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Can I Wrap Recently Nitro'd Guitar in Blanket?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Dr Chim Richalds, Feb 10, 2021.

  1. Dr Chim Richalds

    Dr Chim Richalds TDPRI Member

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    I'm currently spraying some tinted nitro lacquer in my garage. In NJ right now it is really cold, so I have a space heater running and spraying with a respirator on. I plan to spray my last coat tonight and leave the guitar in the heated garage until tomorrow to dry.

    I don't want to ruin the lacquer I just sprayed taking the guitar from the warm-ish garage into my house (it's a detached garage) by carrying it through the cold. I recently made this mistake by taking a different guitar from warm into the cold and it instantly developed several crack lines where I'm assuming the finish quickly shrunk when the cold air hit it.

    My question is: can I loosely wrap the guitar in a soft blanket for the short trip so it doesn't get shocked by the cold? I plan on letting it hang in the garage for at least 12 hours after the last coat. Or should I wait longer before wrapping it? OR would it be better to just turn the space heater off and let the temperature in the garage slowly fall, and then once the garage is cool/cold, carry the guitar sans-blanket through the cold for a few seconds into the warm house?
     
  2. Informal

    Informal Tele-Afflicted

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    I wouldn't... Unless you're fond of the texture on the blanket.
     
  3. Danb541

    Danb541 Friend of Leo's

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    Is your garage a quarter mile from your house or something? Just run.
     
  4. Danb541

    Danb541 Friend of Leo's

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    Seriously though, after 12 hours of drying a blanket should be fine as long as it's not tacky, and it shouldn't be.
     
  5. Boreas

    Boreas Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Welcome aboard!

    Why not just use a guitar case? That way if you slip on the ice and fall on your face it may be protected a little better.
     
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  6. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Poster Extraordinaire

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    Leave it in the garage to dry. Leave the heater on. Why would you want solvents evaporating in your home?
     
  7. clayfeat

    clayfeat Tele-Afflicted

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    I would use an electric blanket.
     
  8. NC E30

    NC E30 TDPRI Member

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    I second the advice to leave it in the garage. Those solvents will outgas for quite some time, and you don't want to be breathing those fumes.
     
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  9. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    Wait until the temperature and RH are both conducive to finishing (60+ F and less than 60% or whatever it says on your cans). You've put a lot of time into the guitar, don't screw it up by being impatient.
     
  10. MrCairo46

    MrCairo46 Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    Don’t
    Believe me don’t
     
  11. Dr Chim Richalds

    Dr Chim Richalds TDPRI Member

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    Thanks all. I’m concluding from all responses this far to just let it gas out in the garage... how long though since the last coat?
     
  12. Dr Chim Richalds

    Dr Chim Richalds TDPRI Member

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    Also, can I go straight into clear coats if its lacquer? or should the color coat (tineted lacquer) cure?
     
  13. sleazy pot pie

    sleazy pot pie Tele-Afflicted Gold Supporter

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    You can go right to it. Lacquer is lacquer, regardless of pigment is added or not.
     
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  14. Dr Chim Richalds

    Dr Chim Richalds TDPRI Member

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    I think it came out awesome
     

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  15. Peegoo

    Peegoo Poster Extraordinaire

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    Nce work!

    That is true. But like Freeman mentioned above, follow the instructions for temperature and humidity specified by the manufacturer. Don't shoot finish outside those parameters because you may end up wasting time and materials and have to redo it. Be patient, and allow the finish to cure within those same parameters.

    Many builders will say two weeks to cure after final coat is sufficient prior to wet sanding and polishing. This is true only if you allow each coat to set hard before the next coat.

    If you allow a previous coat to just flash off and then hit it with the next, it can take longer than two weeks to cure after the final coat because more solvents are trapped under the finish. The solvents permeate the wood and it takes longer for them to escape through a topcoat that's trying to set hard. This is one of the reasons you read about a builder getting a perfect mirror-like shine after polishing and then a month later there are sanding marks appearing in the finish.

    Just like when shooting finish, "warm and dry" are ideal conditions for nitro to cure. Two weeks is good. Three is better. A month is even better.
     
  16. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    To elaborate on what PeeGoo just said, different brands of lacquer will give different drying schedules. We have a professional finisher on this forum who insists that true nitrocellulose lacquer requires very little dry time but that some manufacturers add solvents which extend that time. In particular he says the StewMac products have naphtha which significantly extends the time you should let them dry.

    I have shot both StewMac and several other brands of lacquer, both rattle cans and with a gun. When I first started I read Dan Erlewine's book and he recommends 2 to 3 weeks of drying time (he is also associated with SM) and that is what I have always used with every product. I've never had problems except for the one time when the humidity was too high (I knew it) and I got blushing that eventually required a complete refinish

    Here is the SM schedule, follow it and mind the temp and RH and you will have no problems

    https://www.stewmac.com/video-and-i...repair/nitrocellulose-finishing-schedule.html
     
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  17. Dr Chim Richalds

    Dr Chim Richalds TDPRI Member

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    The rattle cans I used were StewMac.

    the problem I have now is that I’m using a neighbors heater in the garage that I need to return, so I either leave it in a cold garage or I bring it into my basement. Either way it’s going to get cold.

    I want to prevent the lacquer from completely splitting from the temperature change, so do I let it gradually get cold or is it dry enough at this point to loosely drape a jacket over it and carry it into the house?
     
  18. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    Sure you can :).

    It's not like your strapping the blanket on with banding clamps.

    What kind of lacquer are you using?

    edit: Don't mind the question, I just saw you're using SM rattle-cans.
    .
     
  19. jackal

    jackal Friend of Leo's Platinum Supporter

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    Don't know how to handle it, but that sure is sweet looking!
     
  20. Dr Chim Richalds

    Dr Chim Richalds TDPRI Member

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    I brought it in, all is well - she's now hanging in a corner of my basement while Mohawk Precat Gloss Laquer is on its way for the clear coats.

    Thanks to all who replied!
     
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