Checking & Relicing Acrylic Lacquer - My Results

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Proozenburg, Jul 6, 2020.

  1. Proozenburg

    Proozenburg TDPRI Member

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    Hi All,

    I wanted to share my results with relicing Acrylic Lacquer. Nitro is hard to come by in the Netherlands, so I tried out some relicing & lacquer checking on acrylic. The cheap stuff from a local hardware store (Gamma)

    This is the lacquer: https://www.gamma.nl/assortiment/ok-spuitlak-kleurloos-blank-400-ml/p/B537281

    About $3 per can

    I let it cure for about 3 to four weeks. I started with an ash body that I did not grain fill, because I liked the look of the sunken grain. Basically I used compressed air in a can sprayed upside down to create the checking, I read some people heat it up with a blowdryer before hand, I didn't. Also it took me some time to figure out how I could 'guide' the way it would check. On the sides the results are more how I would a second kind of body like this.

    Spray it on, let it freeze, wipe it off - and fill the checking to prevent them sealing back together with something (I used some acrylic paint mixed with water), wiped it clean & buffed it back up.

    Besides that the usual: some scraping with a hobby knife & hitting it with some keys and big old belt buckles.

    So - now for some pics... EDIT: Pics have been edited to increase the visibility of the checking, in real life it's not as dark. But they are hard to photograph.

    The bare body:
    [​IMG]

    The body nice and clean - prerelic:
    [​IMG]

    The relicing & checking:
    [​IMG]

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    Last edited: Jul 6, 2020
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  2. steadyriot

    steadyriot Tele-Meister

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    Looks good!
    If you want nitro in the Netherlands, you can order it online.
    A lot of graffiti paints are nitro based. Montana lacquer is a great one.
     
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  3. aleski

    aleski TDPRI Member

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    Yeah, I'd buy that. Well done.
     
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  4. cdwillis

    cdwillis Tele-Meister

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    The checking and whatnot looks good, but it looks a bit odd without grain filler beforehand.
     
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  5. sleazy pot pie

    sleazy pot pie Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    I like everything about this one. nice choice on pickguard color
     
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  6. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    If it is conventional acrylic lacquer it dries only by evaporation - there is NO cure time with either acrylic or nitrocellulose (or blended) lacquer. The only ones that "cure" are products that contain chemical or UV light curing agents.

    Standard lacquer dries in 30-60 minutes. There are products to watch out for with very slow dry times that are a combination of nitro or acrylic lacquer and oil based enamel - in the US Colortone and Deft are good examples. They take hours...or days...to dry. But they don't "cure" either! You can recognize them by looking at the MSDS - the normally contain two or more of naphtha, alkyd resin, petroleum distillates - and the product data sheet specifying hard dry times in excess of 60 minutes.

    But standard acrylic lacquer will check as well as nitrocellulose. But realistic relic work goes FAR beyond checking and abraded ares. It has to match the player's normal position, and "clean" checks and wear look phony - they have to show years of use and wear. It's artwork and the techniques take years to perfect!
     
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  7. Proozenburg

    Proozenburg TDPRI Member

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    Thanks for the info! I did not know there was a difference between curing and drying... but now that you mention it... in Dutch I talked about this guitar being ‘droog genoeg’ (dry enough). So it makes sense!

    It wasn’t dry enough after one day, I could still press my nail into it, then circumstances (work) let me no other choice than to let it dry for 3 weeks :)

    I’m far from a relic artist, but I’m quite content with the light relic job on this tele. I look at it as a starting point from where the natural wear will continue. I basically looked at my esquire partscaster - also lacquered in acrylic, but not reliced - on where it started to wear and tried to reproduce that on this one.

    My esquire aged itself quite quickly in the 5 years of gigging.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  8. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    That usually indicates you're applying the coating too thickly.

    Apply each coat by making three VERY thin passes. A single coat of color should NOT cover - it'll be very transparent. If you are spraying each coat to cover you're trying to "paint" - and lacquer is NOT paint.

    Practice next time on scrap - 3 thin passes per THIN coat, and that should be hard in 30-60 minutes. You should be able to apply the next coat in 30-45 minutes, though. At 3-4 coats it will start to melt into itself and smooth out.

    I just finished a Tele - On the first day I applied sanding sealer, paste wood filler, another coat of sanding sealer; then the next day I applied 5 coats of Valspar white lacquer, 4 coats of Valspar clear gloss (all THIN coats, and all sprayed with my HVLP), waited a couple of hours and buffed it. Oh, the rosewood board neck just got sanding sealer and 4 coats of gloss. I started assembling it that night.

    No sanding was needed = and shouldn't be if you have worked out your technique through practice.

    I finished assembling it the next morning and the customer picked it up that afternoon. 3 days from start to finish, although it was really done in two days.

    Unless I'm doing relic work or a complicated pattern of some sort no fender-type guitar has taken longer than 3 days from start to finish in the last 20 years or so!
     
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