Cheap Chinese Pedal Kits: The Fuzz

Discussion in 'Burnt Fingers DIY Effects' started by jimdkc, Jul 3, 2019.

  1. jimdkc

    jimdkc Friend of Leo's

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    Who doesn't love fuzz pedals?

    Just the word "fuzz" conjures up fond memories of "Satisfaction" by the Rolling Stones... or Iron Butterfly's "In A Gadda Da Vida"... or Jimi playing "Purple Haze". (Did I just date myself, or what???)

    Here's the link to the Fuzz kit that I bought:

    https://geek.wish.com/product/57ae65ea1ec1897b7fea483e

    I paid $15.20 + $9 Shipping for a total of $24.20. I see the price is now up to $19 + $10 shipping. Definitely shop around for this one. I think you can do better than that!

    I actually like the cheezy bull graphic on it! The same kit seems to be available with a sparkly purple enclosure, too. It looks like DHgate may have the best prices (I've never bought from DHgate... YMMV...)
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2019
  2. jimdkc

    jimdkc Friend of Leo's

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    Here are my PCB Scans:

    [​IMG]

    And the X-Ray view I made to help trace the circuit:

    [​IMG]
     
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  3. jimdkc

    jimdkc Friend of Leo's

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    And... Here's my schematic (PDF file attached...)

    This circuit is similar to an Electro-Harmonix Op Amp Big Muff Pi.

    Here's an interesting video of Billy Corgan of Smashing Pumpkins talking about the Op Amp Big Muff Pi:

     

    Attached Files:

  4. Whatizitman

    Whatizitman Friend of Leo's

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  5. Mechanic

    Mechanic Friend of Leo's

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    Just purchased this as well. It’s been too long, 15-20 years since I’ve done any thing of this scope.
     
  6. vkinetic

    vkinetic Tele-Meister

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    Why bother making one - get the Behringer SF300 Super Fuzz. Costs hardly anything (in Australia its around $AUD42). Does the trick for me and even behaves just like the high end fuzzes when you turn down your guitar you get hints of ring modulation. If you play high up the neck you get octave fuzz sounds at some settings. Its a no brainer, for me anyway. It is a plastic case but I've been using mine now for quite some time with no issues. If someone drops something on your pedal board it probably won't survive, in which case you just go out and buy another one. No more botique fuzzes for me! In fact after seeing JHS pedal's YouTube clip about Behringer pedals generally I now have their Graphic EQ, Echo Machine and Compressor as well. People can laugh as much as they like, but I am picky about my sound (this pedal board with the Behringers is for my tele going into a VoxAC15 for my blues/swamp band, whereas for my rock band I have a Fractal AX8). I'll put my helmet on now and laugh in the back room with my bank manager.
     
  7. VintageSG

    VintageSG Friend of Leo's

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    1) Something to do.
    2) Learning about circuits by doing.
    3) You get a pedal at the end of it.
    4) Circuit bending platform.
    5) No investment in Vero, boxes of components etc.
    6) Solder practice.

    Sure, you can buy a Chinese mini pedal for not much more, and some of those are fantastic ( I do like the fuzzes and have a fair few ), or a plastic boxed Behringer ( yup, I've got some of those too[1] ), but as an inexpensive gateway to building bigger and better things, the kits have their place.
    When you factor in what comes in the kit, it is difficult to buy everything separately for a lower cost, plus you get the case pre-drilled, which can be reused for late Veroperiments.

    [1] My permanent pedal board lodgers include a Behringer compressor, Hellbabe wah, a VT999 overdrive and a tremolo. I have a Behringer Vintage delay ( plastic ) too, which is quite good. For the penurious home twiddler, they're OK, and the plastic ones are far sturdier than haters will admit.
     
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  8. jimdkc

    jimdkc Friend of Leo's

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    I have a few Danelectro pedals, and a few pre-assembled inexpensive Chinese pedals (i.e.: Kokko, Joyo, Ammoon - can sometimes be had for LESS than the kits!). And, yes, you can find some really cheap pedals that sound really good!

    But I like hands-on projects. I like to draw schematics. I like to solder. I like to build stuff. I like learning about the circuits. I like experimenting and modifying. I like having something that I built! I'm doing this more to have fun than to save any money!
     
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  9. Mechanic

    Mechanic Friend of Leo's

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    I’ve always been a DIY guy. Why I became a Mechanic. Why I do my own setups, car maintenance, build hot rods AND make my own music. It’s a hobby that makes me happy. If your buying cheap pedals to save money so you can gig to earn money, your in the wrong gig. Look into a biz degree to make money. We’ll still be having fun building stuff.
     
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  10. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Telefied Ad Free Member

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    You're gonna havta add more chilies.
     
  11. zippofan

    zippofan Tele-Afflicted

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    LOL I don't build pedals to save money! I've probably spent more building up my depleted parts stash, plus enclosures and pots/switches to have purchased inexpensive clones of all the pedals I've built.

    Building pedals keeps me outta Mrs. Z's way and a lot of fun to boot :D
     
  12. Mechanic

    Mechanic Friend of Leo's

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    Has anyone here built one yet? Just got mine today. I know thing are labeled but I feel I need to relearn the color codes to the resisters and differences between pics and micro farrads.
     
  13. sully75

    sully75 TDPRI Member

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    So I just got it together and it's dead. The light comes on when the guitar is plugged in but otherwise no sound. I went over the wiring and it seems like I got it right. I wired the grounds to the output jack shield. I see some voltages when I touch various parts but I'm not sure what I'm looking for.

    Any ideas? Point me in the right direction?
     

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  14. jimdkc

    jimdkc Friend of Leo's

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    Do you get any output when the circuit is bypassed? If not, check the jack wiring carefully. And the switch. You can check these with an ohmmeter.

    If you have a small battery powered amp, you can connect a wire to its input and use it as a signal tracing probe. See if you get any signal on the input and output pins of the op amps, going from left to right in the schematic.

    Check the wiper (center) terminal of the pots. If the wiper is open on any of the pots, it would stop the signal.

    That should get you started...

    Good Luck!
     
  15. sully75

    sully75 TDPRI Member

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    Thanks I'll try that. There's no signal at all whether the switch is off or on.
     
  16. jimdkc

    jimdkc Friend of Leo's

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    Definitely check the jacks and the switch itself... That's all that's in the circuit in bypass mode! Make sure you didn't accidentally ground your input or output jack...
     
  17. sully75

    sully75 TDPRI Member

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    Hmm ok. Pretend like I have no idea what I'm talking about (because I don't): I thought the jacks ground themselves against the case? Don't they make metal to metal contact to the case?
     
  18. sully75

    sully75 TDPRI Member

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    I was unclear what I was supposed to do with the ground holes on the circuit board.
     
  19. jimdkc

    jimdkc Friend of Leo's

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    Your jacks are connected to the case. Your power supply is connected to the PCB. Until you connect the PCB ground to the case, your input and output are not referenced to your power ground.

    You need to run at least one ground wire from your case (or one of the jack sleeve terminals) to a PCB ground pad.

    What I was actually talking about above, however, is to make sure you haven't accidentally grounded one of your TIP connections on your input or output jacks.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2019
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