Calling Bike Mechs

Milspec

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There has been a few threads lately regarding bicycles and so I thought I would roll the dice to see if we had any bike mechanics in the house?

I am putting some final touches on my bike in preparations for workday commuting a few times per week. It is a 7 year old Surly Long Haul Trucker, but it had some mods done to it to shave some weight and make it more group ride friendly by the previous owner. Simple stuff like upgraded bar, gossamer crankset, upgraded brakes, a Brooks saddle, F/R racks, and the Mavic cxp 33 wheel set. I've ridden this bike for years now on casual rides of about 10-12 miles, but nothing loaded nor longer.

My work commute would consist of 40 miles round-trip with some really bad hills, so I wanted to make certain the bike was up to the challenge. I am not a big bike guy so I didn't really know what all the specs meant until I started doing some research. Over-all, seems to be well equipped for my needs and it had a full tune up a year ago before putting into storage, but there was one glaring issue....those Mavic cxp 33 wheels and my tires (Continental Tour).

The Mavic wheels are a 700c wheel and I have always run the same size tire that was on it when I purchased the bike (35mm wide). After researching the specs, I came to realize that the Mavic cxp 33 is only listed as suitable for a max width of 28mm and isn't really heavy duty enough for loaded riding. I don't carry much on my rides except spare tubes, tools, water, change of socks, a jacket if needed, etc., but I am a heavy load at 215 lbs.

So, now I am a bit worried about the wheel situation. There are no visible cracks around the spokes or anything, but it would seem that 35mm is way outside the 28mm limit set by the factory. I just don't know if that factory limit is just an outdated COA suggestion or if it is a real world stop sign?

What do you think? Do I replace the tires with 28 mm? Do I upgrade to better wheels and keep the 35mm or maybe even go up to a 40mm? Hell, maybe I am better off selling this bike and just buying a new Surly Disc Trucker instead to gain disc brakes? What about tubless tires?

Just a little confused right now and sort of wish I just remained ignorant about the whole thing.
 

Stanford Guitar

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Some good info here: https://www.bikeforums.net/touring/551934-opinions-cxp-33s-touring.html

Might be fun to buy Jobst Brandt's book on wheel building, a cheap truing stand, and build yourself a new set of wheels using the existing hubs you have. It's really not that complicated.

I'd say, carry a tube/pump and ride them till they break. Also carry an extra spoke and some electrical tape, you're likely to break a spoke once they begin to fail.
 

1 21 gigawatts

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If it rides OK with the 35s, I wouldn't hesitate to ride them. You aren't going to damage the wheels. I'd ride the 35s until they need replacing, then go to a 28 or 32 if it makes you feel better.

Tubeless have less rotating mass, but I'd run tubes on a commuter for reliability.
 

Milspec

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dean

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It looks like the rims are 622x15, so the 35s would work, but are just a little wide. I use this chart when I pick tire sizes. Depending on the terrain you’re riding on, 28 to 32 would be fine for commuting.

1654736931722.png
 

Stanford Guitar

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The 32's seem to be running fine on them. The issue with those rims isn't internal width, it's finished sidewall gauge. Racing rims are milled thinner to save weight. Those rims will not last long under heavy load and braking, relative to commuter rims. But you'll still get many miles out of them, probably 1000's. And when they do start to fail, you'll likely break a spoke or two, and/or see the brake wearing through the rim wall...and they'll still be rideable! Rims are pretty tough unless you're doing technical mountain biking.
 
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Nightclub Dwight

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I do have fenders, but removed them years ago. Just hated the looks of it.
Cool bike. I used to do a 40 mile round trip commute on a 1969 Raleigh 3 speed for a few years. Durability and function win out over speed and weight in my opinion. I'd reattach those mud guards, and get some more lights. And ALWAYS wear a helmet.

From everything you have posted about your past athletic history and work experience, I think this is going to work out great for you.
 

Telekarster

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I don't know enough about bicycles to comment, but I can give your thread a bump and hope you find your answers man! Good luck and be safe out there. Grow eyes in the back of your head, and maybe the sides too. A lot of people out there "driving" these days, and not really driving... if you know what I mean... :oops::rolleyes:
 

telemnemonics

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I think you should worry more about modern society on the road, than those rims.
I have a few wheelests using them, rum em till you kill em those are good rims!
How many years of 40 mile daily commutes are you thinking?
I dont have it in me to do that even once what with my own carcass being banged up.
Good on you, be careful out there!
 

tomasz

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To support what was said above, ride them if the current setup is doing fine. That said though, the mavic 33 cxp are road rims, speced for a tire width of 19-28mm. I'd personally probably get down to 28 at the next tire change, which would also reduce rolling resistance.

28 is plenty of tire, to support any load, I've been riding 25s on road bikes with the full setup weight exceeding 120kg with no issues. You can always pick tires with some side reinforcement or a tougher center strip, if you are getting punctures.
 
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stormsedge

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I have 32s and 28s on my two road bikes. They've both worn well and I weigh about what you do. I doubt there is enough size difference to cause you any issues on your rims.

Do I upgrade to better wheels and keep the 35mm or maybe even go up to a 40mm?

Not until you have to...and look at the available tires before committing to wider rims. You may needlessly limit yourself.

Hell, maybe I am better off selling this bike and just buying a new Surly Disc Trucker instead to gain disc brakes?

If you can find one in your size and have the cash...why not? Realizing the bike market, like so many other things, is hyper-inflated right now. But buy the new bike first. That said, my newest bike has disc brakes and they are great here in mountain/very hilly terrain...my memories of riding in Nebraska make me think rim brakes are fine---truth be told, I wanted a sexier bike, but my old bike is perfectly fine (and less finicky to wrench on).
 

imwjl

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@Milspec within the family and friends we've fit 32 - 38 mm tires in frames published for smaller without any expense of new wheels. A friend with I believe same Surly got a few mm larger "gravel" type than the well regarded Schwalbe Marathon touring tires for some more size and a better ride. The little bit of tread offers a level of flat protection.

Another friend got the popular Panaracer GravelKing SS 32 mm in his frame for 28 go get a nicer ride and handling weight. They are smooth where rubber hits the pavement but surprisingly good on loose stuff.

If you consider the Disc Trucker look at others too because there are SO many good all/gravel/tour/any bikes these days. There are web sites that compare geometry so you can really figure out what would be a great fit. The Surly models have been rather traditional. The touring Sutra from Kona is priced similarly and many love its geometry and setup as a Surly alternative. Trek has modernized their famous tourer similar to those for a few good steel bike choices. That's no way putting the Surlys down - they are great - as much as pointing out it's now a segment with a lot of great choice.

If you are going to be commuting absolutely get good lights and bright colors. Get a USB chargable 60 or more lumen tail light and a LED headlight that flashes. Get a modern helmet with schema for twisting like MIPS or that corrugated inner like Bontrager and Smith have.
 

Lowerleftcoast

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I agree with the others, I think the rims will be OK.

I commuted to work for a little over 3 years before I retired. No snow here so I rode year round. Round trip was about 27 miles. I started with a heavy mountain bike (cheap), I soon changed to a used road bike. I enjoyed the ride so, with the projected gas savings, I figured I could buy a new road bike. It paid for itself. I researched and tried several. I stumbled across the Specialized Roubiax. In the Tour de France, Roubaix is known for cobblestones. My bike is several years old now so I can't comment on the new version. My Roubaix is carbon fiber (even the crank set) and built to flex just a little to absorb the cobblestone punishment. Compared to other bikes, even carbon fiber bikes, it rides smooth. I really notice the difference in fatigue. I feel like I have ridden about 40 miles when I have done 100. I joke that it rides like a Cadillac.

Idk if a road bike fits your needs but there is probably a much more comfortable bike for your commute if you choose to upgrade.
 

telemnemonics

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To support what was said above, ride them if the current setup is doing fine. That said though, the mavic 33 cxp are road rims, speced for a tire width of 19-28mm. I'd personally probably get down to 28 at the next tire change, which would also reduce rolling resistance.

28 is plenty of tire, to support any load, I've been riding 25s on road bikes with the full setup weight exceeding 120kg with no issues. You can always pick tires with some side reinforcement or a tougher center strip, if you are getting punctures.
Yeah Ive never heard that heavier riders require wider tires?
Tandems even seem fine with normal width tires and are not typically fitted with extra wide tires.
Touring bikes carrying loads idealize durability but also lower rolling resistance, so wide tires are really not promoted, though wider than road racing tires of course.

Its funny how ideas get started on what you must do and what you cant do.
After my bike got stolen in NYC I threw together a new one speed one brake messenger style from spare parts, and the best wheels I had happened to be tubulars AKA sewups.
I rode those for years and only got one flat!
Almost anyone you asked at the time would say you cant do that.
 

Milspec

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Thanks for all the advice folks, it has put me at greater ease. I decided to just ride on these wheels while keeping an eye out for a good deal on an upgrade down the road. It handled well today over 15 mile ride through the worst hills I could find to rebuild leg strength. I did better than expected, but it is supposed to be over 100 degrees much of next week and I will gladly pay any gas price to not ride in that kind of heat.

You are so right telemnemonics about what people say that you must do or not do with bikes. I had one rider come up on me today and lecture me about still using flat pedals. He ranted for several minutes about how much easier and faster the ride would be if I used clipless pedals, but I never agreed with that.

There has never been an engineering study to support the claim that being clipped to the pedal increases downward force nor revolutions. What it does do is make sure that your foot placement is always the same and that you don't slip off the pedal. I can see that value in racing, but really not much else. I use crankbrothers 5050 flat pedals with threaded barbs to keep my shoe from slipping off. They spin smoothly and I have never slipped off the pedal once while wearing a stiff soled trail running shoe. I see no reason to change.
 




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