Cherry tele build

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by pypa, Jul 22, 2020.

  1. pypa

    pypa TDPRI Member

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    I made the fretboard a little thinner and shaved a little from the pocket. I am not sure it will make a difference. I am a hair proud of 3/8” finished height before radiusing.

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  2. pypa

    pypa TDPRI Member

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    I cut the feet slots for real and glued up the neck today. I debated radiusing the fretboard first, but I thought that would be easier once the fretboard is trimmed and elevated off the bench by the neck.

    I was worried about aligning the two parts as many people use pins or salt. But it was quite doable without those aids with just a little care.

    I used Titebond 3 and a clamping caul to get even pressure.

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  3. 1bad914

    1bad914 Tele-Holic

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    I have a cherry capped sapele CS 356 shaped body I need to finish up. Love the cherry wood. The smell when you work with it is great.
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  4. pypa

    pypa TDPRI Member

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    Nice! I also love the smell.

    I trimmed the fretboard and shaped the transition. I used a #4 to bring it flush and square and a shaver around the neck transition sides. I used a spindle sander for the bevel.

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  5. ctmullins

    ctmullins Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

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    You take nice photos. ;)
     
  6. pypa

    pypa TDPRI Member

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    I radiused the fretboard. I used a small radiused sanding block to start. It identified the high spots. The dust also fills the frets under the high spots. I then made one or two passes with the #4 over those high spots. Repeating this made quite quick work of it. I was afraid of this step, but I found as long as you go slow and check often, it's quite doable.

    I also did not realize until I started radiusing that the head end needs less work than the wider heel; full length passes would have resulted in a thinner head end. So, I used the center line as the reference. I aimed to keep the unsanded margin around the center line consistent up and down the neck, and stopped sanding a section when the center line was reached.

    The cheap radiusing block I ordered is about 6" long. At first I regretted this purchase. But using the above method, I think a smaller block might actually be beneficial, since you can true up the radius locally, while using the plane to keep the fretboard flat and level along its length.

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    Last edited: Jul 31, 2020 at 9:17 AM
  7. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    That neck is looking really great!
     
  8. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Having built a few necks, I have found that my best necks involved the long, commercially made, aluminum radius beam, which is considerably longer than a 6 " block. I personally think and have found that you will end up with a more level surface, and resulting more level frets that way.

    That being said, I don't know if a plane would do the same thing with a similar result, but it's interesting to watch.

    I might attach some sticky abrasive to the bottom of the plane and see what materializes to your surface at this point.


    My original " radius sanding block" about 40 years ago was made from pieces of outer plywood circular waste glued together. This was before radius blocks were a commercial entity and even discussed. It was probably 4-5 inches long. It worked, but when longer blocks came out, I got way better results.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2020 at 10:04 AM
  9. pypa

    pypa TDPRI Member

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    Thank you. I accept that with humility. I'd love to invest in an aluminum block. They're pricey though...

    I am unsure what the abrasive to the bottom of the plane would accomplish. The full length shavings (and a straight edge) confirmed that I was flat along the length at all parts.
     
  10. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I'm not even a "lousy" plane user at this point in time, so you very well could have a great surface in which to fret. I'm just speaking from my own experiences with fretboard surfaces. Even one that comes off a cnc gets trued up on the radius beam. You can see the irregularities that the cnc left during that process.


    Many people level their fret tops with a machines beam that is flat.
     
  11. pypa

    pypa TDPRI Member

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    hmmm, now you have me wondering.... I'm north of "lousy" with my planes, but a little south of CNC and certainly well south of "machined flat aluminum". How can I check this to make sure I'm good to move on to fretting?
     
  12. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I would procure a machined straight edge at the least. Guys will say use a yardstick from harbor freight or some other cheap tool... but I'm a proponent of dead flat myself. As always. YMMV. :) When you consider that the fret placement and fretboard surface are a couple of the most critical components on the guitar, that's a place to be as accurate as you can.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2020 at 11:39 AM
  13. pypa

    pypa TDPRI Member

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    Oh I see. Yes, I have a number of aluminum and steel machined, trusted straight edges, as well as a couple trusted winding sticks that I use for jointing and flattening boards. I realize the precision here is next level, but I've checked a couple ways...
     
  14. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    I bought mine from Philadelphia Luthier Supply...the price was better than many other sources. I bought the mid-length version for the first one.

    https://www.philadelphialuthiertools.com/sanding-beam/
     
  15. Collin D Plonker

    Collin D Plonker Tele-Meister

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    Looks great. If it's too heavy, make it.inyo a Thinline.
     
  16. pypa

    pypa TDPRI Member

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    45F5EBB8-E237-432D-A45C-95888DA5E127.jpeg I started shaping the neck and body today.

    I was planning on a pickguard (a decision I regret but am now bound to by the wire channel) so I am unsure how aggressively to round over the top edge of the body. My eye also wants the belly cut on the bottom to be symmetrical but I won’t get fancy there as I am nervous to hit the switch channel.

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  17. pypa

    pypa TDPRI Member

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    I think my next step is to install the frets. I decided to contour before so that I wouldn’t damage the frets when clamping the neck in the vise first shaping.

    The edges of the wood fretboard are sharp. Should I ease those edges before installing the frets? Seems like it would be hard to do this after the frets are installed.
     
  18. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Yes. I take my sanding block and hit the edges before fretting. Make yourself a Don teeter fret beveler. Then bevel the frets to a consistant angle. Then take a needle file with a safe edge and round the fret ends.


    This is my method: Post 155 on

    https://www.tdpri.com/threads/lets-make-a-neck-volume-2.1007965/page-8#post-9678674


    A graphic representation of a don teeter fret dresser p.23 The initial wood block is 1.75" x 1.75" x 10" and holds a mill file.



    Acoustic Guitar Maintenance and Repair.
    By Don E Teeter
    1975


    teeter.JPG



    https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-acoustic-guitar-don-e-teeter/1113804194
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2020 at 8:46 AM
  19. pypa

    pypa TDPRI Member

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    Fantastic! Thank you so much for that link. Sorry to ask the obvious, but is the correct order of ops this?

    1. File slot tops (Triangular needle file)
    2. Install frets (thin ca glue)
    3. Level frets (planning to use a diamond flattening plate I use for whetstone flattening.
    4. Crown frets (fret crowning file)
    5. Flush ends (Mill file)
    6. Bevel ends (mill file , I may use the diamond plate for this too)

    I guess I am asking if I should trim and flush the ends before leveling.
     
  20. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I sand fretboard up to 220 with radius beam. Then use a triangular file on the fret slots. I bend my 2" feet of fretwire on the bender. I start at the body end with the widest fretwire. I press it and cut it. I work my way up to fret number one.

    After a few frets are installed ( I use a press), I nip the ends with a cutter that is ground. After all the frets are in, I put my rods and caul on. I glue the fret ends only. Capillary action does the rest. I file the ends flush to the fretboard with the Teeter jig, Then I bevel the ends with the Teeter jig. I tend to file until there is a little flat on the edge of the fretboard.

    Lastly, I round the ends with the triangular file with ground edge.

    The fret leveling would come later because in many cases it isn't needed for my action requirements. That's why you want a radius beam and fret press :).
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2020 at 10:56 AM
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