that I really felt like a fish out of water when it comes to cooking...and I'm the cook of this household. Your knowledge of the nature and preparation of peppers is enviable. I don't use em' at all because they frighten me. In my mind they are like serving puffer fish. If you don't do it right you'll kill your guests.:)

    I'm determined to try your recipe and to integrate peppers into my culinary repertoire. Both of my "chili" recipes are decidedly in the faux category. Thanks for another gem of a post!
     
  16. jondanger

    jondanger Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    A tour de force. I'm glad I jumped into this thread. I'll be referencing this post soon I hope.
     
  17. Blue Bill

    Blue Bill Poster Extraordinaire

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    If you're talking about the one in Austin, near the capitol, that was my first bowl of "real" chili, except I ordered XXX. The very attractive waitress said, "Y'all know ya can't send it back now, right? If it's too hot." Okey-dokey I said. It was sublimely delicious, but so hot it was like mescaline or something; I managed to finish the bowl, (to impress the waitress, mostly), I was high for a couple hours afterwards.

    Totally hooked, I read Frank X Tolbert's book a couple times and launched into my chili adventure, eventually winning 4th place in the New England Open chili contest. Now I make it a couple times a year, in a big batch.

    Here's the recipe: No beans, noodles, celery, corn, turkey, chicken, peanut butter, coffee, textured vegetable protein, rice, kale, cilantro, or dairy products. Just beef, peppers, chili powder, garlic, beer, cumin, corriander, more garlic, more beer, Optional: add some pork, a little tomato paste, and onions. Mmmmmmmmm.
     
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  18. BartS

    BartS Friend of Leo's

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    Normally girls make chili. I am not sure if that's on the list of things I am allowed to cook or not. I would have to check. If I did cook chili I would just grab what ever beef was in the freezer. Cook that up. Add a can of beans what every chili seasoning a female gave me and then I would just add a bottle of hot sauce till I liked the taste.

    I know guys get all excited about cooking chili. They also do all kinds of girl stuff I don't understand. Thing is it's chili having a recipe for it is kind of missing the point. Just grab what ever you got around the house and put it in the pot. Left over brisket in it goes. Half a can of pickled jalapenos in the fridge. Dump it in there vinegar and everything. Only have a thing of taco seasoning. That will do it.
     
  19. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    And here's another one of those posts of yours where I'd really appreciate having a "Bless his little heart" button...
     
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  20. teletimetx

    teletimetx Doctor of Teleocity

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    The onions if cooked that long after being caramelized will disappear. But they also add a little bit of sweetness, which most folks kind of like. One alternative is to not dice the onions so fine - or just make extra to use as one of the toppings. And yeah, you definitely will get more fresh onion flavor and probably more vitamins if you put them in raw. I'd call that a fielder's choice and raise my beer bottle to a fine bowl of chili.
     
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