Certano or Duesenberg Multibender?

Which bender for a Tele

  • Certano

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  • Multibender

    Votes: 1 100.0%

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    1

tfling

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I’m downsizing lots of gear currently, and in the process grabbing a few “bucket list” guitars. One thing I’ve never owned but always been curious about is a b/g bender.

I’ll probably be buying a Tele specifically for this purpose (currently thinking about the J Mascis sparkle telecaster) but im stuck between these two benders.

The roller bridge on the Duesenberg seems really nice, but I have heard a decent amount of reports of string breakage. You also have to use their mounting plate for the bridge pickup, which adds $80 to the already expensive system. I also don’t love the idea of not being able to keep my brass saddles

The Certano seems like it may have a longer throw based on the design, but I could be totally wrong. Upside is I can use the brass saddles that I love, downside is the guitar has to be drilled

Any help would be greatly appreciated!
 

Silverface

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Have you ever PLAYED a palm - or any - type of bender.

back in the 70's I had a Bigsby palm pedal, and since then I've had several others - some custom made, some of the shelf.

And I can't use them. I use right hand damping near the bridge in combination with bends; bend while playing over the end of the fretboard - basically my right hand is in constant motion to vary attack and tone.

Which is not possible with a palm or arm activated unit. So, if you have not played several styles of benders - palm, arm, hip, several shoulder strap types and so on - I would strongly suggest doing so first.

Test drive before you buy.
 

kLyon

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Have you ever PLAYED a palm - or any - type of bender.

back in the 70's I had a Bigsby palm pedal, and since then I've had several others - some custom made, some of the shelf.

And I can't use them. I use right hand damping near the bridge in combination with bends; bend while playing over the end of the fretboard - basically my right hand is in constant motion to vary attack and tone.

Which is not possible with a palm or arm activated unit. So, if you have not played several styles of benders - palm, arm, hip, several shoulder strap types and so on - I would strongly suggest doing so first.

Test drive before you buy.
I agree. I've got a palm-pedal tele, just because that's what I could afford when I needed to fake steel that I'd played on a record on a tour. And it works and I've grown to like it (or at least the whole package of it and the guitar)... but it really hampers right hand technique and the other kind of bender is a lot better. (Or at least I think it must be a lot better... I've never had one:))
 

BB

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Absolutely SF. I tried the Palm Pedal many (many!) years ago. Like you, I could not do without the palm muting.

I never got along with Bigsby's, Strat trems, Floyds, etc. My buddy had a Wonder Bar installed on his strat and I thought; ool, but what a waste of a great guitar!"

Joining a country band caused me to Look around for a bender option. Turns out, that was the first year Hip Shot introduced their bender.

I bought one of the first ones and had a blast doing faux steel bends....had the B and G bender with the drop D tuner on a homebrew with a tele body, 1/4 LB'r pickups with a Kramer hockey stick shredder neck.

Had a great deal of fun during that period of time and would love to find a simple B-G bender solution.
 

Silverface

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I could afford when I needed to fake steel that I'd played on a record on a tour.

I bought one of the first ones and had a blast doing faux steel bends
Well - personal preference here, but having played benders since the mid 70's (and as advised by Clarence White and Bob Warford) I avoid fake pedal steel like the plaque!

Clarence's advice was to approach the bender with a totally different mindset as soon as you put the strap on - don't play guitar, don't imitate pedal steel - play "6 string B-bender". You can hear the difference between Clarence's early playing on "Fillmore" (with lots of "pedal steely" stuff that just doesn't sound close - and his playing just a few years later, in 'late 71, 72 and 73 up until his death.

He'd stopped playing "chord rhythm" and played riff-based backup that still sounded full, and the bender was FAR outside "pedal steel" licks, or guitar licks. It was a style of its own, and MO worked FAR better than pedal steely walkups or harmonized parts (and I play pedal steel as well).

Even on the original instruction record included with Stringbender installations Warford warns against trying to sound like a cheap steel, abd instead work on the "fluidity" it can bring to your playing.

Just something to think about.
 
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kLyon

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Well - personal preference here, but having played benders since the mid 70's (and as advised by Clarence White and Bob Warford) I avoid fake pedal steel like the plaque!

Clarence's advice was to approach the bender with a totally different mindset as soon as you put the strap on - don't play guitar, don't imitate pedal steel - play "6 string B-bender". You can hear the difference between Clarence's early playing on "Fillmore" (with lots of "pedal steely" stuff that just doesn't sound close - and his playing just a few years later, in 'late 71, 72 and 73 up until his death.

He'd stopped playing "chord rhythm" and played riff-based backup that still sounded full, and the bender was FAR outside "pedal steel" licks, or guitar licks. It was a style of its own, and MO worked FAR better than pedal steely walkups or harmonized parts (and I play pedal steel as well).

Even on the original instruction record included with Stringbender installations Warford warns against trying to sound like a cheap steel, abd instead work on the "fluidity" it can bring to your playing.

Just something to think about.
This was not my situation at all. I produced the record; on it I played parts on pedal steel. They were my parts; I wasn't "faking" pedal steel. I was able to make those parts work better on the b-bender than I could have on a regular guitar or with a slide. (This was made easier by the fact that I'm not a great pedal steel player and they weren't complex parts.)
So I wasn't trying to be a pedal steel player on a different instrument - which I agree would be an exercise in futility - I was a musician playing my own parts in the best way possible for the tour.
 

Silverface

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I produced the record; on it I played parts on pedal steel. They were my parts;
OK I get you.

My only comment is that except for a few tunes that crawled a ways up the Indie charts - and on cover tunes (of MAJOR hits) where it's more or less expected - I never play the same part the same way twice!

As a listener, I don't generally like hearing bands try to regurgitate recordings (hooks, sure - but after those are "set" I prefer improvisation and surprises). I'd say it's just because I'm a guitar player, because of my experience playing in a lot of "jam bands" or because I grew up listening to jazz - except most of the non-musicians I know like hearing bands play things differently.

You could be a complete exception to that due to the style you play, how widely the music is distributed or the audiences you play for - so I'm not criticizing at all; just providing a possibly different "viewpoint/situation".
 

kLyon

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All good; I completely understand. And even in the situation I'm talking about I'm like you most times - I'm not up there to be a record. I agree: there already IS a record. (I always hated jobs where they wanted the exact same thing as the record))
But there were some motifs I would play like the recording on that tour - that made musical sense and were important to the song structure - and some I wouldn't: there was always room for improv (the leader/lead singer in that band is Charlie Haden's son: if anyone appreciates improvisation he does...))
 

dirtminer

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The Certano is excellent- very easy and non-invasive to install (two screw holes and a little grinding on the ashtray to provide string clearance) and flawlessly constructed. I only have had mine for a few months so still getting the hang of it, but I would highly recommend it.
 

tfling

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The Certano is excellent- very easy and non-invasive to install (two screw holes and a little grinding on the ashtray to provide string clearance) and flawlessly constructed. I only have had mine for a few months so still getting the hang of it, but I would highly recommend it.

I totally forgot to update this thread - I got the Certano and have been learning my way around it - I’m super happy with the sounds, and I don’t find that it interferes with my playing for the 1 or 2 licks I use it for
 

JohnnyCrash

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I’ve got a Duesenberg multi on a lapsteel. That I (try to) play more like a pedal steel.

Just built my first b-bender for a Tele, it’s palm lever activated too. For what I’m using it for, the lack of pick hand access for things like palm muting doesn’t bother me, but I completely see how that can be a drag for most people’s bender playing style.

I also really appreciate the passed on advice (from Clarence no less) to play it like it’s its own thing. It can be a big nod in the pedal steel direction (that’s the whole point!), but it’s not going to translate directly to an 8-10 string multi-levered pedal steel.
 




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