Charlie Christian

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by EllroyJames, Sep 15, 2016.

  1. EllroyJames

    EllroyJames Friend of Leo's

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    Live At Minton's Playhouse 1941

     
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  2. John Owen

    John Owen Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

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    VERY cool. Thanks for posting.
     
  3. EllroyJames

    EllroyJames Friend of Leo's

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  4. Tony Done

    Tony Done Friend of Leo's

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    CC is one of those I admire greatly rather than like. I once had a look at bebop, but I couldn't get my head around it.
     
  5. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    love that lick at 0:37 in the first one

    and I love how they gave him room to stretch out

    guitar heaven
     
  6. neatone

    neatone Tele-Holic

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    the original..his "electric" guitar playing influenced every kid with a guitar in that era..from jazz to country and western swing...his influence was monumental..had a hendrix type resonance...before that it was still banjo comping/ four to the bar

    (pretty much-there were exceptions of course!)

    this was his mindblower-



    the guitar pickup he used is still called the charlie christian pickup..and probably as popular today (in permutated forms) as ever

    cheers
     
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  7. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    but Charlie wasn't the only one

    there was Django
     
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  8. neatone

    neatone Tele-Holic

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  9. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    where does George Barnes fit in all this?
     
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  10. 24 track

    24 track Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    In Les Paul's personal guitar collection he had Django's Selmer Macaferi , he had over 300 very rare and first of guitars most went up for auction except the really rare ones I would not in the slightest be surprised if he had Charlie's guitar as well.
     
  11. screamin eagle

    screamin eagle Poster Extraordinaire

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    And Eddie Durham. He gave lessons to CC.

    And Carl Cress, George Van Epps, Allen Ruess, Eddie Lang, Teddy Bunn, George Barnes.

    Don't forget that George Barnes recorded with Big Bill Broonzy in Chicago when he was 16.

     
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  12. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

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    It's very interesting to listen to Eddie Lang, the guitarist who was probably the most recorded musician in the 1920s and into the very early thirties. He has prodigious chops and harmonic knowledge and he's a sensitive accompaniest. He has a ready familiarity with the blues. He played with Bessie's smith and Louis Armstrong and really everybody.

    It's obvious he's all about the acoustic guitar. you can hear heavy strings and strong pick attack, short sustain, big full midrange. But he's really twangy and he doesn't swing. He did duets with violinist Joe Venuti where it sounds like Django, kind of. But Django would have been listening to Lang. Lang died of natural causes before the electric Spanish guitar was invented

    Ralph Ellison wrote a nice essay about Charlie Christian, who he grew up with in OK city. He says everybody knew in Jr high that Charlie was great. He also wants to credit the southwest for producing a new sense of swing. Charlie just heard the guitar differently. From everybody else. Listen to Eddie Durham, who was a great musician and arranger and who recorded the pectin guitar before Christian, and you hear Eddie Lang more than Charlie.

    He's got great sense of swing but he builds all his improvs off arpeggiated chords, and once you notice that you start looking for somebody to take it t the next level. But everybody from Barney Kessler to Django to jr barnard with bob wills to t-bone walker to tiny grimes worships at the Christian church
     
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  13. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

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    I've been trying to cop Charlie's sound for a while now. Earlier today i loaded that live at minton's recording into my DAW to do a little frequency analysis
     
  14. adjason

    adjason Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Amazing
     
  15. neatone

    neatone Tele-Holic

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    beautiful thread you started here ej..lots of great names mentioned..but if you read the interviews the one guy that drove the young guitarists crazy was cc...tal farlow, herb ellis, jimmy raney, barney kessel, junior barnard, eldon shamblin, saunders king... etc etc...

    benny goodman had 2 bands goin at the same time..a smaller ensemble with cc..and a larger big band with another 4/4 guitarist...radio broadcasts were as important as records..and thats where a lot of young players first heard cc..radio broadcasts

    he was huge influence.

    not to detract from the others..i mean how could you detract from van epps??

    but...

    cc had electricity on his side..pups,amp and emerging radio

    cheers
     
  16. neatone

    neatone Tele-Holic

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    ps- les paul buried django...when django died broke, it was les that took care of the burial expenses..he loved django,,,theres tales of johnny smith, django and les hangin out when django came stateside

    the best with the best

    cheers
     
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  17. nielsk

    nielsk Tele-Meister

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    the man was a true pioneer, electric amplification opened up new uncharted territory...

    (from wikipedia)
    Christian's solos are frequently referred to as horn-like, and in that sense he was more influenced by horn players such as Lester Young and Herschel Evans than by early acoustic guitarists like Eddie Lang and jazz/bluesman Lonnie Johnson, although they both had contributed to the expansion of the guitar's role from "rhythm section" instrument to a solo instrument. Christian admitted he wanted his guitar to sound like a tenor saxophone.
     
  18. EllroyJames

    EllroyJames Friend of Leo's

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  19. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

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    Barnes to me sounds a lot like Eddie Lang

    Really, Lang was a brilliant guitar player, but the style he worked in ends up being kind of a dead end once amplification comes along

    This is a pretty song, with some dazzle



    and this is more his jazz/blues style




    You can tell it's all about being loud enough--big archtop, sustain sacrificed for volume. I always wonder what Eddie would have done with the electric guitar. He missed it by just a couple years, died of a hemmorage during a tonsilectomy
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2016
  20. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

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    People always say this, and I never hear it. He doesn't sound "like a horn" to me, except he sounds like Lester. But EVERYBODY wanted to sound like Lester. Jazz in the twenties thirties was all about heavy vibrato and a lot of note bending--listen to the lang clip above, "Eddie's Twister." Lots of bending and he's using really heavy strings and lots of vibrato. It was how you signaled "I'm playing blues, Jackson!" Jazz was supposed to be "hot!!" and guitar was supposed to be bendy and twangy. One of the many awesome things abut Lester was he used almost no vibrato and very little heavy handed watch-me-bend-notes stuff. Lester invented cool. Check out this famous solo:




    Minimal vibrato, and the bends are all purposeful. Powerful sense of time and swing. Also he invented the Chuck Berry riff, where you play two notes at different places: check out at 1:28. Lester did this all the time, T-Bone Walker stole it from Lester, Chuck stole it from T-Bone.

    Charlie doesn't do much bending and no vibrato to speak of.




    So I hear Lester in him, but not "horn" if that makes sense. And they're pretty close in age, seven years apart


    I think Charlie played in the Kansas City, Oklahoma City Southwest style, which is what Count Basie played (even thogh he was from NJ) and Lester played in (altho born in New Orleans and raised in Minnesota). Charlie doesn't have that Dixieland thing going on, while Eddie does
     
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