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Century-old, repurposed beam bodies

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by OmalleyJr, Oct 3, 2020.

  1. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    I'm all for re-cycling and giving an old chunk of wood a new life :).

    The old wood is often a pretty good grade, especially when compared to the stuff sold today as framing lumber.


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  2. Peegoo

    Peegoo Poster Extraordinaire

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    I agree 100%, Ron. That's why I wrote, "buy the guitar; don't buy the snake oil."
     
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  3. PimR

    PimR TDPRI Member

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    i also like recycling ... for my tele i made a body of irokko .. it was a step of the stairs of a school. the neck is made of wenge and was part of a door from another school

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    this top is a used piece of aluminium.. the pickguard is a piece of my old wachingmachine....

    [​IMG]


    this one has a top of a crate from a local brewery.. (nice beer BTW)

    [​IMG]
     
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  4. jvin248

    jvin248 Doctor of Teleocity

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    .

    The important bit of old wood used in a guitar is ... have a good story to tell.

    That's it.

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  5. RogerC

    RogerC Poster Extraordinaire

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    ^This.

    Since people know I build guitars, I'm often asked, "What's the best wood to build a guitar from?" My reply is, "Whatever wood inspires you to play." If having a cool story inspires you to pick up your guitar and play or write new songs, then that's a great guitar for you. If having something exotic inspires you, then that's the best wood for your guitar.
     
  6. whodatpat

    whodatpat Friend of Leo's

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    I made this body and neck out of a pine timber that came out of a 100+ year old barn in Gettysburg. It sounds great with nice sustain, like just about any other wood I could have used. But what made this wood freakin awesome is that it was free.

    1009878_522727721138418_1941554653_n.jpg
     
  7. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    Love it! makes me smile
     
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  8. fenderchamp

    fenderchamp Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    how did you bond the aluminum top to the body, and do you have pictures of the process, and would you mind sharing some close ups of the transition. I love that guitar, it's damn tuff.
     
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  9. droliver

    droliver TDPRI Member

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    Old wood on a solid body electric is almost exclusively a cosmetic appointment.
     
  10. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    or a sentimental one

    I think Roger's statement about what wood to use to build a guitar is the gold standard, because if it doesn't inspire you to play . . .
     
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  11. mrblanche

    mrblanche TDPRI Member

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    I was going to say that. My wife worked at a pine mill in Arkansas, and when we built our cabin, we used what they called "dense" wood. That is essentially old growth trees that have their annual rings very small and close together.

    I just sold the timber off 20 of our 26 acres around that cabin. When we bought that land 35 years ago, there wasn't a tree on it you couldn't see over. Nothing taller than 4 feet. I didn't realize how much the trees had grown, but we had trees approaching 30 inches in diameter and 80 feet tall. In 35 years. And it all went to saw lumber. 1,226 tons of logs. That's 2,452,000 lbs of wood. Yes, these were supposedly "superior" trees, planted by International paper 40 years ago. But the growth rings were very wide, and this stuff definitely fell in the category of "softwood."
     
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  12. pshupe

    pshupe Tele-Meister

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    Old growth wasn't necessarily all better or denser wood. It depended on the growing conditions as well. It's more important to think of old growth as the first cutting in a forested area. This could have happened 200 yrs ago in some areas. Anything planted after that in that area would not be considered old growth even though it may have been planted 200 yrs ago. The idea is the trees were not planted by man in an open field. Growing naturally in a forest and in northern climates would force the trees to grow more slowly. There also could be other factors that would produce very dense tight grained wood. You cannot make a business plan today where you plant trees somewhere and then wait 50 - 100 yrs to harvest them. Managed forests may use certain methods to help with that but most softwood would be classified as rapidly renewable which means harvested about 10 - 15 yrs after planting. The larger the trees get in that time span the more wood you get. This is the opposite of what some wood workers want. That is why it is sought after wood. The only option for this type of wood these days is reclaimed or sinker wood.

    Cheers Peter.
     
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  13. John E

    John E Friend of Leo's

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    Yeah I played a Taylor Sinker wood a few years ago when they had a run. It was beautiful but I had no idea what it was. I picked up and strummed it.... and was like.... hominahominahominahomi.... The tone was mind blowing. I had to have it.... I asked how much? $6500. And I was like hominahominahominahomi....

    Needless to say, I don't own a sinker wood guitar... lol
     
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  14. Maguchi

    Maguchi Tele-Holic

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    Not sure if you're kidding or not. The nice thing about sustain is you can turn it off when not needed. Whereas, while you can add sustain electronically, it is much harder to add to a lack of sustain than to limit sustain that is present in a guitar.
     
  15. DeepDangler

    DeepDangler Tele-Meister

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    My number one tele is a century old pine body. It sounds good and resonates like crazy. I love the instrument but pine has its quirks. I would argue the sustain is less than a typical ash tele or other dense quality wood slab. It almost sounds like a semi hollow. It has a bit more power when you strum hard from what I’ve noticed. These differences are extremely subtle though. Mine was less than a grand from Bob Logan’s shop. The wood is good but it’s just a slightly different character and certainly not worth 5k.
     

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  16. papa32203

    papa32203 Tele-Afflicted

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    Not here in Phoenix!
     
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  17. otterhound

    otterhound Poster Extraordinaire

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    I have a bunch of bookmatched and quartersawn Norway Spruce billets here . Isn't this the wood that Stradivarius built Violins from ? Picea Abies , to be specific . There are some pitch pockets , but I have termed them as tone pockets . Hey , this could be fun . I can look just north from my house and see where the tree grew . In fact , there are still sections of it lying in the yard . It is the old Pinkerton place . Who knows , I may even carve a few necks from this wood .
     
  18. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

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    The Stradivarius spruce came from the Fiemme Valley in the Italian Alps. IIRC it's called Red Spruce. 60 Minutes did a great story a few years back on the town of Cremona where they were made and violins are still made there today. Interesting stuff..
     
  19. Lacking Talent

    Lacking Talent Tele-Holic

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    I have nothing to add this discussion other than, "Man, was that good!"
     
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  20. CalebAaron666

    CalebAaron666 Tele-Holic

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    I have a custom built guitar made by a local luthier here in Portland, Maine.

    The body is made of 200+ year old pine salvaged from what was the first stage coach stop in the state on the road from Boston to Portland.

    I love this guitar. It’s under 7 lbs, and packs great tone coupled with a fat Warmoth neck featuring stainless steel frets, and Pickup Wizard Broadcaster pickups.

    159F2E78-335A-4030-8117-4FA6EC23C13E.jpeg 318EEC47-03D7-4EA4-BC71-EACB1F9EB2F0.jpeg
     
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