capo oops!

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Meltinpix, Sep 1, 2004.

  1. Meltinpix

    Meltinpix TDPRI Member

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    If I play an open g chord with the capo at the third fret what does that chord become?
    TIA,
    Meltnpix6
     
  2. Jakedog

    Jakedog Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Bee flat.
     
  3. Meltinpix

    Meltinpix TDPRI Member

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    thanks

    I thought it was A#.
    Meltinpix6
     
  4. FMA

    FMA Poster Extraordinaire

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    Both wrong

    It's a B.
     
  5. Jakedog

    Jakedog Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    DOH!!! You're absolutely right. I will go hide under somthing now. :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops:
     
  6. Horrorshow

    Horrorshow Tele-Meister

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    Re: Both wrong

    Bingo!
     
  7. soma5

    soma5 Tele-Holic

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    Applying a capo is like adding frets to your chord. If you add three frets to G, you go from G to Ab (1 fret) to A (2 frets) to Bb (three frets). A# is another way of saying it. Every fret adds one half-step on the scale, or one increment along the chromatic scale.

    It is very useful for guitarists to learn (at a minimum) the names of all the notes on the A and low E strings. That way you can identify the root notes of most of the chords you play.
     
  8. weelie

    weelie Friend of Leo's

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    Re: Both wrong

    ?! Three frets higher than G is a B?! Is this trick question?

    This is how I see it:
    Open chord have their roots on the lowest (thickest) string played. So an open G will have the note G on the 6th string as does a E-chord shaped barre G at the 2rd fret. So if you play a E-shape barre on the sixth fret, you have a Bb chord, which is the same as A#.

    (I guess *YMMV* applies here too :D )
     
  9. Meltinpix

    Meltinpix TDPRI Member

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    A#

    It's actually an A#.
     
  10. thrasher

    thrasher Tele-Holic

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    B flat A sharp - same thing.
     
  11. rcrecelius

    rcrecelius Tele-Holic

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    This reminds me of a funny story...
    A friend of mine had been working in Bransom at one of the shows and they had a female guest singer that was apparently not very good. During rehearsal, the bandleader asked her what key she wanted the song in...to which she replied "B flat". The bandleader turned around and told the band "play it in B boys, she'll flat it herself !"
     
  12. ashtray

    ashtray Tele-Holic

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    Let's see: we're in the key of G Major. 3 half steps up from G in the scale is: G (root), A (full step), Bb (half step - flat 3rd). So the answer is B flat. It's not really in the key of G Major - so it could be an accidental if we were talking about notes - but this is more of a transpose - well, really notation. It's called "open G" tuning - but when you move positions, it has nothing to do with the key of G.

    So both A# and Bb Major are correct answers to the name of the chord being played.
     
  13. FMA

    FMA Poster Extraordinaire

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    Sorry I brought it up...

    OK, the root of a G chord is on the third fret on the low E string. Move the root up four frets and its the seventh fret of the low E string, a B.
    Another way to look at it -- your D, G and B strings form the triad of the G major chord -- in order, your fifth, root and third. Moving it up four frets gives you the major triad of the B chord...
    The problem, I think, is your counting frets as steps. Some frets are half steps and some are whole steps, depending on the scale...
    So, long story short, the answer is an open G chord played with the guitar capoed at the fourth fret is a B...
     
  14. FMA

    FMA Poster Extraordinaire

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    Mea culpa

    I thought he wrote fourth fret...
    My fault. Capoed at the third fret is a B flat.
    My apologies and I will perform 100 pentatonic minor scales for penance!
     
  15. Meltinpix

    Meltinpix TDPRI Member

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    yes

    I did say that but I made a mistake and changed it to what I was asking.
     
  16. bender72

    bender72 Tele-Holic

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    If you played with a capo that frets all of the strings on the third fret and struck an open G Chord, that would not be a B, that would be an A# or Bb. Strick a barred B chord than one in this position and you will hear that they are not the same chord. Hope this helps 8)
     
  17. ashtray

    ashtray Tele-Holic

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    Clarification

    Each fret is a half step on the guitar. Scales are made up of intervals of half and whole steps. For example, a major scale is: WWHWWWH W=Whole Step, H= Half Step.

    Since "G" is 3 frets up from open E, Bb is 3 frets up from G.
     
  18. soma5

    soma5 Tele-Holic

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    I hope it's not too obnoxious to quote from my own post above. I (obviously) think it's an important statement.

    There is no need or room for debate. The question is, "What is the note at the 6th fret of either E string?" As Chris S. points out, it is Bb. As he also pointed out, this is enharmonically equivalent to A#.
     
  19. ashtray

    ashtray Tele-Holic

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    I DISAGREE! Oh wait, no I don't. Nevermind. :lol:
     
  20. FMA

    FMA Poster Extraordinaire

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    Excuse me

    I don't know what I was thinking, maybe scale intervals or something else. Need more coffee...
     
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