Can you afford to live here?

Tonetele

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n our area, a 1/4 acre lot with a 2400 square foot, four bedroom, two story colonial home in a good neighborhood with good schools can be had for less than $300,000.
That would be easily be between 1-2 mlliion $$s here or in any major city , eve a good rural place.
Mortgage rates have never been lower here so prices are high, availability rare.
 

BigDaddyLH

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Too little info to draw a meaningful conclusion.

We have areas packed with hundreds of multi-million dollar mansions with thousands of houses over half a million in neighborhoods surrounding those mansion neighborhoods.

The map says $59k a year is what someone needs to make here.

It's not a good piece of information by itself.

I doubt any conclusions drawn from it are any good.

Still. Over 200 replies in this thread so far.
 

buster poser

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Ha I wish

Median home price here is north of $600k

GL with your $540k mortgage on $54k a year lol. “State average,” come on now
 

Addnine

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I'll do pretty much anything to avoid living in a city. My town: population 300. That's about as urban as I can live with.
 

sax4blues

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State numbers are meaningless as the geographic area is way too big. There are towns where houses are 1/2 the state average and towns where houses are 10x the state average.
 

kuch

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I didn't read all of the responses so this might be redundant, it's an old thread.

the chart also doesn't address the average/median salaries in the individual states. I do know this applies to most of Wa state at least that average salaries are higher here than in some of the states with lower salary requirements for housing.
 

Yesyoudidyouare

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TBH I dont know how ANYONE can afford to live in Ca, literally anyone, besides the homeless.

Maybe you are all doctors? Or rich?
 

Nubs

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I would guess this is somewhat accurate. I lived in TX for the past 10 years and now I'm in MD. The cost of living here is definitely higher than TX.
 

Skyhook

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:lol:

thread_shut_down.png
 

Festofish

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I guess it's no coincidence that most of the green areas are dumps.
Overgeneralization is a big problem in America. I absolutely love this dump called Michigan. A state with two peninsulas connected by a 5 mile suspension bridge(the longest in the US). It’s surrounded by the Great Lakes, islands and filled with woodlands and wetlands. It is no dump.
 

chris m.

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Overgeneralization is a big problem in America. I absolutely love this dump called Michigan. A state with two peninsulas connected by a 5 mile suspension bridge(the longest in the US). It’s surrounded by the Great Lakes, islands and filled with woodlands and wetlands. It is no dump.
The main drawback is long, cold winters. And less jobs, though remote work may help on that front. Maybe as the climate changes it will become a climate refuge. OTOH ice fishing and outdoor ice skating will become less likely.
 

imwjl

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Overgeneralization is a big problem in America. I absolutely love this dump called Michigan. A state with two peninsulas connected by a 5 mile suspension bridge(the longest in the US). It’s surrounded by the Great Lakes, islands and filled with woodlands and wetlands. It is no dump.
The main drawback is long, cold winters. And less jobs, though remote work may help on that front. Maybe as the climate changes it will become a climate refuge. OTOH ice fishing and outdoor ice skating will become less likely.
As long as Boho remains a dump overall, and gets dumped on early and often. I suggest the beginning of the video if only for the song.

For the overall threads, metro areas skew matters in the original post's graphic, and it is not that hard to participate in a better life. My observations have been the prosperous areas prove the rising tide lifts all ships cliche. For the California stereotypes I often think about having family and friends who are both professional and blue collar. The blue collar skills have made a decent living for all of them. The commutes some do are not much different than I catch people do in my region to benefit from the very prosperous counties and metro areas.

In defense of MI.

 

getbent

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As long as Boho remains a dump overall, and gets dumped on early and often. I suggest the beginning of the video if only for the song.

For the overall threads, metro areas skew matters in the original post's graphic, and it is not that hard to participate in a better life. My observations have been the prosperous areas prove the rising tide lifts all ships cliche. For the California stereotypes I often think about having family and friends who are both professional and blue collar. The blue collar skills have made a decent living for all of them. The commutes some do are not much different than I catch people do in my region to benefit from the very prosperous counties and metro areas.

In defense of MI.


When I lived in Colorado, I'll bet every 3rd person I worked with was from Michigan. Growing up in California, maybe 1 out of 5 people I knew had parents born in California. People in the united states move around, it seems.
 

imwjl

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When I lived in Colorado, I'll bet every 3rd person I worked with was from Michigan. Growing up in California, maybe 1 out of 5 people I knew had parents born in California. People in the united states move around, it seems.
More recently and now, associates (cousins, friends, brother in law, his kids) in CA point out their having lots of work associates in blue collar jobs all making ends meet or thriving because areas with high paid professionals still need skilled workers in other areas.

A quite a while ago observation with some recent evidence (family, work associates) is CO has pockets that stream folks from other areas. It is not just ski areas. One of my tech reps transferred to the front range from IL, says his neighborhood seems full of upper midwest transplants. Landlord cousins in front range and Summit County see that.

Beyond attractions like sports or jobs, there seems to be exits from places that stink by a lot of measures. Some publications I generally read had articles on where people are moving. Bass ackwards places stood out as areas of exodus. In my state the modern culture wars create some fear to move to my prosperous county so some move farther away if not stay in a rural poor life.
 

Festofish

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The main drawback is long, cold winters. And less jobs, though remote work may help on that front. Maybe as the climate changes it will become a climate refuge. OTOH ice fishing and outdoor ice skating will become less likely.
Less jobs than what? Sure there’s cold weather but very few creepy crawlers to watch out for. We have 1 spider and 1 snake that are poisonous and they aren’t overly abundant. Im not even outdoorsy and I love it.
 




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