Capo question

PastorJay

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I never use a capo when playing electric, but do sometimes on acoustic.

Last week I played mandolin at a church conference and used a capo on some songs (don't judge me :)) because while the chords move easily I like being able to use the open strings if playing in D, G, or A.

The capo I use on mandolin is actually a banjo capo that slides up over the nut when not in use so I never have to take it on or off. And it doesn't affect the tuning, like a Kyser clamp-style capo sometimes does. I'd like to get one for guitar.

Several companies make this style capo for guitar, including Paige, G7th "Heritage," Elliot, the D'Addario "Cadle Capo" and the Shubb "Fine Tune".

Is there a reason other than price to buy one of these brands or models as opposed to one of the others?

Thanks.

X-posted to acoustic guitar forum.
 

Danjabellza

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One with adjustable tension is “better” the spring clamp kinds can provide excess wear on frets. I have the shubb, and it’s great. I use it on electric and acoustic. (I don’t use a capo much, but I’ve ditched all the others since I got the shubb)
 

hotraman

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I use a Shubb banjo capo when needed. And I use it with my mandolin, too. Its different of course, but the audience really doesn't care. As long as you play "in tune."
 

budglo

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I use a G7 capo on my electrics. My broadcaster gets a Shubb made especially for a 7.25 radius . Both work really good . Agreed that you need one with adjustable tension on electrics.
 

telepraise

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The premium capos you list are great on acoustic guitar, not necessary for electric where string tension is way lower.

Among serious bluegrass players, the Elliot is the gold standard and totally reliable so the pros who make their living on a flattop all use one. The G7th Heritage is one notch down (I own one) and their ART technology is really helpful if your guitar is compound radius (my Bourgeois is). Both of those capos are north of $150 because they are handmade in small one-man size shops.

If your guitar is a straight radius, Shubb capos are bomb proof and many players have used the same one for decades. The secret to all capos is to set them right up against the fret so the strings aren't stretched, and of course- to only use the amount of tension necessary to get it to fret cleanly.
 

scooteraz

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I really like G7th capos. The adjustable tension is in your fingers (well in the the performance models). I haven’t tried the banjo model on a mandolin, but I’m guessing it would work. I may try later this week and let you know.

OTOH, they are expensive. My old tried and true are Schubbs, and they work fine. And less expensive than the G7th.

I personally have never liked the sliding capos. Just me and my preferences.
 

ravindave_3600

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My buddy uses Paige on his 2 Martins and always sounds good. He swears by them and since they're only $30 I'm going to pick one up.
 

Rene Asologuitar

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I have a bunch of Kyser Capos laying around, and in my guitar cases.
I use the capo all the time.
Tuning can be altered by the capo if positioned too close to the fret, especially on the bass strings.
I have no issues with Kyser.
All capos will alter tuning, one has to know how to use the capo properly, and to double check tuning, if possible.
 

PastorJay

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The premium capos you list are great on acoustic guitar, not necessary for electric where string tension is way lower.

Among serious bluegrass players, the Elliot is the gold standard and totally reliable so the pros who make their living on a flattop all use one. The G7th Heritage is one notch down (I own one) and their ART technology is really helpful if your guitar is compound radius (my Bourgeois is). Both of those capos are north of $150 because they are handmade in small one-man size shops.

If your guitar is a straight radius, Shubb capos are bomb proof and many players have used the same one for decades. The secret to all capos is to set them right up against the fret so the strings aren't stretched, and of course- to only use the amount of tension necessary to get it to fret cleanly.
This was very helpful. I ordered a G7th Heritage. It has arrived. Now I can try it out.
 

Tele-beeb

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I like the Kyser… I place it right on the fret, directly before the crown (nut side.) It doesn’t affect tuning that way.
 

SlimGrady

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Paige, Daddario, Shubb, G7th

They all work well (I have used all) as long as you don't use too much tension.

Not a fan of the kyser really but can make it work too in a pinch
 

ravindave_3600

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Got just enough Christmas money to buy a couple of essentials and have $20 left over. I invested that in a Shubb S1 which works really well on my acoustics. Don't really know when to use it, and haven't tried it on my teles, but so far it's a good buy.
 




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