Camping tent as a spray booth?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by fleezinator, May 23, 2020.

  1. fleezinator

    fleezinator TDPRI Member

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    I'm planning on using rattle cans but my small test in an opened garage shows how much dust & bugs can inadvertently land on the body's surface. I don't want to deal with box fans in a garage because explosions so I had the idea of spraying in a camping tent that I think would provide ventilation (I'll still be using a respirator), a bug free environment (not sure on dust), and some wind protection.

    I've seen purpose specific popup spray tents but since I've got an old camping tent laying about, I figured I could repurpose it.

    Any drawbacks to this plan? Has anyone used a setup like this before?

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. dogmeat

    dogmeat Tele-Afflicted

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    explosion? more likely in the tent than with a fan & home made cabinet.:lol: I dunno.... I think some ventilation is a good idea. the tent would work but I'd put a fan on one end and a filter on the other
     
  3. galaxiex

    galaxiex Tele-Afflicted

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    Use the box fan to pressurize the spray booth/tent/environment.

    IOW have the fan blowing fresh air INTO the booth, rather than using it to exhaust the booth.
    Put a filter on the inlet side of the fan.

    Of course you need to provide an outlet (vent) for the over-spray.

    Using a fan to suck air out....
    means every little crack and crevice is a potential inlet for dust laden air that bypasses the inlet air filter.

    Filtering the air and then blowing it into the booth, means any cracks or crevices are also "exhaust ports".
     
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  4. ElJay370

    ElJay370 Tele-Afflicted

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  5. raito

    raito Poster Extraordinaire

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  6. beyer160

    beyer160 Friend of Leo's

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    I used a garment box from Home Depot- seal the cracks with tape, cut a flap as needed and seal back up when you're done spraying. Not perfect, but worked well enough for a cheap 'n' cheerful DIY solution for rattlecan painting.

    Screen Shot 2020-05-23 at 2.47.14 PM.png
     
  7. EsquireBoy

    EsquireBoy Tele-Afflicted

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    Reading the title it seems like a bad idea already :rolleyes: Thinking about it I'm starting to imagine all the trouble that might happen. Chances are you're going to ruin the tent, and each time I go camping, I end up with a whole lot of bugs inside mine.
    I like @beyer160 's idea a lot a more.
     
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  8. fleezinator

    fleezinator TDPRI Member

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    As I mentioned, it's an old tent that I'm going to repurpose so I expect the tent to be 'ruined' in the sense that it'll now be used strictly as a spray booth.

    I built a spray stand and I measured an area of at least 4'x4' and that's where the tent idea came to mind.

    [​IMG]

    The tent itself is vented on the sides under the rainfly similar to this. With both zippered windows I can control the amount of cross breeze so I'm not planning to use box fans.
    [​IMG]

    The garment boxes are an interesting idea but seems like one side would be open so you can spray and that sounds like an opportunity for wind to blast thru.

    I think I'll just go for the experiment & post up my results here. Thanks!
     
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  9. Old Deaf Roadie

    Old Deaf Roadie Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    The trick to keeping the dust from ruining a finish is to have a clean area to spray without wind or drafts kicking things up. Try wetting the floor of the shop (wet, not flooded) and getting some old bed sheets that you can wet & make a booth with by hanging from the rafters or garage door tracks or whatever. Use a respirator & ventilate & you should be fine as long as your drying temp is within limits set by the paint manufacturer. The wet fabric will help catch dust & overspray.
     
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  10. Bergy

    Bergy Tele-Holic

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    I’m finishing a guitar with nitro for the first time. I don’t have a lot of the proper tools. I have a very small shed with just enough room to fit a table. I was worried about dust and bugs so I started covering the guitar with this plastic container. Obviously the guitars gotta lie flat and be flipped. I was worried that covering it up like this between coats might mess with the drying, no ill effects thus far. Granted it has been dry, warm and calm lately. I could see something like this causing blushing or other problems in less hospitable environments.

    9A23DEE4-5EC1-40EF-B499-80F544856635.jpeg

    I feel like getting in and out of a tent full of nitro fumes, wearing a respirator is going to be clumsy as all get out. Sometimes just getting out of a tent in the morning during a camping trip is about as graceful as a car full of clowns.
     
  11. Ricky D.

    Ricky D. Doctor of Teleocity

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    Your personal breathing air supply is the only obvious potential problem. You worry about explosion risk with a box fan, you should be more worried about breathing all those evaporated fractions. That's toxic stuff. Your respirator can catch the particulates, but the rest is straight into your lungs.

    No way I'd do what you propose. I would need forced air ventilation in a small volume like that tent.
     
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  12. FenderLover

    FenderLover Poster Extraordinaire

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    You're in Texas. I wouldn't worry about the furnace right now. I spray in my basement workshop - where the furnace is. It doesn't take too long, fumes are not bad, dissipates quickly. Then again, I was raised during a time when cars still had steel dashboards, and I drink tap water.
     
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  13. Gardo

    Gardo Tele-Holic

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    I’ve done the same thing many times,
    The big drawback is that it makes the house smell bad.
     
  14. FenderLover

    FenderLover Poster Extraordinaire

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    In an older house, perhaps. My shop has a door on it and the furnace is a closed system, fresh air comes from outside. If it smelled bad, my wife would have said something.
     
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  15. fleezinator

    fleezinator TDPRI Member

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    Inhalation is always a concern of course. Are you saying that even with my respirator rated for organic vapors, they can still get thru? because that'd be a serious problem, tent, proper booth or otherwise.

    As I mentioned, the tent will have cross breeze so it's not like its a vacuum with no movement at all. It's an 8'x6' tent. I hear you on the danger, and I'd do a brief test to ensure air isn't trapped.
     
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  16. Ricky D.

    Ricky D. Doctor of Teleocity

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    If it is rated for the particular materials you are using, you are okay.
     
  17. dogmeat

    dogmeat Tele-Afflicted

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    without some kind of evacuation the overspray will just hang there and some will eventually fall back on the work. yes, you can sand and compound it out but its extra work.

    a mask that handles organic vapors is only good if it fits properly. guessing you are talking about a NIOSH half mask with cartridge filters like N7500-1. it'll work but high particle concentrations make the filter life short.
     
  18. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

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    I personally can't imagine spraying a guitar in a tent. It would be claustrophobic, there wouldn't be enough room and I would think it would be really uncomfortable.

    I started spraying in my garage, but now do all my finishing outside. I spray only nitrocellulose lacquer altho I have experimented with water born lacquers (which does solve some of the hazards of nitro). I started by making a little spray "booth" out of cardboard (a guitar shipping box) - it did an acceptable job of containing the overspray

    Back 5.jpg

    I found that I didn't like spraying an instrument while it was hanging so now I do everything flat on a low table or a little stool, I can walk around the guitar and spray the sides as well as top or back. A slight disadvantage of spraying flat is that I can only do top or back at a time, that really isn't a problem

    IMG_0742-1.jpg

    The reason this works is that lacquer dries so fast. I shoot a coat and by the time I've cleaned my gun it is dry to the touch - maybe five minutes. Any bugs or dust that happens to get into it during that time is easily sanded out - my schedule is three coats a day, sanding before each set to remove any sags or dust or orange peel, then three more coats until I've built the thickness I want. Each coat burns into the the last - the finish becomes one layer.

    I only shoot on nice days with the temp above 60 F and RH between 40 and 60. If the wind is blowing I don't shoot - I've learned to be patient. My last coat is always highly thinned but I'm not good enough that I don't have to wet sand and buff. FWIW I always wear a canister style mask.
     
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  19. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    Correct. Needs to have a fit test at a professional paint supplier. But fresh air supply is more important

    The tent is a bad idea. Ventilation is not self-creating, and filtering organic vapors are NOT the only issue - oxygen displacement is. If it's only vented near the top solvents displace oxygen down low - painters have bent down to check something, passed out from lack of oxygen and died. It is one of the most common fatal accidents in coatings wiork with solvent-based materials.
     
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  20. JAckal66

    JAckal66 Tele-Meister

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    I had a buddy that took a canopy and covered the sides with tarps\plastic.
    He painted motorcycles & parts in it.
    He had a table set up with a box around it, and a fan for exhaust.
    Had furnace filters on the entrance. shopping.jpeg
    He started with a frame made from pvc pipe, and plastic stretched over it, before moving to this.
     
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