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Cheap-ish Delta 13" planer ok?

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by goodchicken, Oct 25, 2018.

  1. goodchicken

    goodchicken TDPRI Member

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    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Delta-1...RbPjv-LGEmcz6lk52IsaAnKgEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

    I'm wondering what I can get by with for a planer such as the Delta 22-555. I'm mostly going to be buying pre-planed boards, but I'd going to plane some off. For example, I have a 1.78" board that I want to take down to 1 5/8" or possibly 1 1/2" for a thin, light weight body. I'm not churning out lots of guitars or doing any other significant wood work for that matter.

    Would you consider this little one for my needs? Possible issues? I've looked on CraigsList for a few months, haven't seen much to speak of.

    Thanks!
     
  2. eallen

    eallen Friend of Leo's

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    I have an older model. Works like a charm! Plenty of power. Sharp knives are a must and about $30 a set. If you arent a planer user be aware they are moster saw dust creators!

    Eric
     
  3. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    You probably won't care much for my response but I'll give it to you anyway. 20 years ago or more, Ryobi came out with a 10 inch lunchbox planer that was similar to these other 12 and 13" wide planers. While they were better than no planer, they were notorious for putting snipe into the beginning and ends of the wood you plane. Snipe is a dip in the wood from the cutterhead and wood moving . Planers used to have pressure bars to hold the wood down and these lunchbox planers don't. They rely on the rollers to do that. My father in law had and still has the Ryobi one, although he doesn't really use it anymore.

    I have owned heavy duty cast iron planers over the years and these small ones don't compare. I currently own a Jet 13 planer/molder that is in need of repair from being water soaked by a busted pipe and seized up. That is solid cast iron and weighs a couple hundred pounds.

    I bought a Dewalt 735 to use until it finally gets fixed and it is kind of a disappointing machine. When it is cold in the garage, the rollers won't feed, so you have to push the wood through. You can't take much more than a 1/32 off boards that are wide and dense.

    The 3 knife double sided knives are thin and nick easily but that is when it works OK. After a short while the knives get dull. The knives are pricey and don't hold up very long, and I don't even plane that much wood anymore. One plus is the Dewalt has a built in dust collector so you don't really need a dust collector if you don't have one.


    The bottom line is you want a 13" planer for guitar work, but you might be better off getting a real heavy duty one like a Grizzly, Jet, or other cast iron one. Another idea would be to buy an abrasive drum sander for your work.


    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B003OX9KME/?tag=tdpri-20

    http://www.grizzly.com/products/Gri...MIsdOYxsmi3gIV1bXACh0CvwyAEAQYASABEgJy9fD_BwE


    https://www.woodcraft.com/products/...MIiImy7smi3gIViLXACh1nog3ZEAQYBSABEgLYRvD_BwE


    https://www.amazon.com/d/Electric-P...F8&qid=1540505275&sr=1-3&keywords=drum+sander


    http://www.grizzly.com/products/Grizzly-16-Drum-Sander-w-Rubber-Conveyor/G1079R
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2018
  4. Speedy454

    Speedy454 Tele-Holic

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    I have to 2nd most of what guitarbuilder said.
    I have a craftsman 12 1/2" that I picked up 2nd hand for $100.
    You get what you pay for.
    Mine also has the issue with not feeding when the rollers are cold. The rubber gets cold and just won't grip the wood to feed it through.
    Mine used to snipe on the infeed and outfeed. I mostly eliminated it by building a very long infeed/outfeed table from 3/4 white melame coated particle board. It is about 5 foot long, 12 1/2" wide and sits right in the middle of the planer. I use the crappy factory built in tables to level the melame table and have legs to support the ends of the table. Yes, I lose 3/4 inch of depth, but I don't miss it at all.
    The slick finish lets the wood feed easily and it keeps some of the wood chips from getting into the nooks and crannies of the bottom of the planer.
    If I was going to get really serious about this stuff, I think I'd rather have a really good drum sander anyway. No tear out, no dull blades.
     
  5. Cantbreak100guy

    Cantbreak100guy Tele-Holic

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    guitarbuilder gave away a year of experience for free! I own a dewalt 733. Same as the 734, with only two blades. It's ok. Snipe every time, and chips out maple unless I have freshly sharpened blades. It all depends on how much you will use it, but, you will be disappointed with a cheapie. If you live in my area you may use mine for free.
     
  6. RedHills

    RedHills Tele-Meister

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    3rd what's said...I've found very few "cheapish" tools that were worth it. Got one of the big box jointers....hell my DeWalt job site table saw creates a better glue edge.
     
  7. RodeoTex

    RodeoTex Doctor of Teleocity

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    I've had my 22-555 fors 5 or 6 months know and have been very pleased with it.
    Although I'm not a real heavy user of it, It has been great.
    Of course, when it faulters I'll just replace the blades or the whole thing.
     
  8. goodchicken

    goodchicken TDPRI Member

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    Well budget really matters here, but I've been down the road of buying too little tool for the job and being burned. Drum sanders are usually around a grand or more, right? The Dewalt 735 is more in my price range if it's a significant upgrade over the cheaper Delta I linked to.

    I won't have an issue with rollers not working due to temperature. I may build a guitar a month, maybe blades will last a decent amount time? Sounds like snipe may be remedied with some rigging...

    Maybe I should consider cheaper options like hand planing. Never tried it, just heard it takes practice and time...issues the tabletop planer was supposed to solve lol.
     
  9. getbent

    getbent Telefied Silver Supporter

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    I've been planing all summer like a madman on rough sawn wood (chainsaw milled) and I use a Wen 13" I got from amazon... it is a beast and I'm totally happy... 230.00 so, go for it!
     
  10. eallen

    eallen Friend of Leo's

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    As I said, I have an older version of the Delta I have had for over a dozen years. I haven't had snipe once the infeed and outfeed tables are adjusted correctly after I first got it. I can hog material off by turning the adjuster a full half turn on maple or oak no problems. I will say mine is a 2 speed version which helps on smoothness in the final pass. It has had a lot of hardwood thru it. The key to good results planing tearout prone wood is wetting the surface with a damp cloth before each pass.

    I have had to clean the rollers a few times over the years when the stoppl feeding smothly. Once cleaned they go back to their job.

    These do not compare to commercial versions but they are also not a commercial price. All depends on what you are using it for.

    Eric
     
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  11. Nickfl

    Nickfl Friend of Leo's

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    I have a Rigid 13" planer that I got second hand off craigslist. I use it pretty lightly, but am very glad I have it when I need it and it works well for me. The guy I bought it from said he hadn't had it long but put some serious mileage on it making cabinets for his house before I got it and it seems to have held up well.

    I agree with eallen's comments, if you just want a planer for making body blanks and hobby stuff and you have reasonable expectations you will probably be fine with a big box store machine. If you need every tool you own to be professional quality and you expect it to turn out finish quality surfaces, you will be disappointed.
     
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  12. Pup Tentacle

    Pup Tentacle Tele-Holic

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    I have the Dewalt 735. It's a decent planer, much better than any of the 12" ones I've seen. If you run some sacrificial boards butted up tight before and after your main material you can virtually eliminate any snipe.
     
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  13. jimgchord

    jimgchord Tele-Afflicted

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    They are fine for light duty work. Be ready for a bit of vibration. They are what they are.
     
  14. jimgchord

    jimgchord Tele-Afflicted

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    hand planing is an option, just make sure you're competent at sharpening
     
  15. SacDAve

    SacDAve Poster Extraordinaire

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    I have an old Makita 15" plainer (actually 15 7/8") I bought new in the 80's. It's worked great since I've owned it I did replace the rollers. If I was to buy another one I'd step up to a 20" or 24". But the 12" & 13" seem to be great tool for the average home shop or to bring on jobs. The 16" planers are ideal for guitar body's but theres a huge step up in price. One thing to consider is how addicted you are to woodworking are you just building guitars? Myself I build all kinds of stuff and having worked with wood my whole life bigger and more power is better. My honest opinion for $280 it's probably an OK plainer but I would try to step it up to the Dewalt or Makita 13" but the your about $650 to $700.. You could keep an eye on CL but add the cost of a set of blades and most the planners that show up are usually 3 phase monsters.
     
  16. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    I have the Dewalt. As a small time builder who has a habit of making a bunch of bodies, it's been very good to me. All the issues above have happened to me but patience and practice helped resolve those.
     
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  17. spyderxxx

    spyderxxx Tele-Meister

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    I have the Delta and just planned a 40 by 13 inch blank from 1 7/8 to 1 3/4 and it worked fine.
     
  18. chauncy

    chauncy Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    with the rigid if you register you get lifetime parts
    i too have this dilemma. i keep an eye on facebook marketplace and craigslist.
    as well as local auctions
     
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