Capo Question

PastorJay

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I never use a capo when playing electric, but do sometimes on acoustic.

Last week I played mandolin at a church conference and used a capo on some songs (don't judge me :)) because while the chords move easily I like being able to use the open strings if playing in D, G, or A.

The capo I use on mandolin is actually a banjo capo that slides up over the nut when not in use so I never have to take it on or off. And it doesn't affect the tuning, like a Kyser clamp-style capo sometimes does. I'd like to get one for guitar.

Several companies make this style capo for guitar, including Paige, G7th "Heritage," Elliot, the D'Addario "Cadle Capo" and the Shubb "Fine Tune". I've seen several of those discussed here, but not an answer to my particular question.

Is there a reason other than price to buy one of these brands or models as opposed to one of the others?

Thanks.

X-posted to worship service players forum.
 

telestratosonic

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Kyser capos are made in the USA (Texas). I have one for acoustic guitar. It's well-made and functions nicely. Kyser has recently come out with an electric-guitar capo that fits a Fender 9.5 radius. I'm going to buy one for use with my Telecaster. I have an older made-in-USA Shubb but they have since moved their production offshore. I haven't come across any made-in-Canada capos so I'll stick with made-in-USA capos and specifically Kyser capos. But that's just me.
 

G Stone496

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I never use a capo when playing electric, but do sometimes on acoustic.

Last week I played mandolin at a church conference and used a capo on some songs (don't judge me :)) because while the chords move easily I like being able to use the open strings if playing in D, G, or A.

The capo I use on mandolin is actually a banjo capo that slides up over the nut when not in use so I never have to take it on or off. And it doesn't affect the tuning, like a Kyser clamp-style capo sometimes does. I'd like to get one for guitar.

Several companies make this style capo for guitar, including Paige, G7th "Heritage," Elliot, the D'Addario "Cadle Capo" and the Shubb "Fine Tune". I've seen several of those discussed here, but not an answer to my particular question.

Is there a reason other than price to buy one of these brands or models as opposed to one of the others?

Thanks.

X-posted to worship service players forum.
What’s a capo?
 

oregomike

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I never use a capo when playing electric, but do sometimes on acoustic.

Last week I played mandolin at a church conference and used a capo on some songs (don't judge me :)) because while the chords move easily I like being able to use the open strings if playing in D, G, or A.

The capo I use on mandolin is actually a banjo capo that slides up over the nut when not in use so I never have to take it on or off. And it doesn't affect the tuning, like a Kyser clamp-style capo sometimes does. I'd like to get one for guitar.

Several companies make this style capo for guitar, including Paige, G7th "Heritage," Elliot, the D'Addario "Cadle Capo" and the Shubb "Fine Tune". I've seen several of those discussed here, but not an answer to my particular question.

Is there a reason other than price to buy one of these brands or models as opposed to one of the others?

Thanks.

X-posted to worship service players forum.
I have quite a few different Shubb's which I like, but live, I almost always turn to the Kyser low-tension capo. It's just too easy to use, and if it's good enough for Emmanuel...
 

uriah1

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I have them all.
Some would knock a string out of tune.
For ease and speed I use Daddario capo too.
 

Chiogtr4x

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I just use Kysers on any electric and acoustic- love the one-hand operation at gigs, and keep the capo clamped on mic stand.

I rotate the little clear rubber pad on the back bar so the thin side of pad faces neck- this widens span of capo just a bit- reducing a little clamp pressure

But I have no issues with these if I place directly behind fret- no gap
 

RomanS

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@PastorJay The type of capo you mean is called a "yoke style capo" - and apparently nobody else on this thread understood that, because they all keep recommending other types of capo.
The only yoke style capo I own is the basic Paige model, and I'm perfectly happy with that one (though I do lust after a Kat Eyz yoke style cope - for the only reason that they look cool).
 

BluegrassPicker

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I'd like to add a comment in this thread for those who are making a decision on their capo purchases: Shubb stands 100% behind their products.

Not long ago, a Shubb "fine tune" $70 capo that was gifted to me years ago by a friend developed a problem with the screw. I called Shubb and explained that I received it as a gift and asked the rep how I could fix the problem. He told me that gift or not, they wanted all their users to be happy and so he'd send me a new replacement and a prepaid mailer to send my old one back. I asked while he's at it to send me a spring for my banjo capo that I've been using for ages and a couple of the sleeves and I offered to give my CC number to cover those costs. He said don't worry about it. I thanked him for the great customer service.

A few days later I received everything in the mail and I promptly sent in the old capo back to them.

The new "fine tune" capo works beautifully and my banjo capo is now like new.

IMO great customer service incidents need to be told and re-told since many times it is rare nowadays.

I've always liked their capos and have bought several in the past, but now I'm a lifetime fan of Shubb and their company, and in disclosure I must say that I have absolutely no financial or other ties to them other than from my purchases.

Thank you Shubb for your great customer service.

BluegrassPicker
 

ahiddentableau

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I've tried quite a few and I think most any of them are fine so long as the radius is reasonably close and the pressure is adjustable. The only ones I've had any trouble with are the really cheap 60s style thing with the 3 slots and a Kyser that put too much pressure on the strings (I use 9s which is probably a part of the problem--doesn't take much to pull those out of tune). The D'addario/Planet Waves with the screw and the G7 performance are the ones I use atm and they are both fine. You should also keep in mind that using a capo can be very hard on fretwire. Especially if you're playing an electric like an electric (bends etc) it can chew it up like nothing else.

tl;dr - not really. So long as the radius is close enough and you can adjust the pressure on the strings you're good to go.
 

telestratosonic

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I just use Kysers on any electric and acoustic- love the one-hand operation at gigs, and keep the capo clamped on mic stand.

I rotate the little clear rubber pad on the back bar so the thin side of pad faces neck- this widens span of capo just a bit- reducing a little clamp pressure

But I have no issues with these if I place directly behind fret- no gap
Interesting and food for thought. Thanks!
 

Chiogtr4x

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Interesting and food for thought. Thanks!

I know that my intonation is not perfect with my Kyser capos
- if I put one on any guitar (acoustic or electric) then look at a headstock tuner, I can see that pitch on ALL strings is a few cents sharper, than if I were to fret note with my finger...but since all strings are 'uniformly sharp' - I live with it! ( I don't play perfectly either)- often I'm just playing (only) with bass, or bass+drums.

I'd love one of those Page or Elliot Bluegrass capos ( the thin metal bar ones that has almost perfect intonation, and stores behind the nut) but I'm not spending more than $15-20 on a capo.
I have a Bluegrass collector friend, that loves to spend $$- $135 on a capo!

( my first ones in the '70's were the $2.00, double- elastic band ones, " and we liked it!")
 

telestratosonic

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I know that my intonation is not perfect with my Kyser capos
- if I put one on any guitar (acoustic or electric) then look at a headstock tuner, I can see that pitch on ALL strings is a few cents sharper, than if I were to fret note with my finger...but since all strings are 'uniformly sharp' - I live with it! ( I don't play perfectly either)- often I'm just playing (only) with bass, or bass+drums.

I'd love one of those Page or Elliot Bluegrass capos ( the thin metal bar ones that has almost perfect intonation, and stores behind the nut) but I'm not spending more than $15-20 on a capo.
I have a Bluegrass collector friend, that loves to spend $$- $135 on a capo!

( my first ones in the '70's were the $2.00, double- elastic band ones, " and we liked it!")
Never heard of Elliot or Page capos but will check them out. Thanks. With me, it depends on my mood whether I'll tweak the tuning with a capo on or not. If I'm recording myself, I'll tweak the tuning. However, I prefer the sound of an acoustic without a capo. I have three acoustics. One is tuned to Concert C (EBGDAE) , another a half step lower (EbBbGbABEb) and the other a full step lower (DAFCGD). I like to sing in the keys of G, C, or D.
But in the meantime, the search goes on for a capo that makes the guitar sound as if there's no capo being used. Lol..
 

timbgtr

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+1 on Shubb except for one thing—you can’t leave them on the guitar, e.g., by clamping it on the headstock when not using it. For me, that’s an invitation to lose it. So each of my acoustics gets its own Kyser or Dunlop, left on the headstock when not in use.

I never use one on electrics, but I'm also not much of a singer. If I were, I might.
 

schmee

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Some capos work well on some necks and some dont. I have 3 Shubb capos, they dont work well on Fender electrics at all. The Kyser works great.
Go figger, fortunately I rarely use one on electrics except messing around at home.
 

BluegrassPicker

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I use a capo all the time on my acoustics when playing Bluegrass and most Country tunes to get the powerful open string ringing sound.

I never use a capo on my Tele. The dude I bought my first electric guitar from years ago used to be a pro bar gig electric country style player. He told me when I bought the guitar to never use a capo because I'd never learn to play up the neck in any key if I did. The capo would always be a crutch that I'd fall back on. IMO for myself, he was absolutely correct. Through the electric playing years I've learned to play just about any song that I put my ears to in any key at any position up and down the neck using CAGED patterns and some scale forms. It's easy on the Tele, but more challenging on the acoustic to pull out the volume so out comes the capo for that purpose most of the time. Playing without the capo on the banjo and resonator has helped me learn the neck on those instruments as well.

I've passed the no capo on an electric advice (and no capo on acoustic just to learn the neck) to many beginning and not so beginning players and that has been received well with good results.

But definitely to each his own and YMMV and just my personal 2 pennies.

BTW, the Shubb "fine tune" and the Paige Original and other models store above the nut which is an absolute necessity for me.

One other thing to mention, I don't use the Shubb black soft sleeves on my Shubbs and use a vinyl sleeve like what used to come on the Shubbs. To my ears, I get a clearer more distinct and focused tone with they vinyl and a very slightly mellower sound from the black sleeve. I want a clear, strong and powerful Bluegrass banjo busting sound out of my acoustic. I asked the Shubb rep about that and he said that the vinyl was nothing proprietary and if that was preferred as it is for some people, that a suitable size vinyl tubing from Home Depot or Lowes would be the same thing.

BluegrassPicker
 




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