Can an ash body and maple neck REALLY make this much difference?

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by DHart, Feb 10, 2019.

  1. JodanOrNoDan

    JodanOrNoDan Tele-Meister

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    I can relate to this. You have to learn to listen. It is very hard to convince someone something is there when they cannot hear it.

    I understand the issue they have though. I am partially color blind so trying to explain certain colors to me or for me to even believe they exist is a leap of faith on my part since I cannot see them.
     
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  2. trouserpress

    trouserpress Tele-Holic

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    In things audio - when your goal is the "pleasant sound" - it is always good if you strive for compensation. If you aim for "transparency" compensation is your enemy.
     
  3. Nick Fanis

    Nick Fanis Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    Generally the heavier = the brighter but the neck mass plays a more important role as well as the type and,more significantly,the AGE of strings and the set up (neck relief especially and action) and of course the FRETS (large frets are brighter) and bridge type/weight.

    Still all the differences mentioned above are slight compared to the difference the pickups make through an amp.

    Acoustically the differences are way more noticeable but "disappear" through an amp.
     
  4. DHart

    DHart Friend of Leo's

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    Most of us here are all saying much the same thing. :lol: The guitar has a lot of influence over how a pickup sounds!

    Past time to leave it, I'm sure. Until the next time the topic pops up, once again. :eek:
     
  5. DHart

    DHart Friend of Leo's

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    So true... I'm retired now and I spend most of my days playing my variety of guitars through a clean amp that sits on my music desk, right beside my head. I've been a musician for 53 years (starting playing as a young teenager).

    There are significant tone differences, some subtle, some quite dramatic, between each and every Tele and Strat (of the 14 Fenders) that I have. I'm quite "attuned" to hearing these subtleties.

    A lot of the subtleties would be completely lost in a band setting, or playing with an moderate dose of overdrive. So, to some players... some of the differences wouldn't be heard, nor appreciated. But that doesn't apply to ALL of us.

    Each of us hears what we hear and there isn't any disputing that. As to precisely what these subtle tonal variations can be attributed to, scientifically, that's a lot harder to quantify. But the qualitative difference is there to be heard, IF you're attuned to it. And the qualitative difference is all that really matters to a musician.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2019
  6. fender4life

    fender4life Friend of Leo's

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    I get it too, but the problem is they get angry rather then keep and open mind and assume they may hear it too at some point. Or even that they main reason they don't is it can be hard to tell without doing A/B tests with all else being equal or by just owning many of both thill it becomes obvious. And it will. But many just get angry. That I DON'T get.
     
  7. fenderchamp

    fenderchamp Tele-Afflicted

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    light strings always seem much brighter and twangier than heavy ones to me. 11's kind of knock some of the twang right out of a tele
     
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  8. jrblue

    jrblue Tele-Afflicted

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    They're different guitars in virtually every respect, so they ought to sound different. The pot differences alone are massive. The wood is low on the list of relative significances, though still perhaps a factor.
     
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  9. DHart

    DHart Friend of Leo's

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    Yes, and it's the pot differences, in particular, which are surprising in how much darker the Twang King sounded in that body. No amount of high resistance volume pot (930k) could overcome how dark the pickup sounded in THAT body. Yet in the mahogany Thinline, just a 350k volume pot gave the Twang King a lot of sparkle. (NO-LOAD tone pots are used in my guitars, as I do not often like to engage the tone pot.)

    The alder-bodied Player Tele most definitely imparts a very warm character to whatever pickup is in the instrument. Just as my mahogany '69 Thinline Tele imparts a very bright character to whatever pickup I put in it. The Twang King sounded like night or day, depending on which body it was in.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2019
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  10. Richie-string

    Richie-string Tele-Meister

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    I must admit that i have always seemed to perceive the ash/maple combination to be quite a bit different tonally. With Teles i have always slightly preferred the ash/maple combination over alder/rosewood. With Strats i tend to like both options, but i can definitely hear a difference between the two.
     
  11. kelnet

    kelnet Telefied Ad Free Member

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    So what? Does this mean that you'll only play one of those guitars? Do you now have guitars that are a complete waste of money? Also, how does all of this research affect how well you can play?
     
  12. DHart

    DHart Friend of Leo's

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    Well, you're a piece a work, ain't ya 'kelnet'!

    Living in Canada gettin' to ya?

    Bugger off grumble butt. :rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2019
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  13. DHart

    DHart Friend of Leo's

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    There certainly does seem to be a brightness imparted by maple & ash vs. rosewood and alder. I would not disagree with you. :)
     
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  14. kelnet

    kelnet Telefied Ad Free Member

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    No. Honestly, has your search for confirmation of your ideas made any difference to how you play your guitars or which guitars you play?
     
  15. DHart

    DHart Friend of Leo's

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    As if you really care? :lol:

    My posts bother you and you're only here to stir up crap. You don't deserve a response.... but I'll give you one anyway! :)

    I learned something significant to me in this process and it makes a difference in what pickups I install in which guitars. I happen to like tuning my guitars to sound the way I want them to sound. I think that's pretty obvious.

    And I play whatever guitar happens to strike my application or my fancy at the moment - if that makes any difference to you, which I'm certain that it doesn't.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2019
  16. Crawldaddy

    Crawldaddy Tele-Holic

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    The Dimarzio Twang King is quite a dark, almost muddy-sounding pickup, yet it is characterful and takes overdrive extremely well. I use a capacitor in series to achieve a high-pass filter such that the low-mid to treble frequencies are able to cut through.

    I think the only reason why I'm holding onto it in my mongrel telecaster is because I've been using it for almost 15 years, and I could not be bothered to change at this point in time.

    FYI this is in relation to over 10 telecasters I have played since 2004.
     
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  17. DHart

    DHart Friend of Leo's

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    Crawdaddy... that sure has been my experience, as well - and it was a surprise to me, as I've read some people saying that they think the Twang king is a bright pickup? Go figure.

    Combine a relatively warm/dark pickup with a relatively warm/dark body and the result is a whole lotta warm/dark! :lol: In my case, I bought the body in a stripped-down form, so I didn't know that it was especially warm. And I was under the impression that the Twang King was not a warm pickup. So... my eyes sure got opened with this particular experience.

    And with my recently acquired maple/ash Tele - it mirrors my maple/ash Strat - in that both are snappy, bright guitars. So, I do get the impression that the combination of maple & ash can contribute to a brighter result than one may typically find with rosewood & alder.

    As I mentioned earlier, though, the Twang King sounds very good in my very bright sounding mahogany '69 Thinline. And my especially bright Lioness pickup is a great match with the warm-bodied Player Tele. So in the end - I found happy combinations that sound good and please me. As Shakespeare told us long ago - "All's well that ends well." :)
     
  18. kelnet

    kelnet Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Okay, so this post and your next post actually answered my questions. It doesn't really affect how your play you guitars, but how you build a guitar. I'm guessing you won't be putting a Twang King in any future guitars, being too dark for you.
     
  19. kelnet

    kelnet Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Would changing the tone settings on the amp do the same thing?
     
  20. Old Deaf Roadie

    Old Deaf Roadie Tele-Holic

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    I see 2 different guitars. Wood type aside, consider there are two different tailpieces, 2 different pup switches, 2 different pickup combinations, and 2 different neck pups. Any of those factors has shown throughout history to have an impact on tone. How can they not sound different? My opinion concerning wood type is that it will mostly affect the instrument's ability to produce natural sustain and attack comes mostly from technique. The only way, IMO, to find out if it is the pickups is to try them on the same instrument. Whatever you hear after the swap is the answer to your question.
     
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