Ceruse finish again - advice needed

Drak

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In doing these kinds of jobs, the wood itself, by Far, is the most important aspect.
You can only enhance what's already there, so the body wood selection and its pore pattern is The most important part of these finishes.
I chose a wood (mine is Red Oak) that had Huge pores and a pattern I liked so I knew I would get an 'in your face' effect.

I've done the same job to Mahogany and it doesn't look anywhere near as pronounced, as the pores are much smaller.
Doing this to Mahogany is what gives you what's called the typical 'doghair' look, because they are usually using Mahogany for those.
With Ash, obviously a different pore pattern again.

That 3-piece body with the grain going in all different directions would not be my first choice for this kind of finish.
But it may very well be perfectly fine for you.

When I did mine, I used the white Timbermate straight out of the can first.
That's when I discovered it had the color of spackle mud, not very white-white, but a subdued light gray, and not at all what I wanted.
Since I had already shot the body black with the two barrier coats and it had dried thoroughly...
And Timbermate is completely water-soluble...

That allowed me to completely and safely remove every last bit of the white filler from the body with just water and a sponge.
Then I found a white additive to make it the bold white I wanted and re-applied.

So that's a way to build in a 'safe reset' point without having to go all the way back to square one if you don't like it as you proceed.
Say...maybe your gold isn't the shade of gold you wanted when it dries and you want to give it another go with a different shade...

By using a water-soluble pore filler that can be easily and safely removed and not disturb the work (which is not water-soluble) under it.
Just a tip...Carry on!
 

PeterUK

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@Drak you're absolutely right and I do have a more suitable body but I'm going to get blooded on this one and see how it comes out.

I'm not into this body for much and I'm going to learn a lot - as I have done so far - so the risk is low and the reward high.

It was actually this body that got my attention (a TDPRI member I believe) so I'm hoping to get similar results.

The grain on my 3-piece is busy but we'll see how it turns out.

I appreciate everyone's help, advice and encouragement.

Thank you. :)
 

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Drak

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That looks like the color of the Timbermate white right out of the can actually...
I wanted something more dramatic.

And that's more of a satin finish, so the two 'go together' really well.
The satin finish and a white that's not pounding you in your face.
Like my bright white goes well with the high gloss.
All the different little parts add up to the final effect.
 

PeterUK

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Beebe

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One way to do it:

1. Rubio Monocoat Precolor Easy in Intense Black
(pretty much just strong black water color paint)


2. Rubio Monocoat Oil + 2C in Charcoal (wood is sealed after this cures)

3. Rubio Monocoat Oil + 2C in Pure with pigment/mica flakes of choice mixed in
(the pigment will stick in the grain)

If you want it glossy, follow that with a coat of shellac then a clear grain filler or just more shellac, sanding every few coats until inequalities are gone. Then add an oil varnish or nitro if you want to alcohol proof it.
 
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IdoFancyGuitar

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PROCESS OVERVIEW
1. Sanding: Select sanding set to sand guitar body and neck until P400 grit,
2. Brushing: Use the provided metallic brush to increase the grain depth,
3. Tint the body in Black: Apply the black dye several time to create an intense coloration of the wood,
4. Sealed: Apply 2 to 3 layer of clear sealer,
5. Mixing grain filler and your color dye: mix the provided grain filler with the selected dye to create a paste that you will apply on the body: it fills the pore of the wood an creates the ceruse effect,
6. Varnish: use the varnish to reveal further the beauty of the wood and protect your guitar.
7. Polishing (optional): Select the polishing kit to get this extra shine and mirror effect for your guitar.

Found it here: https://guitarkitfabric.co.uk/produ...-guitar-kit/translucent-guitar-paint-set.html

Seems they provide all products and userguide... havent try though...

Well it does look fancy!
 




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